New Date: Sept 24 ACRL Online Discussion “National Credentialing and Academic Libraries”

 Communicating Value, Events, Library Impact on Students  Comments Off on New Date: Sept 24 ACRL Online Discussion “National Credentialing and Academic Libraries”
Sep 152015
 

The free ACRL online discussion forum “National Credentialing and Academic Libraries” will now be held from 2 – 3 p.m. Central (noon – 1 p.m. Pacific | 1 – 2 p.m. Mountain | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. Central | 3 – 4 p.m. Eastern) on Thursday, September 24. ACRL and over 80 other organizations recently joined the Lumina Foundation in co-sponsoring a national dialogue on credentialing which calls for ways to transform our nation’s highly diverse and fragmented credentialing system into one that is student-centered and learning-based. Join this ACRL online discussion forum to share your best thinking around what changes are needed and the potential role academic librarians and/or ACRL could play in transforming credentialing in the United States. Submit your free registration online by 2:00 p.m. Central on Wednesday, September 23. The webcast will be recorded and made available shortly after the live event. Complete details are available in a past ACRL Insider post.

Earlier today, ACRL responded to selected questions on the Connecting Credentials website. See also Connecting Credentials: a Beta Credentials Framework for more on these concepts. Are you new to these issues? Stay tuned for more later this week when the next issue of ACRL’s current awareness publication Keeping up With… focuses on national credentialing and academic libraries.

Assessment in Action (AiA) – An update from Judith M. Arnold from Wayne State University Libraries

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Sep 112015
 

judithAs part of our ongoing series of blog posts from participants in ACRL’s Assessment in Action (AiA), we asked Judith M. Arnold from Wayne State University Libraries to share a few thoughts on their experience. Here is what Judith had to say about her project: “Librarian Research Consultations & Student Success: How do students describe the experience of the research consultation and its value to them?” Abstract:

Ten semi-structured interviews were conducted with graduate and undergraduate students who had completed a face-to-face research consultation appointment with a librarian. Qualitative transcript analysis unearthed 7 recurring themes, of which, Confidence and Learning, were among the most frequently reported. All students reported Learning (a new resource, service or skill) and expressed an increase in Confidence in doing research, two factors that can lead to greater success completing research assignments.

  1. What was your greatest challenge during the course of your Assessment in Action project?

Project and time management were the most daunting, particularly when most of us who serve as Team Leaders are squeezing this project into our regular workload. The good news is that you CAN do it. The on-site meetings and Moodle course are structured to keep you on task and to provide you with the skills and tools you need to complete the project. When you present your project poster at ALA Annual, you will be saying to yourself (proudly), “I can’t believe we did this!”

  1. What is your #1 recommendation for other librarians who want to conduct an assessment project on student learning and success?

Get involved with Assessment in Action and just DO it! Pick a manageable-sized team of colleagues whose strengths complement each other and whose work ethics match your own. You will learn so much about assessment from the facilitators, the course materials, and the learning community of your peers. The confidence that you gain from this experience will spur you on to tackle more assessment projects. 

  1. What is the #1 thing you gained through your participation in Assessment in Action?

Once you complete your AiA project, you will be amazed at the opportunities that it opens up. We have used our study results to begin work on a larger scale assessment project, to have a conversation with the university’s assessment coordinator, and to provide evidence of the library’s (and librarian’s) value to student success to our general education reform committee.

Thank you Judith — a terrific project and a very thoughtful update!

ACRL Online Discussion Forum “National Credentialing and Academic Libraries”

 Communicating Value, Events, Library Impact on Students  Comments Off on ACRL Online Discussion Forum “National Credentialing and Academic Libraries”
Sep 092015
 

Join us for the free ACRL online discussion forum “National Credentialing and Academic Libraries” on Thursday, September 24, from 2 – 3 p.m. Central (noon – 1 p.m. Pacific | 1 – 2 p.m. Mountain | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. Central | 3 – 4 p.m. Eastern).  Please note that you can convert additional time zones online athttp://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converterT.html.

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) and nearly 80 other organizations recently joined the Lumina Foundation in co-sponsoring a national dialogue on credentialing which calls for ways to transform our nation’s highly diverse and fragmented credentialing system into one that is student-centered and learning-based. Change is needed for several reasons: to ensure educational quality; increase access; better align the work of industry, education and certification/licensure agencies; multiply the benefits of increased attainment; reduce social inequity; and foster individual progress that results in market-valued credentials.

Join this ACRL online discussion forum on September 24 to share your best thinking around what changes are needed and the potential role academic librarians and/or ACRL could play in transforming credentialing in the United States. This discussion is right for you if you already know the basics of digital badges, understand the rationale for a credentialing framework and are beginning to form an opinion about how academic librarians may be uniquely positioned to contribute to this conversation. Your input will help inform ACRL’s contribution to the national conversation.

A group of ACRL member leaders from the Value of Academic Libraries committee and the Digital Badges interest group will kick off the online forum then open the floor for discussion. To help guide your thinking, you may wish to consider these questions:

  1. Should and could information literacy be packaged into a “stackable”, quantifiable credential (such as a digital badge or a certificate) that graduates would use as marketable “currency” in the job world?
  2. How would such a credential be scaffolded throughout the college experience in such a way that various institutions would be able to participate?
  3. Would ACRL become the credentialing body for such a credential or how would an information literacy credential be channeled through in a recognized way that would give it value?
  4. How would you foresee credentialing being developed at your institution?
  5. What role should ACRL play in this national credentialing initiative?

Are you new to these issues? Stay tuned for more later this month when the next issue of ACRL’s current awareness publication Keeping up With… focuses on national credentialing and academic libraries. It will come out prior to this online discussion and may help you prepare to contribute your best thinking.

How to register

Submit your free registration online by 2:00 p.m. Central, Wednesday  September 23, 2015.  The webcast will be recorded and made available shortly after the live event.

Questions should be directed to kmalenfant@ala.org.

© 2014 ACRL Value of Academic Libraries Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha