An exciting C&RL Forum event is just around the corner. This forum will be an excellent opportunity to look closely at two recent studies that center in many ways on value and some of the learning outcomes often associated with student library experiences. 

C&RL Forum on Library Usage and Student Success
Live Wednesday, October 28, 2015 (Length: 60 minutes)
9am Pacific | 10am Mountain | 11am Central | 12pm Eastern

One of the most difficult issues librarians face is how to prove our value to the university. Join us for an author panel discussion of two College & Research Libraries articles which explore the ties between student library usage and success: “The Impact of Library Resource Utilization on Undergraduate Students’ Academic Performance” by Felly Chiteng Kot and Jennifer L. Jones and “Investigating the Relationship of Library Usage to Student Outcomes” by John K. Stemmer and David M. Mahan (preprint). The authors will share the findings of their studies.

The first study (Chiteng Kot and Jones) addressed the issue of self-selection bias by using propensity score matching to construct treatment and comparison groups with similar background characteristics. After controlling for a variety of factors, this study found that students in the treatment group (who used library resources at any level specified) had a higher first-term GPA compared to their counterparts in the comparison group (who did not use library resources at the corresponding levels). For the purposes of this study, library use included workstation logins, study room reservations, and research clinic attendance.

The second study analyzed data from non-anonymous user surveys on why and how often students used the library in conjunction with institutional data to conduct a regression analysis that identified multiple correlations between student outcomes and the library. Stemmer and Mahan found that the library factors associated with student outcomes change over the course of the four year undergraduate experience. Underclass students using the library as a place to study are more likely to have positive outcomes, whereas upper-class students see positive outcomes when using the library as an information resource.

Hashtag: #acrlsuccess


John K. Stemmer, PhD: John is the Director of Library Services at Bellarmine University.


Felly Chiteng Kot: Felly is the Institutional Research Analyst for the Office of the Provost at Nazarbayev University.

Jennifer L. Jones: Jennifer is the Assessment and User Experience Librarian in the University Library at Georgia State University.

David M. Mahan, PhD: David is the Assistant Provost and Executive Director of Institutional Effectiveness at Manhattan College.

Register to receive reminders and information or view the forum live on YouTube.



During the Value of Academic Libraries update session at ALA in San Francisco, Jennifer Fabbi (Library Dean, CSU San Marcos) and Carole Huston (Associate Provost, University of San Diego) shared their experience assessing information literacy within the framework of the WASC Senior College and University Commission. The presentation as well as sample assignments and rubrics are available here:

Dr. Fabbi did the math for us on how libraries' contributions to accreditation add value

Dr. Fabbi did the math for us on how libraries’ contributions to accreditation processes add value

Increase Your Commitment to Students; Seek a FIPSE Grant

 Library Impact on Students, Student Learning Outcomes  Comments Off on Increase Your Commitment to Students; Seek a FIPSE Grant
May 222014

The United States Department of Education’s Office of Postsecondary Education recently announced a new Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) competition First in the World (FITW). The program will provide multi-year grants to institutions of higher education to spur the development of innovations that improve educational outcomes, make college more affordable for students and families, and develop an evidence base of effective practices. The grant announcement explains that innovations can take many forms, such as those that improve teaching and learning by redesigning courses and student supports or by leveraging technological developments.

The FITW competition aims to increase postsecondary access, affordability and completion for underrepresented, underprepared or low-income students at institutions across the country. Applications are due June 30, and FIPSE is holding pre-application webinars May 28 and June 4 from 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. EDT. See the First in the World website and the official Federal Register Notice for more details.

While ACRL is not eligible to apply, academic librarians could work with their own institutions and consortia to seek FITW funding. With $75 million dollars available, this could be a powerful mechanism for you to implement innovative strategies and effective practices which improve student outcomes. Use FITW as a catalyst to transform student learning, pedagogy, and instructional practices through creative and innovative collaborations on your campus. Leverage this as an opportunity to demonstrate alignment with and impact on institutional outcomes.

Think of ACRL when you develop your proposal. We can serve as a contractor to support your project in the following ways:

You may think of other ways ACRL could support you through our existing programs and services. Or perhaps you would benefit from having ACRL involved in a new way, as a full partner to offer more substantial support. To pursue any of these options as you develop your FITW proposals, be in touch with Kara Malenfant, ACRL’s senior strategist for special initiatives at or 800-545-2433 ext 2510.

© 2014 ACRL Value of Academic Libraries Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha