During the Value of Academic Libraries update session at ALA in San Francisco, Jennifer Fabbi (Library Dean, CSU San Marcos) and Carole Huston (Associate Provost, University of San Diego) shared their experience assessing information literacy within the framework of the WASC Senior College and University Commission. The presentation as well as sample assignments and rubrics are available here: http://biblio.csusm.edu/ilcore

Dr. Fabbi did the math for us on how libraries' contributions to accreditation add value

Dr. Fabbi did the math for us on how libraries’ contributions to accreditation processes add value

Assessment in Action: How do education majors create lesson plans?

 Assessment in Action, Communicating Value  Comments Off on Assessment in Action: How do education majors create lesson plans?
Jun 092015
 

The first participants in ACRL’s Assessment in Action program presented results from their projects at poster sessions at ALA Annual in Las Vegas, and their results are also being disseminated in library publications and conference presentations. We’ re thrilled to see more value-related research making its way into the world, and will be featuring synopses of projects and a brief Q&A with team leaders here at the Value blog over the next year. You can also read full descriptive reports for this and other AiA projects, along with a synthesis of all the first year AiA projects


Education majors use Danielson’s Four Domains of Professional Practice as a framework for their lesson plans

Education faculty members and librarians at Elizabethtown College collaborated to explore the following inquiry question: How do education majors apply standard 3 of the ACRL information literacy standards to meet Domain 1 of Danielson’s Four Domains of Professional Practice in the creation of their lesson plans? After mapping these standards and creating a rubric to assess lesson plans, the AiA team scored lesson plans of recent college alums found in public e-portfolios and developed a survey sent to all senior education majors. Elizabethtown College encourages faculty to utilize e-portfolio software (Digication) to showcase “real-world learning,” one of the college’s strategic goals. By tying institutional goals to departmental and library goals, librarians have the opportunity to enhance student success and demonstrate the library’s value to the curriculum.

Elizabeth Young, Head of Readers' Services at Elizabethtown College

Elizabeth Young Miller, Head of Readers’ Services at Elizabethtown College

Q&A with Elizabeth Young Miller of High Library, Elizabethtown College

Q: What was your greatest challenge during the course of your Assessment in Action project?

A: Creating buy-in from others for the project proved quite challenging at times; this was largely due to changes in personnel over the course of the project.  As a result, I became creative and flexible, developing new partnerships.  In the end, it all worked out.

Q: What is your #1 recommendation for other librarians who want to conduct an assessment project on learning and success?

A: Before embarking on a large scale assessment project, I highly recommend choosing your partners wisely.  Collaborating with a department that you have successfully worked with before, that you know is dedicated to student success, and that is committed to the project at hand will make for a more meaningful project, worthy of your time and energy.

Q: What is the #1 thing you gained through your participation in Assessment in Action?

A: My confidence level for working on assessment projects has soared as a result of participating in Assessment in Action (AiA).  As part of the project, our team designed a rubric and survey.  Not only did I collect feedback from colleagues at my institution, but also from AiA cohort members.  I received valuable training on analyzing data, which I was able to put into practice.  All of these experiences have made me feel more comfortable designing assessment metrics, which I have done since the completion of the AiA project.

For more information on Elizabethtown College’s AiA Project, check out the following LibGuide (http://libraryguides.etown.edu/aiaproject).

Assessment in Action: An Information Literacy Intervention for At-Risk Students

 Assessment in Action, Communicating Value  Comments Off on Assessment in Action: An Information Literacy Intervention for At-Risk Students
May 262015
 

The first participants in ACRL’s Assessment in Action program presented results from their projects at poster sessions at ALA Annual in Las Vegas, and their results are also being disseminated in library publications and conference presentations. We’ re thrilled to see more value-related research making its way into the world, and will be featuring synopses of projects and a brief Q&A with team leaders here at the Value blog over the next year. You can also read full descriptive reports for this and other AiA projects, along with a synthesis of all the first year AiA projects


 

Bridging the Critical Thinking Gap: Assessing the Integration of Information Literacy into the Curriculum for At-Risk Students

Arizona State University created a new Critical Thinking course for at-risk freshmen in 2010. They built information literacy skills into the course curriculum as well as many levels of student learning assessment. They sought to demonstrate, with data, how the library’s involvement was contributing to the course learning objectives, and whether students who completed the course persisted at a higher rate than their at-risk peers. The data collected and analyzed for the project showed that at-risk students who successfully completed the critical thinking course with an integrated information literacy component demonstrated increased knowledge of and confidence in their information literacy skills, recognized the value of those particular skills to their current and future academic work, and persisted at a higher rate than those who do not take the course.

Julie Tharp, Undergraduate Services Librarian at Arizona State University

Julie Tharp, Undergraduate Services Librarian at Arizona State University

Q&A with Julie Tharp of Arizona State University

Q: What was your greatest challenge during the course of your Assessment in Action project?

A: I didn’t have much experience doing assessment, much less on such a grand scale, so it was a big learning curve. The training we received during our first 2-day workshop at ALA was invaluable where we learned how to follow the Assessment Cycle, and practiced writing Inquiry Questions, Learning Outcomes, etc. But I would say the greatest challenge was the process of hashing out and writing those details with my team.  A related challenge was figuring out what tools we were going to need to develop that would adequately measure whether our student learning outcomes were met.

Q: What is your #1 recommendation for other librarians who want to conduct an assessment project on student learning and success?

A: Do it! It is rewarding in so many ways: it is an excellent opportunity to learn how to do a complex assessment; work closely with key colleagues across your campus; make connections you probably wouldn’t otherwise (for example, I would not have been able to get direct access to people in our Office of Evaluation and Educational Effectiveness to provide the persistence data, if not for the AiA project); and you realize firsthand how you truly are contributing to student success, and have data to prove it!

Q: What is the #1 thing you gained through your participation in Assessment in Action?

A: Momentum. My mindset/approach to every service I provide now is within the framework of its relationship to student success. And I have many ideas…

 

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