Entries from January 2008 ↓

ACRL announces 2008 ACRL/Harvard Leadership Institute scholarships

CHICAGO – The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is pleased to announce the availability of two scholarships for the 2008 ACRL/Harvard Leadership Institute, which will be held in Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 3-8. In support of ACRL’s commitment to librarians serving diverse communities, these two scholarships are for individuals currently working in historically black colleges and universities; tribal colleges or universities; and/or hispanic serving institutions. The deadline to apply is Feb. 29.

The Institute
The Institute is an intensive program held on the campus of Harvard University. The goal of the ACRL/Harvard Leadership Institute is to increase participants’ capacity to lead and manage. For six highly engaging days, participants will study, talk and attend classes. Participants work with program faculty and with other participants, testing new ideas and developing new strategies for taking institutions into the future. The ACRL/Harvard Leadership Institute is designed for directors of libraries and those who report directly to them in positions such as associate university librarian or assistant library dean. The program will also be useful for others who are regularly involved in senior-level decision making affecting the entire library operation and involving other important relationships on campus. Complete details about the program are online at www.ala.org/acrl/events (Click “Harvard Institute”).

Scholarships
The purpose of the scholarships is to support the participation of academic and research librarians from the historically black colleges and universities; tribal colleges and universities; or hispanic serving institutions. The scholarship covers the cost of tuition to the Institute ($2,300 value). Expenses for travel and lodging will be the responsibility of the participant.

Criteria
Scholarship applicants must:

  • be current ACRL members.
  • be employed at a historically black college or university; tribal college or university; or hispanic serving institution.
  • complete the online scholarship application form.
  • submit a brief written statement that describes how participation in the Institute will contribute to his or her leadership development or define three ways in which the Institute will help improve her or his leadership effectiveness.
  • demonstrate that they have support from their institution to attend the Institute by submitting a brief statement of support from an appropriate supervisor/manager/director at the institution.

How to Apply
Complete the application form available at: https://marvin.foresightint.com/surveys/Tier1Survey/ACRL/239.

Deadline
The deadline to apply is Feb. 29. Notifications will be issued in late March 2008.

Questions
Please contact Margot Conahan at mconahan@ala.org or 312-280-2522 if you have any questions or need additional details.

ACRL is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing more than 13,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.

Peter Hernon named ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year

CHICAGO – Dr. Peter Hernon, professor in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at Simmons College, is the 2008 Association of College and Research Libraries’ (ACRL) Academic/Research Librarian of the Year. The award, sponsored by YBP Library Services, recognizes an outstanding member of the library profession who has made a significant national or international contribution to academic/research librarianship and library development.

Hernon will receive a $5,000 award on Monday, June 30, at the ACRL President’s Program at the American Library Association Annual Conference in Anaheim.

“Dr. Peter Hernon was selected because of his substantive body of research over a career of more than 30 years. His research, publications and presentations significantly impact the library profession,” said award committee Chair Cynthia Steinhoff, library director at the Anne Arundel Community College in Arnold, Md. “He informs us and helps us to face the challenges that lie ahead. He helps us to determine the role of libraries and librarians in the future. Dr. Hernon’s work, which focuses on such varied topics as assessment, government information, service quality and leadership, addresses very real issues and questions that academic librarians face every day.”

“I am humbled by the receipt of this prestigious award and recognition of the body of research and other scholarly writings that I have produced since 1972,” said Hernon. “I continue to conduct research, as there is so much that I still want to continue to learn. As someone who has spent almost his entire career in the profession serving as an LIS educator, this award takes on added significance to me. It reflects that the so-called divide between those in practice and those of us in education need not be great. I appreciate recognition of my scholarship for its contribution both to theory and practice. I enjoy working with library directors and other staff and believe that the award is confirmation of my continued close association with practice.”

