Entries Tagged 'Research' ↓

ACRL releases Value of Academic Libraries report

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the release of “Value of Academic Libraries: A Comprehensive Research Review and Report.” Developed for ACRL by Megan Oakleaf of the iSchool at Syracuse University, this valuable resource reviews the quantitative and qualitative literature, methodologies and best practices currently in place for demonstrating the value of academic libraries. The full report, along with supplemental materials, is available online at http://www.acrl.ala.org/value/.

Increasing recognition of the value of libraries and librarians by leaders in higher education, information technology, funding agencies and campus decision makers is one of ACRL’s six strategic priorities. Recognizing the sense of urgency around this issue, the report is intended to help academic librarians participate in the conversation and to identify resources to support them in demonstrating the value of academic libraries in clear, measurable ways.

“This report presents the vision and the reality of the value of academic libraries and their contributions to institutional goals and outcomes,” said ACRL President Lisa Hinchliffe of the University of Illinois at Urbana – Champaign. “Through it, we have a shared knowledge base for the association and our members as we pursue this strategic priority.”

The primary objective of this comprehensive review is to provide academic librarians and institutional leaders with a clearer understanding of what research about the performance of academic libraries already exists and where gaps in this research occur. The report additionally identifies the most promising best practices and measures correlated to performance and represents a starting point to assist college, university and community college librarians in gathering evidence to tell the story of their libraries and promote dialogue on the value of the academic library in higher education.

“Documenting the evidence we have for the impact of academic libraries on student, faculty and institutional success will enable library leaders to respond proactively to calls for accountability and return on investment. Identifying the gaps charts a path for the data we need to gather and analyze,” explained Hinchliffe. “In the coming months, ACRL will be turning its attention to strategies for pursuing the research agenda recommended in the report, identifying funding sources for projects and developing training and support materials for our members.”

The full report is now available on the ACRL website, along with a separate executive summary for distribution to campus decision makers, a bibliography of sources consulted in the development of the report, a podcast interview with Hinchliffe and Oakleaf and links to additional resources. Visit http://www.acrl.ala.org/value/ for complete information on this exciting new resource.

Hinchliffe and Oakleaf are available for media interviews and group presentations highlighting the report. Contact ACRL Communications Specialist David Free at dfree@ala.org for more information and to schedule interviews and presentations.

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The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association (ALA) representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

Explore the future with ACRL

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has released a new report, “Futures Thinking for Academic Librarians: Higher Education in 2025,” to prompt academic librarians to consider what trends may impact the future of higher education in order to take strategic action now. The report is available on the ACRL Web site at http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/issues/value/futures.cfm.

Authored by David J. Staley, director of the Harvey Goldberg Center for Excellence in Teaching in the History Department of Ohio State University, and Kara J. Malenfant, ACRL scholarly communications and government relations specialist, the report presents 26 possible scenarios for the future which may have an impact on all types of academic libraries over the next 15 years. The scenarios are based on implications assessment of current trends and reflect a variety of potential futures for higher education.

“We felt it was important to focus on the long term future out as a way for academic librarians to open their minds and free their thinking,” said ACRL President Lori A. Goetsch of Kansas State University. “The possible futures outlined in the report provide an excellent opportunity to imagine what our world may look like in the next decade and apply that imagination to the current strategic planning process.”

The scenarios represent a variety of themes relating to academic culture, demographics, distance education, funding, globalization, infrastructure/facilities, libraries, political climate, publishing industry, societal values, students/learning and technology. They are organized in a “scenario space” visualization tool, reflecting the expert judgment of ACRL members as to their expectations and perceptions about the probability, impact, speed of change and threat/opportunity potential of each scenario. The study focuses on implications of these futures for academic libraries and includes a step-by-step activity for academic librarians to undertake scenario thinking in their libraries.

For more information on the report and futures research, listen to a podcast conversation with the authors on the ACRL Insider blog.

Contact:  Kara J. Malenfant
ACRL Scholarly Communications and Government Relations Specialist
(312) 280-2510
kmalenfant@ala.org

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ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

ACRL selects value of academic libraries researcher

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the selection of Megan Oakleaf, assistant professor in the iSchool at Syracuse University, as lead researcher for its value of academic libraries project. A recognized expert in outcomes-based assessment and decision making, Oakleaf will develop and deliver a comprehensive review of the quantitative and qualitative literature, methodologies and best practices currently in place for demonstrating the value of academic libraries.

“ACRL is very pleased to work with Megan Oakleaf on this project,” said ACRL President Lori A. Goetsch of Kansas State University. “Her experience and expertise in assessment make her the ideal person to review and document existing research and practices to assist the academic library community in articulating our value to the campus community.”

The current economic climate and the increased emphasis on assessment and outcomes have compelled academic departments’ higher education administrators to make tough decisions regarding the funding of programs and units at their institutions. The primary objective of the comprehensive review is to provide academic librarians with a clearer understanding of what research about the performance of academic libraries already exists, where gaps in this research occur, and to identify the most promising best practices and measures correlated to performance. Additionally, this review will provide ACRL members with tools and strategies to demonstrate the value of academic libraries to their institutional leadership.

Send questions about the ACRL value of academic libraries project to Mary Ellen K. Davis, ACRL executive director, at mdavis@ala.org or (312) 280-3248, or to Kara Malenfant, ACRL scholarly communications/government relations specialist, at kmalenfant@ala.org or (312) 280-2510.

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ACRL is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing nearly 13,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.