During the Value of Academic Libraries update session at ALA in San Francisco, Jennifer Fabbi (Library Dean, CSU San Marcos) and Carole Huston (Associate Provost, University of San Diego) shared their experience assessing information literacy within the framework of the WASC Senior College and University Commission. The presentation as well as sample assignments and rubrics are available here: http://biblio.csusm.edu/ilcore

Dr. Fabbi did the math for us on how libraries' contributions to accreditation add value

Dr. Fabbi did the math for us on how libraries’ contributions to accreditation processes add value

ALA Annual: Information Literacy as a Core Competency

 Events, Institutional Reputation/Prestige  Comments Off on ALA Annual: Information Literacy as a Core Competency
Jun 152015
 

At the Update on Value of Academic Libraries Initiative session at ALA Annual in San Francisco, the Value of Academic Libraries committee will present a case study on including information literacy as a core competency in accreditation standards. Please join us on Sunday, June 28 from 1:00-2:30 p.m. in Moscone Convention Center room 2009.

One of the goals for the Value of Academic Libraries committee has been to raise the profile of libraries in accrediting processes, and the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) is an example of an accreditor that has included multiple library-related factors. A description of the session follows.


Information Literacy as a Core Competency: WASC Senior College and University Commission (SCUC) Accreditation Case Study
Discussants Jennifer Fabbi (Library Dean, CSU San Marcos) and Carole Huston (Associate Provost, University of San Diego) will discuss WASC SCUC’s recently updated handbook and its specific inclusion of information literacy as a core competency for student learning. Fabbi will focus on promising campus practices in assessing student learning in information literacy from the “bottom up,” having worked with over 60 WASC campus teams in the past three years. Huston will discuss USD’s engagement in piloting “embedded librarian” models within a core curriculum structure at first-year and advanced levels, providing an on-the-ground account of how WASC’s inclusion of libraries and librarians in its core competency planning has impacted student learning from a campus perspective.

Libraries and Accreditation

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Sep 052014
 

This post is from Peter McDonald, Dean of Library Services at Fresno State. He thanks Patty Iannuzzi and Theresa Byrd, whose conversations with him on this topic formed the ideas in the post below.

The accreditation commission Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), perhaps most effectively among all such agencies, has taken the a step toward fully including librarians in defining how academic institutions of higher learning have an impact on core competencies such as critical thinking and information literacy. WASC believes these have a direct impact on student engagement, retention, and graduation rates. Of course, these are areas where libraries already do, and in fact can continue to have, great impact. WASC has held several regional meetings over the past two years on evolving their standards where librarians from many diverse campuses were specifically invited to give input and help define meaningful rubrics on these and other competencies.

This emphasis by WASC, of course, has the added benefit of making most academic colleges and universities within the WASC region reach out to their own local libraries for greater support and partnership in accreditation efforts.

After looking at the WASC accreditation model, and in conversations with stakeholders about accreditation agencies elsewhere around the country, we’ve come to the conclusion that it may well serve our values work most if we don’t get hung up on the specific language in accreditation documentation that may lists requirements for accreditation in language other than ‘information literacy’. Though WASC specifically mentions information literacy, they also emphasize such critical student learning outcomes as undergraduate research,  critical thinking, inquiry and analysis, lifelong learning, writing proficiency and so on — all of which, in fact, are arenas of student success support where academic libraries, in collaboration with campus stakeholders, provide extensive services and referrals. (See for example: http://www.wascsenior.org/content/retreat-core-competencies-critical-thinking-and-information-literacy)  As academic librarians, we just need to message that these sorts of student centered foci are precisely what libraries are about already.

Using what we’ve learned working with WASC, we suggest we stop worrying about not being named specifically in accreditation documentation, or even in some cases removed from accreditation language, and get into the business of realizing we already have the  skills and the wherewithal to support any student outcome listed by any accreditation agency – by being nimble in using our many demonstrated skills to match whatever language the various regional agencies may use. Our role as central loci of student learning on our respective campuses therefore has many facets.

While librarians have had some success reaching out to, and influencing, accreditation discussions at WASC, it seems a salient take-away that academic libraries everywhere can play a stronger role in curriculum and course design best practices on our respective campuses, which doubtless would link back directly to almost any accreditation language irrespective of region. We firmly believe libraries are one of the most effective campus units that not only have a demonstrated impact on most all facets of curricular activities/outcomes regardless of discipline but we also bridge over to support and make successful co-curricular activities/outcomes so critical to student graduation and retention.

In the months ahead the ACRL Value Committee will be looking at ways to leverage the effective participation of librarians in WASC to provide broader documentation on how we actually do provide many existing services coast to coast, regardless of which agency we may belong to, that can show direct and indirect (correlative) impact on most all rubrics of student success well beyond the confines of information literacy.

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