The first participants in ACRL’s Assessment in Action program presented results from their projects at poster sessions at ALA Annual in Las Vegas, and their results are also being disseminated in library publications and conference presentations. We’ re thrilled to see more value-related research making its way into the world, and will be featuring synopses of projects and a brief Q&A with team leaders here at the Value blog over the next year. You can also read full descriptive reports for this and other AiA projects, along with a synthesis of all the first year AiA projects

“I felt like such a Freshman!”: Creating Library Insiders

Independent learning activities, when coupled with reflection, are effective in providing an orientation to the library in particular and “academic life” in general. After participating in a self-guided library activity and reflecting on the process, students in DePaul’s First Year Experience program are able to articulate how the library can contribute to their success as academic learners.

Heather Jagman,  Coordinator of Reference, Instruction, and Academic Engagement at  DePaul University Library

Heather Jagman, Coordinator of Reference, Instruction, and Academic Engagement at DePaul University Library

Q&A with Heather Jagman, Coordinator of Reference, Instruction, and Academic Engagement

Q: What was your greatest challenge during the course of your Assessment in Action project?

A: Participating in the Assessment in Action project helped me overcome my greatest challenge—making time to do assessment.  Since I was accountable to my campus team and the AiA librarian cohort, it wasn’t something I could put on the backburner and do “when I had time.”

Q: What is your #1 recommendation for other librarians who want to conduct an assessment project on student learning and success?

A: Reach out to your academic and co-curricular partners!  They are interested in what we do, and are also looking for viable assessment projects.  See if you can capitalize on something you are already doing together—there’s no need to start from scratch and create some grand new experiment.  Libraries are already doing valuable and exciting work, and your partners can help you understand how you contribute to their success and the goals of your institution.    

Q: What is the #1 thing you gained through your participation in Assessment in Action? 

A: Visibility.  Your co-curricular partners want to hear about how the library contributes to student learning and success, and will help you tell your story.

 

The first participants in ACRL’s Assessment in Action program presented results from their projects at poster sessions at ALA Annual in Las Vegas, and their results are also being disseminated in library publications and conference presentations. We’ re thrilled to see more value-related research making its way into the world, and will be featuring synopses of projects and a brief Q&A with team leaders here at the Value blog over the next year. You can also read full descriptive reports for this and other AiA projects, along with a synthesis of all the first year AiA projects

Linked Literacies: The Library’s Impact on Foreign Language Students’ Cultural Learning

The Assessment in Action team at Stonehill College studied the impact of library instruction and access to library resources on novice Spanish-language learners’ ability to meet the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages Standards for Foreign Language Learning. The research showed statistically significant changes in students’ familiarity with library resources during the study. Quantitative data showed students believed access to library resources facilitated cultural learning.

Patricia O. McPherson,  Information Literacy and Outreach Librarian at Stonehill College MacPhaidin Library

Patricia O. McPherson, Information Literacy and Outreach Librarian at Stonehill College MacPhaidin Library

Q&A with Patricia O. McPherson, Information Literacy & Outreach Librarian

Q: What was your greatest challenge during the course of your Assessment in Action project?

A: Serving as team leader was a challenge. As the AiA poster presentation drew near, I found myself of reverting back to my old habits of doing not designating.

Q: What is your #1 recommendation for other librarians who want to conduct an assessment project on student learning and success?

A: I’d advise future AiA participants to be very thoughtful when choosing their team. Be aware of different demands that might prevent some team members from participating fully at times. In our case, final preparations for the AiA poster session coincided with the end of the semester – a particularly demanding time for our faculty team members. If your team does not include an experienced data analyst, consider inviting someone from institutional research to take part. If that isn’t possible, look to academic departments such as psychology, education or political science for faculty experts who can assist you with those tasks.

Q: What is the #1 thing you gained through your participation in Assessment in Action?

A: Despite any difficulties we encountered, the AiA experience was valuable, and helped prove the library’s value to the larger institution. As a result of our participation in this program we’ve compiled data that will help inform discussions on the library’s presence in the college’s learning management system, promote additional collaborations with academic departments in order to help students meeting discipline-specific proficiency standards, and help guide future design of LibGuides and other learning tools.

 

The first participants in ACRL’s Assessment in Action program presented results from their projects at poster sessions at ALA Annual in Las Vegas, and their results are also being disseminated in library publications and conference presentations. We’ re thrilled to see more value-related research making its way into the world, and will be featuring synopses of projects and a brief Q&A with team leaders here at the Value blog over the next year. You can also read full descriptive reports for this and other AiA projects, along with a synthesis of all the first year AiA projects

Why Collaborate? Examining the impact of faculty-librarian collaboration on students’ information literacy skill development in the First Year Seminar (FYS)

This project at St. Mary’s College of Maryland examined the relationship between librarian-faculty collaboration and students’ information literacy skill development in the FYS through student and librarian surveys, faculty interviews, and rubric-based assessment of student work. Students in FYS sections with greater librarian-faculty collaboration were more likely to use library resources and contact librarians, but were no better at information evaluation, integration or citation.

Veronica Arellano Douglas

Veronica Arellano Douglas, Reference & Instruction Librarian at St. Mary’s College of Maryland

Q&A with Veronica Arellano Douglas, Reference & Instruction Librarian

Q: What was your greatest challenge during the course of your Assessment in Action project?

A: I think our project team was most challenged by our need to create one common evaluative rubric that could be used across different research essays and First Year Seminar courses, all of which had diverse topics and assignments. We had to map the particular information literacy skills we wanted to assess against those reflected in each assignment and come to a consensus in terms of categories and criteria. It was a time-consuming and thought-provoking task.

Q: What is your #1 recommendation for other librarians who want to conduct an assessment project on student learning and success?

A: I would recommend that if there is not a librarian at your institution well-versed in statistical analysis that you either invest in training for yourself or a team member, or partner with faculty or staff on campus with a background in social science or education statistics.

Q: What is the #1 thing you gained through your participation in Assessment in Action?

A: Our participation in AiA helped us forge great working relationships with faculty outside of the library and solidified the library’s inclusion in the our college‘s larger assessment efforts.

© 2014 ACRL Value of Academic Libraries Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha