We asked participants in ACRL’s Assessment in Action (AiA) to share a few thoughts on their experience. Here is what Nancy Goebel from the University of Alberta Libraries had to say about her project: “Can the Personal Librarian program help make the University of Alberta Libraries more relevant and supportive for students in specific populations?”

Augustana Campus Faculty Portraits

Augustana Campus Faculty – Nancy Goebel

Abstract: The Personal Librarian for Aboriginal Students (PLAS) program aimed to deepen Aboriginal (native) students’ engagement with library services, collections and services. In the PLAS program, incoming Aboriginal students were partnered with a “Personal Librarian”.

Most weeks in the academic/project year students were emailed a short hint on how to do research and, always, an encouragement to contact their Personal Librarian. Participating students and Personal Librarians were surveyed at the end of the academic/project year.

  1. What was your greatest challenge during the course of your Assessment in Action project?  AiA was the biggest project, by far, that I have been involved in which included partners exclusively outside of the library and across multiple campuses.  I think that both of these factors will influence how I think about most of my work for the rest of my career.  I will more naturally consider how the project might be strengthened with non-library partners and considering the needs of multiple campuses adds complexity but is true to the full needs of the campuses’ users and that consideration is essential.
  2. What is your #1 recommendation for other librarians who want to conduct an assessment project on student learning and success?  I am a big advocate for pilot programs.  Not to say that everything can or should be spontaneous or not fully-planned but rather create opportunities for good ideas to have a chance to flourish.  To be efficient and effective with resources we must not be wasteful so good planning and creative thinking are core components in pilots too.
  3. What is the #1 thing you gained through your participation in Assessment in Action? AiA was not my first consideration of the importance of assessment in my career. However, it made a lasting impact in terms of the consideration of assessment now being front and center with all work that I do.  I think it is important to have evidence to support the work we do and also use evidence to inform what might be the best route to take even if it is not the preferred route by whatever constituent.

Thank you very much Nancy for the excellent post and congratulations on completing AiA!

 

Jamie Segno photoWe asked participants in ACRL’s Assessment in Action (AiA) to share a few thoughts on their experience. Here is what Jamie Segno from the Alvin Sherman Library, Research & Information Technology Center at Nova Southeastern University had to say about her project: “Library Boot Camp” Optional Research Workshops on Student Learning:

Abstract: Library Boot Camp is an optional research workshop offered six times per semester to help students improve their information literacy skills. By administering pre/post tests before and after each session, this project investigated the impact of Library Boot Camp on students’ ability to use library resources to effectively find needed information. Despite low attendance at the workshops, a preliminary comparison of the paired test results revealed nearly a 60 percent increase, suggesting the instruction was beneficial.

  1. What was your greatest challenge during the course of your Assessment in Action project?

At first, I felt overwhelmed.  However, I soon realized that I was not alone and did not have to reinvent the wheel.  I learned to reach out to our AiA facilitators, who possessed a wealth of knowledge, my cohort, who was a great source for ideas and encouragement, and my team, who could help accomplish tasks. In doing a literature review, I gained great insight on similar projects and even found instruments that we could use.  

  1. What is your #1 recommendation for other librarians who want to conduct an assessment project on student learning and success?

Before deciding on your project, I would recommend to have several conversations with staff in other offices at your institution (i.e. academic advisors, administrators, faculty, etc.) to see what data they would be interested in gathering.  This will not only help you identify where your goals align, but it could help you design a project that they would find very useful.  This may help generate buy-in for the project (and your library) and could even lead you to potential team members. 

  1. What is the #1 thing you gained through your participation in Assessment in Action?

I’ve gained a lot of things through AiA such as an expanded network of colleagues and stronger partnerships within my institution.  Most of all, I now feel confident with the assessment process. Even when things didn’t go as planned, I now have great ideas on what to do next time!

Thank you Jamie for the wonderful update!

 

“Assessment in Action” Project Posters at ALA Annual Conference

 Assessment in Action  Comments Off on “Assessment in Action” Project Posters at ALA Annual Conference
Jun 182015
 

Assessment in Action LogoComing to the ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco? Be sure to see assessment project posters presented by the second year participants in ACRL’s program “Assessment in Action: Academic Libraries and Student Success”(AiA). Librarian-led teams carried out assessment projects over 14 months at their community colleges, colleges and universities. The projects examined the impact of the library (instruction, reference, collections, space, and more) on student learning/success. Part of the 64 teams will present posters during each time slot:

Assessment in Action: Second Year Project Posters, Session I
Friday, June 26, 2015, 2-4:00pm
Moscone Convention Center, 3006 (W)

Assessment in Action: Second Year Project Posters, Session II
Saturday, June 27, 2015, 8:30-10:30am
Hilton San Francisco Union Square, Imperial B

Learn more about these assessment projects from the abstracts in the poster guide (pdf). Additionally, teams are submitting online posters and final project reports, which will be analyzed and synthesized in a report released by ACRL later this year. The individual reports and poster images will be available later this summer in a searchable online collection.

ACRL is undertaking AiA in partnership with the Association for Institutional Research and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. The program, a cornerstone of ACRL’s Value of Academic Libraries initiative, is made possible by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

© 2014 ACRL Value of Academic Libraries Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha