Entries Tagged 'Scholarly Communication' ↓

Scholarly Communication 101 Road Show hosts selected by ACRL

CHICAGO — The Scholarly Communications Committee of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has selected five sites from 40 applications to host the Scholarly Communication 101: Starting with the Basics workshop this spring and summer. Recognizing that scholarly communication issues are central to the work of all academic librarians and all types of institutions, ACRL is underwriting the costs of delivering this proven content by sending expert presenters on the road.

The institutions selected to host the 2010 road shows are Florida State University in Tallahassee; Lehigh Valley Association of Independent Colleges in Bethlehem, Pa.; Bryan College in Dayton, Tenn.; Kansas State University in Manhattan and Texas Tech University in Lubbock

“As the economic downturn continues in higher education and across the nation, ACRL is providing this valuable educational experience at locations all across the country. It is vital to the work of all academic librarians that they understand the basics of the evolving scholarly communication system,” said Richard Fyffe, ACRL Scholarly Communications Committee co-chair and Rosenthal Librarian of the College at Grinnell College. “We want to be sure that the momentum for encouraging positive change in scholarly publishing not be lost.”

Led by two expert presenters, this structured interactive overview of the scholarly communication system supports individual or institutional strategic planning and action.  The workshop focuses on new methods of scholarly publishing and communication, open access and openness as a principle, copyright and intellectual property and economics, providing a foundational understanding for attendees.

Host sites are partnering with other institutions in their area to extend the reach to as diverse an audience as possible. Library staff, including liaison librarians, catalogers, access services and senior management from two-year, liberal arts, master’s, comprehensive and doctoral institutions will attend the workshops.

The 40 applications came from 23 states, Puerto Rico and Canada, representing more than  80 colleges and universities, 16 consortia and their members and nine ACRL Chapters.

“The amount of interest in this program really underscores its importance,” noted Kimberly Douglas, ACRL Scholarly Communications Committee co-chair and university librarian at the California Institute of Technology. “All of the applications were well-crafted and presented great arguments for their sites; this certainly provided for a very competitive selection process. Given the strong demand, a third round of road shows in 2011 is likely. We also encourage libraries to organize and host their own workshops on campus.”

Toward that end, the committee has extended the reach of the Scholarly Communication 101: Starting with the Basics workshop by adding related materials to the popular Scholarly Communication Toolkit (http://www.acrl.ala.org/scholcomm/). The materials include short videos, presentation templates and handouts. All of the materials are available with a Creative Commons share-alike license. Librarians are free to make use of these tools to enhance their own knowledge or adapt them to offer related workshops on campus.

Learn more about ACRL’s scholarly communication initiatives at http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/issues/scholcomm/scholarlycommunication.cfm.

Contact:  Kara Malenfant
ACRL Scholarly Communications and
Government Relations Specialist
(312) 280-2510
kmalenfant@ala.org

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ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, representing more than 12,500 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.

ACRL offers Scholarly Communication 101 road shows

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is taking scholarly communication on the road again in 2010 with “Scholarly Communication 101: Starting with the Basics.” Recognizing that scholarly communication issues are central to the work of all academic librarians and all types of institutions, ACRL is pleased to offer this free half-day workshop to five libraries across the country. Complete details on “Scholarly Communication 101: Starting with the Basics” are available on the ACRL Web site at http://acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/issues/scholarlycomm/roadshow.cfm.

Led by two expert presenters, this structured interactive overview of the scholarly communication system highlights individual or institutional strategic planning and action. Four modules focus on new methods of scholarly publishing and communication, copyright and intellectual property, economics and open access. As a result of the workshop, participants will understand scholarly communication as a system to manage the results of research and scholarly inquiry, enumerate new modes and models of scholarly communication and select and cite key principles, facts and messages relevant to current or nascent scholarly communication plans and programs at their institutions. “Scholarly Communication 101” is appropriate for those with new leadership assignments in scholarly communication as well as liaisons and others who are interested in the issues and need foundational understanding.

Institutions interested in hosting “Scholarly Communication 101” should apply by Monday, Feb. 8, 2010. Hosts must partner with, and invite staff from, at least one other institution. The ACRL Scholarly Communication Committee will review applications and select several locations for the workshop, based on the number of requests and capacity. The committee will aim for geographic diversity and notify applicants of their status by March 1, 2010.

The application form and complete details, including additional qualifications and hosting responsibilities, are available on the ACRL Web site at http://acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/issues/scholarlycomm/roadshow.cfm.

Contact:  Kara J. Malenfant
ACRL Scholarly Communications and Government Relations Specialist
(312) 280-2510
kmalenfant@ala.org

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ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, representing nearly 13,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.

Scholarly Communication 101 materials now online

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is extending the reach of the “Scholarly Communication 101: Starting with the Basics” workshop by adding related materials to its popular Scholarly Communication Toolkit. The materials — including short videos, presentations templates and handouts — were developed for the half-day workshop offered at the ACRL 14th National Conference in Seattle and traveling to five locations around the country this summer (http://www.ala.org/ala/newspresscenter/news/pressreleases2009/april2009/acrlscroadshowhosts.cfm). Now librarians can make use of these tools to enhance their own knowledge or adapt them to offer related workshops on their own campuses. The Scholarly Communication Toolkit is available online at http://www.acrl.ala.org/scholcomm/.

Developing a basic understanding of scholarly communication issues should be a high priority for every librarian. Enhancing understanding of how scholars work along with the systems, tools and technology to support the evolving work of the creation, personal organization, aggregation, discovery, preservation, access and exchange of information in all formats is one of six strategic priorities for 2009-13 developed by the ACRL Board of Directors (http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/about/whatisacrl/index.cfm). The newly developed tools support this strategic priority, with a focus on new methods of scholarly publishing and communication, copyright and intellectual property and economics along with open access and openness as a principle.

The ACRL Scholarly Communication Committee, as part of its efforts to keep the toolkit current, encourages librarians to contribute tools and case studies on their local scholarly communication campaigns. Simply post a comment describing your tool and provide a link in the appropriate tab.

Contact:  Kara J. Malenfant
ACRL Scholarly Communications & Government Relations Specialist
(312) 280-2510
kmalenfant@ala.org

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ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, representing more than 13,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.

ACRL selects Scholarly Communication 101 Road Show hosts

CHICAGO — The Scholarly Communications Committee of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has selected five sites from 46 applications to host the “Scholarly Communication 101: Starting with the Basics” workshop this summer.  Recognizing that scholarly communication issues are central to the work of all academic librarians and all types of institutions, ACRL is underwriting the costs of delivering this proven content by sending expert presenters on the road.

The institutions selected are:

  • ACRL Louisiana Chapter, Baton Rouge, La.
  • Auraria Library, Denver
  • State University of New York at Buffalo Libraries, Buffalo, N.Y.
  • University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico
  • Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis

“At a time of cuts in travel budgets for libraries and librarians, ACRL is providing this valuable educational experience at locations all across the country. It is vital to the work of all academic librarians to understand the basics of the evolving scholarly communication system,” said Richard Fyffe, ACRL Scholarly Communications Committee co-chair and Rosenthal librarian of the college at Grinnell College. “We want to be sure that during this time of constrained budgets, the momentum for encouraging positive change in scholarly publishing not be lost.”

The 46 applications represented nearly 150 colleges, universities, consortia and library networks from more than 30 states, Canada and Puerto Rico. “The amount of interest in this program really underscores its importance,” noted Kimberly Douglas, ACRL Scholarly Communications Committee co-chair and university librarian at the California Institute of Technology. “All of the applications were well-crafted and presented great arguments for their sites; this certainly provided for a very competitive selection process. Given the strong demand, we are considering how best to extend this to a broader community, perhaps through Webcasts and other virtual offerings.”

Led by two expert presenters, this structured interactive overview of the scholarly communication system supports individual or institutional strategic planning and action.  The workshop focuses on new methods of scholarly publishing and communication, open access and openness as a principle, copyright and intellectual property and economics, providing a foundational understanding for attendees.

Host sites are partnering with other institutions in their area to extend the reach to as diverse an audience as possible. Library staff, including liaison librarians, catalogers, access services and senior management from two-year, liberal arts, master’s, comprehensive and doctoral institutions will attend the workshops.

Learn more about ACRL’s scholarly communication initiatives at http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/issues/scholcomm/scholarlycommunication.cfm.

Contact:  Kara Malenfant
ACRL Scholarly Communications and
Government Relations Specialist
(312) 280-2510
kmalenfant@ala.org

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ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, representing more than 13,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.

ACRL offers Scholarly Communication 101 road show

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is taking scholarly communication on the road in 2009 with “Scholarly Communication 101: Starting with the Basics.” Recognizing that scholarly communication issues are central to the work of all academic librarians and all types of institutions, ACRL is pleased to offer this free three-hour workshop to libraries across the country. Complete details on “Scholarly Communication 101: Starting with the Basics” are available on the ACRL Web site at http://acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/issues/scholarlycomm/roadshow.cfm.
.
Led by two expert presenters, this structured interactive overview of the scholarly communication system highlights individual or institutional strategic planning and action. Four modules focus on new methods of scholarly publishing and communication, copyright and intellectual property, economics and open access. As a result of the workshop, participants will understand scholarly communication as a system to manage the results of research and scholarly inquiry, enumerate new modes and models of scholarly communication and select and cite key principles, facts and messages relevant to current or nascent scholarly communication plans and programs at their institutions. “Scholarly Communication 101” is appropriate for those with new leadership assignments in scholarly communication as well as liaisons and others who are interested in the issues and need foundational understanding.

Institutions interested in hosting “Scholarly Communication 101” should apply by Monday, April 13. Hosts must partner with, and invite staff from, at least one other institution. The ACRL Scholarly Communication Committee will review applications and select several locations for the workshop, based on the number of requests and capacity. The committee will aim for geographic diversity and notify applicants of their status by Friday, April 24.

The application form and complete details, including additional qualifications and hosting responsibilities, are available on the ACRL Web site at http://acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/issues/scholarlycomm/roadshow.cfm.

Contact:  Kara J. Malenfant
ACRL Scholarly Communications and Government Relations Specialist
(312) 280-2510
kmalenfant@ala.org

 

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ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, representing more than 13,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.

New look, updated content for ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has released an updated version of its popular Scholarly Communication Toolkit in a new format and with updated content. The toolkit continues to provide context and background by summarizing key issues to offer quick, basic information on scholarly communication topics. It also links to examples of specific tools, including handouts, presentations and videos for libraries to adapt and use on their own campuses. The ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit is freely available at http://www.acrl.ala.org/scholcomm/.

“Library services involve education of the next generation, infrastructure for long term knowledge access and advocacy for rights and practices that lead to a sustainable system of scholarly peer-review, its distribution and preservation,” explains Kim Douglas, university librarian at California Institute of Technology and co-chair of ACRL’s Scholarly Communication Committee. “The ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit supports library staff seeking to align their programs with an essential byproduct of their parent institutions — the creation, protection, dissemination and archiving of new knowledge.”

“Given the current economic climate, it’s natural to ask if scholarly communication activities are a luxury or a distraction,” said Richard Fyffe, librarian of the college for Grinnell College and co-chair of ACRL’s Scholarly Communication Committee. “We define scholarly communications issues as central to the mission of virtually every kind of academic library because they are central to the mission of our institutions. We feel libraries need to maintain a commitment to awareness, understanding, ownership and activism.”

The updated toolkit serves as a resource for scholarly communication discussions inside the library, outreach programs to faculty and administrators and library school students seeking to incorporate these issues into their course work. The ACRL Scholarly Communication Committee, as part of its efforts to keep the toolkit current, encourages librarians to contribute tools and case studies on their local scholarly communication campaigns. Simply post a comment describing your tool and provide a link in the appropriate tab.

The ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit is available online at http://www.acrl.ala.org/scholcomm/.

Contact: Kara J. Malenfant
ACRL Scholarly Communications & Government Relations Specialist
(312) 280-2510
kmalenfant@ala.org

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ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, representing nearly 13,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.

ARL/ACRL announce new regional Institute on Scholarly Communication

CHICAGO — The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announce a new regional ARL/ ACRL Institute on Scholarly Communication, hosted by the Orbis Cascade Alliance, December 1—3, 2008, in Portland, Ore.

This immersive learning experience prepares participants to be local experts within their libraries. Participants, who are encouraged to attend in teams, will become fluent in scholarly communication issues and trends and begin developing outreach plans for their campuses.

Acceptance to the Portland ARL/ACRL Institute on Scholarly Communication is competitive; participation is limited to 100 to ensure an environment that fosters group interaction and active participation. Institutions from the Northwest will receive preferred consideration, and seats are reserved for a minimum 20 participants outside the region. Applications will be accepted until Aug. 15. Find complete details on the Orbis Cascade Alliance Web site at http://www.orbiscascade.org/index/isc/.

Consortia or other institutions that may be interested in hosting the next regional Institute on Scholarly Communication should contact Julia Blixrud, assistant executive director, External Relations, ARL, jblix@arl.org.

Contacts: Karla Hahn
ARL
(202) 296-2296
khahn@arl.org

 

Kara Malenfant
ACRL
(312) 280-2510
kmalenfant@ala.org

 

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The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is a nonprofit organization of 123 research libraries in North America. Its mission is to influence the changing environment of scholarly communication and the public policies that affect research libraries and the diverse communities they serve. ARL pursues this mission by advancing the goals of its member research libraries, providing leadership in public and information policy to the scholarly and higher education communities, fostering the exchange of ideas and expertise, and shaping a future environment that leverages its interests with those of allied organizations. ARL is on the Web at http://www.arl.org/.

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing more than 13,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/.

SPARC-ACRL Forum to focus on student engagement

CHICAGO – The 16th SPARC-ACRL Forum, “Working with the Facebook Generation: Engaging Student Views on Access to Scholarship,” will be held at the ALA Midwinter Meeting in Philadelphia on January 12. Co-sponsored by SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and ACRL (Association of College and Research Libraries), the semiannual forum focuses on emerging issues in scholarly communication.

Appreciating, if not understanding, student perspectives on information sharing and access to research will advance library outreach programs. Librarians and students have the power to build valuable bridges of collaboration and guide the larger academic community to reshape scholarly communication.

Tech-savvy students, who live and breathe information sharing, are critical to changing the way scholarly communication is conducted. Not bound by traditional modes of research exchange, students are using all the technologies at their disposal to engage in scholarly discourse – including blogs, wikis and tagging tools. What will they do next? How do they view the future of scholarly exchange?

At the next SPARC-ACRL Forum, graduate students from an array of disciplines, institutions and engaged perspectives will share their approaches to scholarly communication issues. Joined by librarians whose scholarly communication programs have explicit student-focused components, they will explore the importance of outreach and the potential impact of students as current and future key stakeholders. The forum will also showcase the winners of the first Sparky Award for the best short videos on the value of information sharing.
The SPARC – ACRL Forum will be held:
Saturday, Jan. 12, 2008
4:00 – 6:00PM
Pennsylvania Convention Center, room 204 A/B
The event will be also available via SPARC Podcast at a later date.

Speakers include:

  • Andre Brown, PhD student in Physics and Astronomy at the University of Pennsylvania and co-blogger for Biocurious
  • Kimberly Douglas, University Librarian, California Institute of Technology
  • Nelson Pavlosky, Law student at George Mason University and co-founder of Students for Freeculture
  • Stephanie Wang, graduate student in Economics at Princeton University and former National Coordinating Committee member, Universities Allied for Essential Medicines

The forum is followed by the ACRL Scholarly Communication Discussion Group, where there will be an open discussion of key issues that surface at the forum. The Discussion Group will be held Sunday, Jan. 13, from 4:00 – 6:00PM at the Marriott Philadelphia, room Franklin 11. For more information, visit the SPARC Web site at http://www.arl.org/sparc/forum.

SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition), with SPARC Europe and SPARC Japan, is an international alliance of more than 800 academic and research libraries working to create a more open system of scholarly communication. SPARC’s advocacy, educational and publisher partnership programs encourage expanded dissemination of research. SPARC is on the Web at http://www.arl.org/sparc/.

ACRL is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing more than 13,500 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.

ACRL invites comment on scholarly communication research agenda

CHICAGO – A new report by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) explores the gaps in our understanding of the ways that scholars create and share new knowledge. The report lays out a preliminary research agenda for creating greater understanding of the rapidly evolving system of scholarly communication – the way research results and new knowledge are registered, evaluated for quality, disseminated and preserved. Meaningful research about the system of scholarly communication will inform strategic planning for scholarly communication programs.

The white paper, “Establishing a Research Agenda for Scholarly Communication: A Call for Community Engagement,” encourages academics, librarians and their key partners to gather more data on practices that both enable and inhibit the production of scholarship and its communication. The report identifies eight themes, with research possibilities in each area.

The paper resulted from a one-day invitational meeting in July 2007 to collectively brainstorm the evidence needed to manage and influence the changing environment. Attendees included representatives from ACRL, the Association of Research Libraries, the Council on Library and Information Resources, the Coalition for Networked Information, Ithaka, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition). ACRL scholarly communication committee co-chairs John Ober of the University of California and Joyce Ogburn of the University of Utah convened the meeting and discuss the report at http://blogs.ala.org/acrlpodcast.php.

The document is available online for public comment at http://www.acrl.ala.org/scresearchagenda. Please submit comments that:

  • Refine or expand the need for research, important issues and possible projects.

  • Identify additional articles and reports that collectively form a knowledge base from which the research agenda emerges more clearly.

  • Suggest ways to conduct the research.

  • Volunteer to participate or collaborate in a specific research initiative.

  • Propose additional avenues of distribution for the report.

Confidential comments may be emailed to John Ober at John.Ober@ucop.edu or Joyce Ogburn at Joyce.Ogburn@utah.edu.

ACRL is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing more than 13,500 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.

SPARC and ACRL release materials on the progress of open-access journal publishing

CHICAGO    -  The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) and the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), have released interviews and analysis exploring in depth the views of three major open-access publishers on the challenges of sustainability. The materials were produced in conjunction with the 15th SPARC-ACRL Forum on Emerging Issues in Scholarly Communication, which took place on June 23.

The Forum, which is held at every meeting of the American Library Association, offered participants the opportunity to engage in conversation with top executives from the three organizations. Speakers included Mark Patterson, director of publishing for the Public Library of Science; Bryan Vickery, deputy publisher for BioMed Central and Editorial Director for Chemistry Central; and Paul Peters, director of business development for Hindawi Publishing Corporation. Alma Swan, of Key Perspectives Ltd., moderated the session. Podcasts and slides from the event are now available at http://www.arl.org/sparc/meetings/ala07.

The new materials offer a deeper level of insight into the three publishers’ business models and include:

  • Interviews (in podcast and written formats) with each executive exploring each organization’s approach in detail.

  • A matrix comparison of the publishers’ views on 11 aspects of maintaining their operations, including: the financial viability of the company; the basis for charging publication fees; new and traditional impact factors; and the role of institutional memberships in the business model.

These tools for campus outreach were produced for SPARC and ACRL by Alma Swan of Key Perspectives Ltd. and may be downloaded through http://www.arl.org/sparc/meetings/ala07 .


For more information, visit the SPARC Web site at http://www.arl.org/sparc/forum or the ACRL Web site at
   http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlissues/scholarlycomm/scholarlycommunication.cfm.

 

SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition), with SPARC Europe and SPARC Japan, is an international alliance of more than 800 academic and research libraries working to create a more open system of scholarly communication. SPARC’s advocacy, educational and publisher partnership programs encourage expanded dissemination of research. SPARC is on the Web at http://www.arl.org/sparc/ .

 

ACRL is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing more than 13,500 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments.