Entries Tagged 'Publications' ↓

ACRL receives Delmas Foundation grant for RBML online archive

CHICAGO – The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has received a grant from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation to provide digitized archives of Rare Books & Manuscripts Librarianship (RBML). The grant provides $3,000 in funding to assist in making volumes 1-12 of RBML, the predecessor of RBM: A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage, discoverable and available online through the HighWire Press platform, completing the publication’s online archive.

“I am thrilled that ACRL received this generous grant,” said RBM editor Beth Whittaker, head of the Spencer Research Library at the University of Kansas. “The RBM editorial board, along with ALA and ACRL, is indebted to the Delmas Foundation for choosing to fund this important project. We look forward to contributing the full archive of RBML to the online library literature.”

The 24 back issues will join volumes 13 and 14 of RBML and the full run of RBM online. Whittaker and the staff of the University of Kansas Libraries completed the scanning of the RBML back content over the past year.

RBML and RBM are the two journals in which librarians and library school students can find many of the most important articles that have been written about rare books and special collections librarianship since 1986,” said Henry Raine, chair of ACRL’s Rare Books & Manuscripts Section (RBMS) and head of library technical services at the New York Historical Society. “Having the entire run of these publications freely available online will greatly facilitate additional scholarship in our field, and will be an invaluable resource for RBMS members and all others interested in rare books, manuscripts and special collections.”

“ACRL is very appreciative of the work of the RBM editorial board and the Rare Books & Manuscripts Section members in advancing this project,” said ACRL Executive Director Mary Ellen Davis. “ACRL is able to accomplish such a diverse range of projects thanks to the many talented members who so generously volunteer their time.”

Access to all content, with the exception of the two most current issues, will be freely available to all. Online access to the current two issues is available only to RBM subscribers. The full run of RBML is expected to be available in early 2011. The journals are available online at http://rbm.acrl.org.

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ACRL is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation is concerned generally with encouraging excellence in scholarship and the arts, and is particularly interested in wide access to research library collections, the quality of dance performance, and the study and performance of early music. The foundation reflects Gladys Krieble and Jean Paul Delmas’ devotion to New York City and Venice as well as recognizing and supporting the major interests of the donors’ lives: the humanities, research libraries and the performing arts in New York City. The foundation is online at http://www.delmas.org/.

New ACRL publication: Best Practices for Credit-Bearing Information Literacy Courses

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of “Best Practices for Credit-Bearing Information Literacy Courses.” Edited by Christopher Hollister, the work is a collection of previously unpublished papers in which contributing authors describe and recommend best practices for creating, developing and teaching credit-bearing information literacy (IL) courses at the college and university level.

Contributors include academic librarians from universities, four-year colleges and community colleges, who demonstrate successful IL course endeavors at their respective institutions. “Best Practices for Credit-Bearing Information Literacy Courses” includes several case studies of both classroom and online IL courses. Some are elective and some required, some are discipline-specific and others are integrated into academic programs or departments. Contributors discuss useful and effective methods for developing, teaching, assessing and marketing courses. Also included are chapters on theoretical approaches to credit-bearing IL courses and their history in higher education. Organized around three themes–create, develop and teach–this book provides practitioners and administrators with a start-to-finish guide to best practices for credit-bearing IL courses.

“Best Practices for Credit-Bearing Information Literacy Courses” is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

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The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

2009 Academic Library Trends and Statistics now available from ACRL

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of “2009 Academic Library Trends and Statistics,” the latest in a series of annual publications that describe the collections, staffing, expenditures and service activities of academic libraries in all Carnegie classifications. The three-volume set includes associate of arts institutions, master’s colleges and universities/baccalaureate colleges and research/doctoral-granting institutions. The individual volumes for associates colleges, masters/baccalaureate and doctoral-granting institutions are also available for purchase.

The 2009 survey includes data from 1,533 academic libraries in six major categories:

- Collections (including volumes, serials, multimedia)
- Expenditures (library materials, wages and salaries, other operating)
- Electronic Resources (including expenditures, collections, services, usage)
- Personnel and Public Services (staff and services)
- Ph.D.s Granted, Faculty, Student Enrollment
- Faculty Rank, Status, and Tenure for Librarians

The survey also provides analysis of selected variables and summary data (high, low, mean and median) for all elements. The 2009 data can be used for self-studies, budgeting, strategic planning, annual reports, grant applications and benchmarking.

“2009 Academic Library Trends and Statistics” is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers. Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org or (312) 280-2523 with questions.

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The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association, representing nearly 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

New ACRL publication: Web Research in Academic Libraries

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of “Web Research in Academic Libraries” (CLIP Note #41). This exciting new title provides useful information on teaching Web research strategies in information literacy instruction.

In the increasingly complex electronic information environment, undergraduates gravitate to the Web for their information needs. Complied by Rebecca Sullivan of Luther College, “Web Research in Academic Libraries” examines to what extent and in what ways academic libraries have incorporated Web search strategies into their information literacy instruction programs. The book compiles descriptions and sample documents of current practices from college libraries of all sizes, including information on Web evaluation and assessment. The title is suitable for community college, college and university libraries as well as a pedagogical tool for library and information schools.

Web Research in Academic Libraries” (CLIP Note #41) is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

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The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association (ALA) representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

New from ACRL – The Expert Library: Staffing, Sustaining, and Advancing the Academic Library in the 21st Century

CHICAGOThe Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of “The Expert Library: Staffing, Sustaining, and Advancing the Academic Library in the 21st Century,” edited by Scott Walter and Karen Williams.

In the midst of a decade of extraordinary change in academic libraries — change driven by information technology, new approaches to teaching and learning, new models for scholarly communication and new expectations for the ways we will discover, share and use information — there is nothing as important to the future of the library and its continued place at the heart of the academic enterprise than its people and the expertise that they bring to the design, development and delivery of library services.

What will those services be and who will provide them? “The Expert Library” provides an overview of the changing dynamics of recruiting and retaining academic library professionals for the 21st century. The thought-provoking book provides fresh thinking and insights into what will be required to ensure continued library relevance and success through its people.
“Academic libraries are about a shifting array of professional, technical and support personnel who bring critical expertise and experience to both the sustained responsibilities and the new roles that higher education libraries are advancing,” writes James G. Neal, vice president for information services and university librarian at Columbia University, in the foreword. “This volume, for the first time, brings together fresh thinking and insights about what will be required to advance library relevance and success through people.”
In 13 engaging essays, “The Expert Library” draws on the experience of academic librarians looking back over a decade of research and innovation, during which the profession has struggled to identify both its core competencies and the areas of professional expertise needed to support programs in scholarly communications, assessment, information literacy instruction, data curation, strategic communication and assessment.
Providing a lens for viewing discussions of the academic library job market, the changing nature of traditional positions and the impact of integrating new types of library professionals into our organizational cultures, the collection spurs what must become an ongoing discussion of the future of the academic library and its contributions to the strategic concerns of its campus.
“The Expert Library: Staffing, Sustaining, and Advancing the Academic Library in the 21st Century” is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store and  by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.
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The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

ACRL releases Value of Academic Libraries report

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the release of “Value of Academic Libraries: A Comprehensive Research Review and Report.” Developed for ACRL by Megan Oakleaf of the iSchool at Syracuse University, this valuable resource reviews the quantitative and qualitative literature, methodologies and best practices currently in place for demonstrating the value of academic libraries. The full report, along with supplemental materials, is available online at http://www.acrl.ala.org/value/.

Increasing recognition of the value of libraries and librarians by leaders in higher education, information technology, funding agencies and campus decision makers is one of ACRL’s six strategic priorities. Recognizing the sense of urgency around this issue, the report is intended to help academic librarians participate in the conversation and to identify resources to support them in demonstrating the value of academic libraries in clear, measurable ways.

“This report presents the vision and the reality of the value of academic libraries and their contributions to institutional goals and outcomes,” said ACRL President Lisa Hinchliffe of the University of Illinois at Urbana – Champaign. “Through it, we have a shared knowledge base for the association and our members as we pursue this strategic priority.”

The primary objective of this comprehensive review is to provide academic librarians and institutional leaders with a clearer understanding of what research about the performance of academic libraries already exists and where gaps in this research occur. The report additionally identifies the most promising best practices and measures correlated to performance and represents a starting point to assist college, university and community college librarians in gathering evidence to tell the story of their libraries and promote dialogue on the value of the academic library in higher education.

“Documenting the evidence we have for the impact of academic libraries on student, faculty and institutional success will enable library leaders to respond proactively to calls for accountability and return on investment. Identifying the gaps charts a path for the data we need to gather and analyze,” explained Hinchliffe. “In the coming months, ACRL will be turning its attention to strategies for pursuing the research agenda recommended in the report, identifying funding sources for projects and developing training and support materials for our members.”

The full report is now available on the ACRL website, along with a separate executive summary for distribution to campus decision makers, a bibliography of sources consulted in the development of the report, a podcast interview with Hinchliffe and Oakleaf and links to additional resources. Visit http://www.acrl.ala.org/value/ for complete information on this exciting new resource.

Hinchliffe and Oakleaf are available for media interviews and group presentations highlighting the report. Contact ACRL Communications Specialist David Free at dfree@ala.org for more information and to schedule interviews and presentations.

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The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association (ALA) representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

New ACRL publication: The Academic Library Building in the Digital Age

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of “The Academic Library Building in the Digital Age: A Study of Construction, Planning, and Design of New Library Space,” a research study conducted by Illinois Institute of Technology Dean of Libraries Christopher Stewart.

“The Academic Library Building in the Digital Age: A Study of Construction, Planning and Design of New Library Space” is the first comprehensive study of planning and construction of academic library buildings completed entirely in the 21st century. Given digitization of collections, the dynamic mix of new learning spaces with traditional library functions and other factors informing contemporary library design, the Digital Age has not raised so much the question of if libraries will survive, but how they will survive. Stewart’s study answers this question by examining academic library building projects completed in recent years. The book includes survey results on planning processes and such building characteristics as user space in each building, usage and new roles for library buildings.

The Academic Library Building in the Digital Age: A Study of Construction, Planning and Design of New Library Space” is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store (http://www.alastore.ala.org), by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

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The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association, representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

New from ACRL: Advocacy, Outreach and the Nation’s Academic Libraries: A Call for Action

NEWS
For Immediate Release
June 15, 2010

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of the “Advocacy, Outreach and the Nation’s Academic Libraries: A Call for Action,” edited by William Welburn, Janice Welburn and Beth McNeil. In the current fiscal environment, college and university librarians must clearly articulate their value to the teaching, learning and research missions of their institutions. “Advocacy, Outreach and the Nation’s Academic Libraries” provides a framework for opening dialogue and incorporating advocacy by exploring opportunities for advocacy and focusing on the world of civic engagement as well as the role of librarians as advocates on campus.

In 12 insightful chapters, “Advocacy, Outreach and the Nation’s Academic Libraries” highlights the collaborative nature of advocacy and the importance of seeing opportunities for effective advocacy in a variety of areas. The authors focus on scholarly activity and the production of research, outreach and civic engagement, the adoption of new and emerging technologies, information literacy, service to student populations, diversity and organizational development as potential avenues for libraries to assert their value in their communities. “Advocacy, Outreach and the Nation’s Academic Libraries” stresses the importance of all academic librarians embracing advocacy as a core responsibility.

Advocacy, Outreach and the Nation’s Academic Libraries” is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store (http://www.alastore.ala.org), by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

Contact:
Kathryn Deiss
kdeiss@ala.org

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ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

New ACRL publication: Comprehensive Guide to Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Recovery

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of the “Comprehensive Guide to Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Recovery,” an essential toolkit for libraries of all types and sizes. Authors Frances Wilkinson, Linda Lewis and Nancy Dennis provide practical and experience-based approaches on preparing for a disaster by creating a plan, responding to an emergency and the intricacies of recovering from a disaster.

“Comprehensive Guide to Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Recovery” features seven compelling, reality-based case studies from six university libraries that recovered from earthquake, fire, flood or hurricane damage. The clearly organized text contains numerous photographs and a comprehensive appendix featuring an extensive bibliography and glossary, a model disaster preparedness plan and a model RFP for selecting a disaster recovery vendor, as well as useful Internet sites and print resources. The work provides sound explanations and advice on every aspect of disaster preparedness, response and recovery in libraries.

“Comprehensive Guide to Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Recovery” is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store (http://www.alastore.ala.org), by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

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The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association, representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

New ACRL publication: Conversations that Work

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of “Conversations that Work: Conducting Performance Assessments” by Phillipa Brown (SPHR) and M. Sue Baughman. The third entry in the ACRL Active Guide series, “Conversations that Work” is a practical guide for addressing the real-life experiences of conducting performance evaluations in the workplace. Tools and techniques for all stages are provided, including exercises that offer the opportunity to practice and develop your assessment and evaluation skills.

The book additionally includes a variety of scenarios describing different types of evaluation conversations, providing concrete examples from which to learn. The scenarios and exercises are a mix of creative license and reconstruction of portions of actual cases from the authors’ experiences and those shared by colleagues. “Conversations that Work” provides solid advice and examples to demystify and improve the performance evaluation process.

ACRL Active Guides is an occasional series devoted to providing practical guidance on workplace issues. Previous Active Guide titles are “Life-Work Balance” and “Influencing without Authority.”

“Conversations that Work: Conducting Performance Assessments” is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store (http://www.alastore.ala.org), by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

Contact: Kathryn Deiss
ACRL
(312) 280-2529
kdeiss@ala.org

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The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association, representing more than 12,500 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/.