Hernon has a distinguished record of service to the profession. His research and presentations in the areas of customer service and assessment have assisted many academic libraries in improving the quality of their user relationships. He has published extensively on such topics as library leadership and government information issues, as well as service quality. His 1998 book “Assessing Service Quality: Satisfying the Expectations of Library Customers” was the unanimous winner of the Highsmith Library Literature Award for its outstanding contribution to the body of library literature. A 2007 survey published in College & Research Libraries listed Hernon as the fifth most cited author in LIS journals from 1994-2004. Dr. Hernon’s writings have been translated into several languages, including Japanese and Korean.

From 1993-2002, Hernon acted as editor-in-chief of the Journal of Academic Librarianship and is currently co-editor of Library & Information Science Research. He previously served on the editorial boards of College & Research Libraries and Publications in Librarianship, as well as the advisory committee for ALA Editions.

Dr. Hernon served on the faculty at Simmons from 1978 through 1983 and returned in 1986 after a stint at the University of Arizona. His major teaching interests include government information, including information policy; the role of research; reflective inquiry, research design and research methods; evaluation of library services; and academic libraries. He has also acted as a visiting professor in the library and information studies programs at Victoria University in Wellington, New Zealand; the University of Arizona in Tucson; and the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

Currently, he serves as lead professor at Simmons College for the newly created Ph.D. program, Managerial Leadership in the Information Professions, which began in 2005 with a multi-year grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The innovative program focuses on creating successful future leaders in library and information settings and generating rigorous research to improve the knowledge base and practice of managerial leadership. This program involves faculty from Simmons and professors of practice-leading practitioners in the profession.

Hernon received his B.A and M.A. in History from the University of Colorado – Boulder in 1966 and 1968, respectively. He earned his M.A. in Library Science from the University of Denver in 1971, and Ph.D. from Indiana University in 1978.

The award dates back to 1978, and recent award winners include Lizabeth (Betsy) Wilson (2007); Ray English (2006); Ravindra Nath (R. N.) Sharma (2005); Tom Kirk (2004); Ross Atkinson, (2003); Shelley Phipps, (2002); and Larry Hardesty (2001).

For more information regarding the ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year award, or a complete list of past recipients, please visit http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlawards/acrllibrarian.htm.

Contact: Megan Griffin
ACRL Program Coordinator
mgriffin@ala.org

ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, representing 13,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.

ACRL Excellence in Academic Libraries winners announced

CHICAGO – The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2008 Excellence in Academic Libraries Award. Sponsored by ACRL and Blackwell’s Book Services, the award recognizes the staff of a college, university and community college library for programs that deliver exemplary services and resources to further the educational mission of the institution.

“Receiving an Excellence in Academic Libraries Award is a national tribute to a library and its staff for the outstanding services, programs and leadership they provide to their students, administrators, faculty and community,” said Mary Ellen K. Davis, ACRL executive director.

This year’s recipients are the Shatford Library at Pasadena City College, Pasadena, Calif.; the Laurence McKinley Gould Library at Carleton College, Northfield, Minn.; and the McMaster University Libraries, Hamilton, Ontario.

The Shatford Library at Pasadena City College, winner of the community college category, was recognized for continually working to enhance students’ experiences at the library.

“Innovative is the best word to describe why Shatford Library won this award. It excels in its information competency work and it provides new technologies to advance the academic success of Pasadena Community College students,” said Camila Alire, chair of the 2008 Excellence in Academic Libraries Selection Committee and Dean Emerita, University of New Mexico & Colorado State University.

“Pasadena City College’s Shatford Library is honored to have been chosen for the 2008 Excellence in Academic Libraries Award,” said Mary Ann Laun, assistant dean at Shatford Library. “This award celebrates the collaborative work of our library faculty and staff in the delivery of quality instructional programs, resources and services to the College’s 30,000 students and to our community. It also recognizes the commitment to planning and evaluation of services that directly support the college’s motto, “Student Success, Our Top Priority.”

The Laurence McKinley Gould Library at Carleton College, winner of the college category, impressed the selection committee with its use of technology in the library.

“The Gould Library at Carleton College was recognized for working hard in a team atmosphere in order to provide a welcoming environment for its students and faculty by utilizing technology to enhance space, services, and resources,” said Alire.

“To us, this award is all about esprit de corps within the library, and partnerships in the college community and beyond,” said Samuel Demas, college librarian at Carleton College. “The Gould library staff works hard to nurture a culture of creative collaboration, and every day it models the teamwork that underlies superb service. It is a thrill for us to receive this validation of our values and of our efforts to serve the Carleton community.”

The McMaster University Libraries, winner of the university category, was selected for its focus on user-centered innovations and services.

“McMaster University Libraries exemplifies a successful transformation from a traditional research library to an innovative, user-centered library using technological advances to accomplish its goals,” said Alire.

“Receiving this international recognition stands as tribute to the hard work and dedication of the staff here at the McMaster University Libraries,” said Jeffrey Trzeciak, university librarian at McMaster University. “Its commitment to excellence and innovation is evident in all it does to advance the mission of the university. By winning this award we can proudly say to our faculty, students and the entire campus community that you have -and deserve -the very best!”

Each winning library will receive $3,000 and a plaque, to be presented at an award ceremony held on each recipient’s campus. The winners also will receive special recognition at the ACRL President’s Program during the American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference at 1:30 p.m. Monday, June 30, in Anaheim, Calif.

Contact: Megan Griffin
ACRL Program Coordinator
mgriffin@ala.org

ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, representing 13,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.

ACRL Insider launches

CHICAGO – The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is pleased to announce the debut of a new weblog, ACRL Insider. The blog is available online at http://www.acrl.ala.org/acrlinsider.

The mission of ACRL Insider is to keep ACRL members and other interested parties current and informed on the activities, services and programs of the association. ACRL Insider features information on publications, events, conferences and eLearning opportunities, along with podcasts and other media. With the launch of this new communication tool, ACRL hopes to foster openness and transparency by providing an outlet for connection between members and staff. In order to encourage a collaborative environment, all ACRL Insider posts allow for reader comments and suggestions.

“We are pleased to add another opportunity to dialogue with members and others interested in the business of ACRL. I encourage academic and research librarians to subscribe to ACRL Insider and to share your responses to our posts,” said Mary Ellen K. Davis, Executive Director, ACRL.

ACRL Insider focuses on communicating information about the association to members and the wider academic library community, while the existing ACRLog weblog (http://www.acrlblog.org/) continues to address the issues of the day in the field of academic and research librarianship. The blogs work in tandem to provide a big picture view of the association and academic librarianship.

ACLR Insider is available for subscription by RSS at http://feeds.feedburner.com/acrlinsider or through email by visiting http://www.acrl.ala.org/acrlinsider.

Contact: David Free
ACRL
(312) 280-2517
dfree@ala.org

ACRL is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing more than 13,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.

New ACRL publication examines information literacy in digital age

CHICAGO – The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is pleased to announce the publication of Information Literacy Programs in the Digital Age: Educating College and University Students Online, edited by Alice Daugherty and Michael F. Russo of Louisiana State University.

Information Literacy Programs in the Digital Age is a showcase of 24 unique online information literacy projects from community colleges, research universities and liberal arts colleges. Readers will find a wide array of program types, subject bases and institutional drivers in this rich compendium. Chapter authors discuss the development of online information literacy courses and tutorials, along with best practices for embedding information literacy instruction into discipline courses and programs.

This book is essential reading for any librarian charged with planning and implementing an online information literacy program. Librarians already working in online tutorial design, campus collaboration in online learning environments or the refinement of effective online information literacy programs will also find much to learn.

Information Literacy Programs in the Digital Age is available through the ALA Online Store at http://www.alastore.ala.org, and will be available for purchase in the ALA Bookstore at the ALA Midwinter Meeting 2008 in Philadelphia.

Contact: Kathryn J. Deiss
ACRL Content Strategist
(312)280-2529
kdeiss@ala.org

ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, representing 13,500 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.

New ACRL title: Library 2.0 Initiatives in Academic Libraries

CHICAGO – The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is pleased to announce a unique and exciting publication, Library 2.0 Initiatives in Academic Libraries. Library 2.0 Initiatives in Academic Libraries is a hybrid book and wiki presenting 12 case studies of significant applications of Library 2.0 in academic libraries. The publication details a wide range of applications of emerging technologies, such as blogs, wikis, podcasts, IM, RSS, XML, Web services, mashups and social computing.

Chapter authors from three countries describe varied uses of networked social software and open data formats to distribute and add value to library resources and services. Case studies detail 2.0 ways of pedagogy and the provision of services in physical and online spaces where students congregate, discuss online catalog enhancements and outline the creation of feature-rich interfaces for accessing digital research collections.

In order to keep information current, the authors will provide regular updates on their initiatives for at least two years through a wiki hosted by ACRL. Project editor Laura B. Cohen, Web support librarian at the University at Albany, SUNY, conceived of the hybrid concept in an effort to make the cases available in their living forms, offering academic librarians and teaching faculty opportunities to learn from the ongoing efforts of the authors and engage in discussion of the projects. Visit the wiki online at http://acrl.ala.org/L2Initiatives.

Library 2.0 Initiatives in Academic Libraries is available in a soft-cover print edition from the ALA Online Store at http://www.alastore.ala.org and will be available for purchase in the ALA Bookstore at the ALA Midwinter Meeting 2008 in Philadelphia.

Contact:
Kathryn J. Deiss
ACRL Content Strategist
(312)280-2528
kdeiss@ala.org

ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, representing 13,500 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.

ACRL explores the future of academic libraries

CHICAGO – The 2007 environmental scan by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) explores the current atmosphere in the world of academic and research libraries along with trends that will define the future of academic and research librarianship and the research environment. The report is available online at http://www.acrl.org/ala/acrl/acrlpubs/whitepapers/Environmental_Scan_2.pdf.

The document builds on earlier ACRL reports, including “Top Issues Facing Academic Libraries” (http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/publications/crlnews/2002/nov/topissuesfacing.cfm), issued in 2002, and the 2003 environmental scan. The 2007 environmental scan is organized around the ACRL’s top-10 assumptions about the future of academic and research libraries and librarians (


http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/publications/crlnews/2007/apr/tenassumptions.cfm

), first released in March 2007. This newly expanded narrative identifies several emerging issues, in addition to those detailed in the previously issued document, which will increasingly impact the work of academic and research libraries and librarians, including:

  • Broader collaboration among academic, public, special and school librarians on topics of common concern, such as public engagement and media literacy
  • Library facilities and services growing increasingly integrated with research, teaching and learning programs across campus, including information technology and student services.
  • The increasing needs of e-science and e-scholarship in the social sciences and the humanities, requiring new approaches to the design and delivery of core library services.
  • Increasing collaboration between academic libraries and university publication programs as their roles become increasingly complementary.
  • The shifting focus for academic libraries from the creation and management of large, on-site library collections to the design and delivery of library services.
  • The tools and techniques of social computing providing new opportunities for the design and delivery of library resources and services but putting more of a burden on library staff and systems.

While much has changed in the academic and research library environment since the publication of the last ACRL environmental scan in 2003, many previously noted issues remain relevant to practice, such as the increasing role for librarians in educational programs, both formal and informal; the impact of digitization programs; changes in the publishing industry and the broader environment for scholarly communication; new approaches to research, teaching and learning on campus; and the call for accountability in higher education.

Please share your thoughts and reactions to the issues identified in the 2007 environmental scan in an open discussion during the 2008 ALA Midwinter Meeting in Philadelphia from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 13, at Loews Philadelphia in room Congress C.

ACRL is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing more than 13,500 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.