Christina E. Dent  Emerson College

Christina E. Dent

The ACRL Value in Academic Libraries team asked recent participants in the Assessment in Action program to reflect on their work and we were simply floored by the generous responses.

Following is a reflection by Christina E. Dent, Instruction Librarian at Iwasaki Library, Emerson College. Christina’s primary research question was: Does librarian involvement in first-year writing classes impact student achievement and research skills?

1. What was your greatest challenge during the course of your Assessment in Action project?

My greatest challenge was probably just getting started and having confidence in myself to leave the team. I’m not a statistics person, so I never saw myself as someone who could run a project like this. But I had great statistics people on my team who helped me achieve the project vision.

2. What is your #1 recommendation for other librarians who want to conduct an assessment project on student learning and success?

Don’t reinvent the wheel. You’d be surprised how much information and data you already have that you can build upon for a larger scale project. Also, we had a lot of success with our project because we decided to work with a program–first-year writing–with whom we already had a great working relationship.  Start with partners you already have and see if you can expand the scope of your assessment with them.

3. What is the #1 thing you gained through your participation in Assessment in Action?

My main insight may seem anticlimactic, but I was/am surprised that my team was able to do such a large scale project at all.  I found the very idea daunting at first and wasn’t sure how I would pull it off.  But large projects are just like small projects with more steps.  They come together is the same way as any project–with planning and working with a strong, passionate team.

 
Jess Burkhardt, Public Services Librarian at DeSales University

Jess Burkhardt, Public Services Librarian at DeSales University

The ACRL Value in Academic Libraries team asked recent participants in the Assessment in Action program to reflect on their work and we and we continue to be thankful for the generous responses of AiA participants.

Following is a reflection by Jess Burkhardt, Public Services Librarian at DeSales University Trexler Library on her project: Is video instruction or traditional, face-to-face instruction more effective for teaching Searching as Strategic Exploration to DeSales ACCESS students?

  1. What was your greatest challenge during the course of your Assessment in Action project?

Since DeSales University is small, our greatest challenge was designing a research project that established enough controls to generate data that revealed true correlation. Our post-traditional undergraduate classes are taught in the evenings and the class sizes are very small. We still broke each class into two groups so that there was a control group (one-shot instruction taught in-person), but unfortunately there was still a bit of variety in the classes to which we gained access and our sample size was too small to determine statistical significance. After a pilot iteration we revised and repeated our project.

  1. What is your #1 recommendation for other librarians who want to conduct an assessment project on student learning and success?

I recommend that everyone who wants to conduct an assessment project displays the same level of perseverance we encourage our students to display in their research endeavors. Break your project into steps, repeat as necessary, and follow through to the end (sharing with stakeholders/your campus).

  1. What is the #1 thing you gained through your participation in Assessment in Action?

My participation in Assessment in Action provided me with the confidence to pursue assessment projects in the future and the joy of sharing the results with my campus. Faculty and administration provided a great deal of positive feedback and encouraged me to do more assessment in the future. We are continuing our study. It’s nice to be able to know that our services are meeting student needs!

 

 

 

The ACRL Value in Academic Libraries team asked recent participants in the Assessment in Action program to reflect on their work and we were simply floored by the generous responses.

Following is a reflection by Elise Ferer from Drexel University Libraries on her project: Putting the Library to Work: Information Literacy Skills in Co-op Job Search 

  1. What was your greatest challenge during the course of your Assessment in Action project?

My greatest challenge in my Assessment in Action project was trying to bring together people across campus who all had very busy schedules and different motivations along with carving out time for all of us to work on the project. I had to focus on what was the takeaways from the project for my campus team – why should they be interested in helping me with this project. 

  1. What is your #1 recommendation for other librarians who want to conduct an assessment project on student learning and success?

I would recommend that librarians who want to do this kind of work find campus partners who have some of the same goals, it makes the project mean more and creates or strengthens relationships for further outreach and assessment. 

  1. What is the #1 thing you gained through your participation in Assessment in Action?

The most important thing I gained from this project is a collaborative relationship with my campus partners, this project has led to increased involvement in what happens outside the four walls of the library and a better understanding of how we can support career services at Drexel.

© 2014 ACRL Value of Academic Libraries Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha