Entries from January 2009 ↓

ACRL honors Information Literacy innovators

CHICAGO — In honor of the 10th anniversary of its popular Information Literacy Immersion Program, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) will present a Special Presidential Recognition Award to the founding members of the Institute for Information Literacy Steering Committee and Immersion faculty at the ACRL 14th National Conference in Seattle. Committee and faculty members will be recognized and presented with certificates acknowledging their contributions to ACRL at the keynote session at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, March 13.

Members of the founding Steering Committee are Louis Albert, Lori Arp, Esther Grassian, Thomas Kirk, Cerise Oberman (chair), Shelly Phipps, Loanne Snavely, Mitch Stepanovich, Julie Todaro, Karen Williams and Lizabeth “Betsy” Wilson.

Founding faculty members are Eugene Engeldinger, Debra Gilchrist, Randy Hensley, Joan Kaplowitz, Sharon Mader, Mary Jane Petrowski and Karen Williams. The faculty has grown to include Craig Gibson, Carol Hansen, Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe, John Holmes, Mary MacDonald, Megan Oaklfeaf, Tiffani Travis, Dane Ward, Beth S. Woodard, Susan Barnes Whyte and Anne Zald.

“Ten years ago, the first Immersion Program was held at SUNY Plattsburgh. Since then 1,073 librarians have been selected to participate in this competitive program,” said ACRL President Erika Linke. “It is not only the programs that have made a difference. The faculty engaged in developing the first program and subsequent faculty have further developed a program that has matured and deepened. Given the importance that this initiative has had on academic librarians and ACRL, I would like to recognize the contributions of the founding members of the Institute for Information Literacy Steering Committee and the faculty memberswho have contributed to the success of this program.”

The ACRL Institute for Information Literacy Immersion Program provides instruction librarians the opportunity to work intensively for four-and-a-half days on all aspects of information literacy. The program currently consists of teacher, program, intentional teacher and assessment tracks. The tracks offer a wide range of intellectual tools and practical techniques to help build or enhance instruction programs. Visit the ACRL Web site for more information on the ACRL Institute for Information Literacy Immersion Program.

Contact: Margot Conahan
ACRL
312-280-2522
mconahan@ala.org

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The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing nearly 13,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/.

New look, updated content for ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has released an updated version of its popular Scholarly Communication Toolkit in a new format and with updated content. The toolkit continues to provide context and background by summarizing key issues to offer quick, basic information on scholarly communication topics. It also links to examples of specific tools, including handouts, presentations and videos for libraries to adapt and use on their own campuses. The ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit is freely available at http://www.acrl.ala.org/scholcomm/.

“Library services involve education of the next generation, infrastructure for long term knowledge access and advocacy for rights and practices that lead to a sustainable system of scholarly peer-review, its distribution and preservation,” explains Kim Douglas, university librarian at California Institute of Technology and co-chair of ACRL’s Scholarly Communication Committee. “The ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit supports library staff seeking to align their programs with an essential byproduct of their parent institutions — the creation, protection, dissemination and archiving of new knowledge.”

“Given the current economic climate, it’s natural to ask if scholarly communication activities are a luxury or a distraction,” said Richard Fyffe, librarian of the college for Grinnell College and co-chair of ACRL’s Scholarly Communication Committee. “We define scholarly communications issues as central to the mission of virtually every kind of academic library because they are central to the mission of our institutions. We feel libraries need to maintain a commitment to awareness, understanding, ownership and activism.”

The updated toolkit serves as a resource for scholarly communication discussions inside the library, outreach programs to faculty and administrators and library school students seeking to incorporate these issues into their course work. The ACRL Scholarly Communication Committee, as part of its efforts to keep the toolkit current, encourages librarians to contribute tools and case studies on their local scholarly communication campaigns. Simply post a comment describing your tool and provide a link in the appropriate tab.

The ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit is available online at http://www.acrl.ala.org/scholcomm/.

Contact: Kara J. Malenfant
ACRL Scholarly Communications & Government Relations Specialist
(312) 280-2510
kmalenfant@ala.org

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ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, representing nearly 13,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.

ACRL announces spring 2009 e-learning schedule

CHICAGO – The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is offering a wide variety of online learning opportunities in spring 2009 to meet the demands of your schedule and budget. Full details and registration information are available on the ACRL Web site at http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/proftools/elearning.cfm.
ACRL online seminars are asynchronous, multi-week courses delivered through Moodle. Online seminars scheduled for spring 2009 include:

Instructional Design for Online Teaching and Learning (Feb. 2-28, 2009)
In this four week hands-on course the intellectual focus will be on using good instructional design and Web page design principles. Participants will also be introduced to Web-based Teaching techniques and materials using standard Web pages and the Moodle LMS.

Copyright and the Library, Part 1: The Basics Including Fair Use (Feb. 2 – 27, 2009)
In this course, students will learn to think in terms of U.S. copyright law. Students will focus on building understanding of current copyright law, creating a “copyright palette” for their libraries and assessing a library’s legal risk with regard to current U.S. copyright law. Additionally, students will build an understanding of the Fair Use clause, as well as how to legally apply fair use in the library, classroom and broader campus environments.

Web Design and Construction for Libraries Part 1: XHTML and CSS (March 2-28, 2009)
Participants in this four-week seminar will learn how to plan, design and develop content for Web sites in an academic setting. XHTML and CSS (external) will be introduced. Participants will end the session with a completed Web site plan and design and a main Web page with at least two subpages that illustrate how the design will be implemented.

Introduction to Website Usability (March 23 – April 10, 2009)
For very little investment in staff hours and training you can reap tremendous benefits by connecting with the users of your library Web site and Web-based applications through usability testing. This three-week course is designed for librarians or library IT staff who are interested in setting up a usability program but doesn’t know where to begin.
In addition, ACRL offers a variety of timely live Webcasts addressing hot topics in academic librarianship. Webcasts last from an hour and a half to two hours and take place in an interactive online classroom. Group discounts are available for all ACRL e-learning Webcasts. Spring 2009 Webcasts include:

Blended Librarianship (Design Thinking) (Jan. 13, 2009)
This Webcast examines how librarians can further integrate themselves into the instructional process at their college or university by utilizing current and emerging instructional technologies to connect with faculty and students, designing instruction to enhance learning and developing partnerships with staff from teaching and learning as well as teaching and technology centers.

The Role of the Librarian in Combating Student Plagiarism (Feb. 5, 2009)
Like other educators, librarians are aware of the growing instances of student plagiarism and academic dishonesty that take place on college campuses. Librarians frequently anecdotally discuss discipline faculty’s revulsion toward the growth of student plagiarism that has seemingly grown in tandem with our society’s dependence on digital texts found on the Internet. This seminar discusses strategies libraries and librarians can implement to reduce plagiarism on campus.

Information Commons 101 (Feb. 24, 2009)
Is your institution in the planning phase for a library renovation or addition that includes a space that will serve as an information or learning commons? If so, this Webcast will provide an overview of some of the key planning components you should take into consideration as you develop a program for the facility.
Registration for all ACRL e-learning events opens approximately one month prior to the start dates. Complete details and registration information is available online at http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/proftools/elearning.cfm. Contact Jon Stahler at jstahler@ala.org or (312) 280-2511 with questions about ACRL e-learning opportunities.

Contact: Jon Stahler
ACRL
(312) 280-2511
jstahler@ala.org

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The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing nearly 13,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/.

New ACRL publication: Design Talk

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has released  a new publication, “Design Talk: Understanding the Roles of Usability Practitioners, Web Designers, and Web Developers in User-Centered Web Design,” by Brenda Reeb, coordinator of the Web usability program at the University of Rochester Libraries.

“Design Talk” focuses on the interactions between the various roles in Web site development, delineating the scope of responsibilities and activities of usability practitioners, designers and developers. The book sheds light on the benefits of understanding the differences between these roles and how they work together to create user-friendly Web sites. “Design Talk” provides descriptions of, and instructions for conducting, different types of usability tests along with in-depth discussion of Web design issues.

Reeb’s workpresents an alternative to Web design by committee and is suitable for those with a vested interest in Web content, including reference librarians, usability practitioners and Web design professionals. Library administrators who want to create clearer lines of authority among staff participating in the Web design process will also find the book useful.

“Design Talk” is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store (http://www.alastore.ala.org), by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers and will be available at the 2009 ALA Midwinter Meeting in Denver.

Contact: Kathryn J. Deiss
ACRL Content Strategist
(312) 280-2529
kdeiss@ala.org

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ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, representing nearly 13,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.