ACRL announces new Immersion Program faculty

CHICAGO – The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the appointment of four new members of the association’s Information Literacy Immersion Program faculty. The new faculty members are:

Char Booth – E-Learning Librarian at the University of California – Berkeley. Booth focuses on the Immersion curricular areas of information literacy, teaching/pedagogy, assessment and learning theory. She received her MLIS in 2005 from the University of Texas at Austin, her MA in Education in Computer Education and Technology in 2008 from Ohio University and is a 2007 alumna of the Teacher Track.

Wendy Holliday – Coordinator of Library Instruction at Utah State University. Holliday’s focus is in the areas of information literacy, learning theory and teaching/pedagogy. She received her MLIS in 2002 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and holds a Ph.D. in History from New York University.

Michelle Millet – Head of Research Services at the University of Texas at San Antonio. Millet will focus on the areas of leadership and assessment. She received her MLIS in 2001 from the University of South Florida and her master’s in History in 2000 from Florida Atlantic University.

Karen Nicholson – Teaching and Learning Librarian at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Nicholson will contribute to the program in the areas of  information literacy and teaching/pedagogy. She received her MLIS in 2001 from McGill University, where she also received an MA in Contemporary French Literature.

“The committee was very impressed by the depth of experience represented among the applicants,” said Julie Planchon Wolf, chair of the selection committee. “These new appointments will enable the Immersion faculty to explore new program areas and delivery methods to complement and extend the impact of a program that has proven its worth many times over.”

Now in its 12th year, the Immersion Program brings together academic librarians for four to five days of intensive work in teaching and information literacy. With nearly 1,600 graduates of previous national and regional sessions, the program has transformed individuals, students and instruction programs nationally and internationally. There are generally four Immersion Program tracks held each year. The Teacher and Program Track Immersion Programs are normally offered in July or early August, with the Assessment and Intentional Teaching Track Immersion Programs usually offered in November or early December.

Visit http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/issues/infolit/professactivity/ii… for more information on the program.

**

ACRL is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environment. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

ACRL receives Delmas Foundation grant for RBML online archive

CHICAGO – The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has received a grant from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation to provide digitized archives of Rare Books & Manuscripts Librarianship (RBML). The grant provides $3,000 in funding to assist in making volumes 1-12 of RBML, the predecessor of RBM: A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage, discoverable and available online through the HighWire Press platform, completing the publication’s online archive.

“I am thrilled that ACRL received this generous grant,” said RBM editor Beth Whittaker, head of the Spencer Research Library at the University of Kansas. “The RBM editorial board, along with ALA and ACRL, is indebted to the Delmas Foundation for choosing to fund this important project. We look forward to contributing the full archive of RBML to the online library literature.”

The 24 back issues will join volumes 13 and 14 of RBML and the full run of RBM online. Whittaker and the staff of the University of Kansas Libraries completed the scanning of the RBML back content over the past year.

RBML and RBM are the two journals in which librarians and library school students can find many of the most important articles that have been written about rare books and special collections librarianship since 1986,” said Henry Raine, chair of ACRL’s Rare Books & Manuscripts Section (RBMS) and head of library technical services at the New York Historical Society. “Having the entire run of these publications freely available online will greatly facilitate additional scholarship in our field, and will be an invaluable resource for RBMS members and all others interested in rare books, manuscripts and special collections.”

“ACRL is very appreciative of the work of the RBM editorial board and the Rare Books & Manuscripts Section members in advancing this project,” said ACRL Executive Director Mary Ellen Davis. “ACRL is able to accomplish such a diverse range of projects thanks to the many talented members who so generously volunteer their time.”

Access to all content, with the exception of the two most current issues, will be freely available to all. Online access to the current two issues is available only to RBM subscribers. The full run of RBML is expected to be available in early 2011. The journals are available online at http://rbm.acrl.org.

###

ACRL is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation is concerned generally with encouraging excellence in scholarship and the arts, and is particularly interested in wide access to research library collections, the quality of dance performance, and the study and performance of early music. The foundation reflects Gladys Krieble and Jean Paul Delmas’ devotion to New York City and Venice as well as recognizing and supporting the major interests of the donors’ lives: the humanities, research libraries and the performing arts in New York City. The foundation is online at http://www.delmas.org/.

New ACRL publication: Best Practices for Credit-Bearing Information Literacy Courses

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of “Best Practices for Credit-Bearing Information Literacy Courses.” Edited by Christopher Hollister, the work is a collection of previously unpublished papers in which contributing authors describe and recommend best practices for creating, developing and teaching credit-bearing information literacy (IL) courses at the college and university level.

Contributors include academic librarians from universities, four-year colleges and community colleges, who demonstrate successful IL course endeavors at their respective institutions. “Best Practices for Credit-Bearing Information Literacy Courses” includes several case studies of both classroom and online IL courses. Some are elective and some required, some are discipline-specific and others are integrated into academic programs or departments. Contributors discuss useful and effective methods for developing, teaching, assessing and marketing courses. Also included are chapters on theoretical approaches to credit-bearing IL courses and their history in higher education. Organized around three themes–create, develop and teach–this book provides practitioners and administrators with a start-to-finish guide to best practices for credit-bearing IL courses.

“Best Practices for Credit-Bearing Information Literacy Courses” is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

***

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

ACRL e-Learning call for proposals

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is now accepting proposal submissions for the ACRL e-Learning program. Submissions are being accepted for live webcasts and asynchronous online courses. Proposals must be submitted via the online submission form by Dec. 17, 2010. The full call for proposals, including a link to the submission form, is online at
http://www.acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/elearning/elearningpropos… .

ACRL e-Learning webcasts run 90 minutes in length, including time for audience Q and A. Webcasts are offered live on the Elluminate online meeting platform. Presenters can use PowerPoint, online polls, white board and other interactive tools during their sessions. Participants can interact with the presenters via text-based or audio chat. ACRL offers e-Learning webcast presenters a 10-percent royalty of webcast registration fees, less the Elluminate vendor fees, split among the presenters.

Online courses are primarily asynchronous events offered through the Moodle platform over the course of three or four weeks. Courses should include weekly readings, discussion questions, assignments and/or chat sessions. ACRL provides $1,000 for content development for new multi-week courses, as well as a royalty of 10 percent of the course registration fees, split among the presenters, each time the course is offered.

Direct questions about the call for proposals to Margot Conahan at mconahan@ala.org or (312) 280-2522.

***

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

2009 Academic Library Trends and Statistics now available from ACRL

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of “2009 Academic Library Trends and Statistics,” the latest in a series of annual publications that describe the collections, staffing, expenditures and service activities of academic libraries in all Carnegie classifications. The three-volume set includes associate of arts institutions, master’s colleges and universities/baccalaureate colleges and research/doctoral-granting institutions. The individual volumes for associates colleges, masters/baccalaureate and doctoral-granting institutions are also available for purchase.

The 2009 survey includes data from 1,533 academic libraries in six major categories:

– Collections (including volumes, serials, multimedia)
– Expenditures (library materials, wages and salaries, other operating)
– Electronic Resources (including expenditures, collections, services, usage)
– Personnel and Public Services (staff and services)
– Ph.D.s Granted, Faculty, Student Enrollment
– Faculty Rank, Status, and Tenure for Librarians

The survey also provides analysis of selected variables and summary data (high, low, mean and median) for all elements. The 2009 data can be used for self-studies, budgeting, strategic planning, annual reports, grant applications and benchmarking.

“2009 Academic Library Trends and Statistics” is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers. Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org or (312) 280-2523 with questions.

***

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association, representing nearly 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

New ACRL publication: Web Research in Academic Libraries

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of “Web Research in Academic Libraries” (CLIP Note #41). This exciting new title provides useful information on teaching Web research strategies in information literacy instruction.

In the increasingly complex electronic information environment, undergraduates gravitate to the Web for their information needs. Complied by Rebecca Sullivan of Luther College, “Web Research in Academic Libraries” examines to what extent and in what ways academic libraries have incorporated Web search strategies into their information literacy instruction programs. The book compiles descriptions and sample documents of current practices from college libraries of all sizes, including information on Web evaluation and assessment. The title is suitable for community college, college and university libraries as well as a pedagogical tool for library and information schools.

Web Research in Academic Libraries” (CLIP Note #41) is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

##

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association (ALA) representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

New from ACRL – The Expert Library: Staffing, Sustaining, and Advancing the Academic Library in the 21st Century

CHICAGOThe Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the publication of “The Expert Library: Staffing, Sustaining, and Advancing the Academic Library in the 21st Century,” edited by Scott Walter and Karen Williams.

In the midst of a decade of extraordinary change in academic libraries — change driven by information technology, new approaches to teaching and learning, new models for scholarly communication and new expectations for the ways we will discover, share and use information — there is nothing as important to the future of the library and its continued place at the heart of the academic enterprise than its people and the expertise that they bring to the design, development and delivery of library services.

What will those services be and who will provide them? “The Expert Library” provides an overview of the changing dynamics of recruiting and retaining academic library professionals for the 21st century. The thought-provoking book provides fresh thinking and insights into what will be required to ensure continued library relevance and success through its people.
“Academic libraries are about a shifting array of professional, technical and support personnel who bring critical expertise and experience to both the sustained responsibilities and the new roles that higher education libraries are advancing,” writes James G. Neal, vice president for information services and university librarian at Columbia University, in the foreword. “This volume, for the first time, brings together fresh thinking and insights about what will be required to advance library relevance and success through people.”
In 13 engaging essays, “The Expert Library” draws on the experience of academic librarians looking back over a decade of research and innovation, during which the profession has struggled to identify both its core competencies and the areas of professional expertise needed to support programs in scholarly communications, assessment, information literacy instruction, data curation, strategic communication and assessment.
Providing a lens for viewing discussions of the academic library job market, the changing nature of traditional positions and the impact of integrating new types of library professionals into our organizational cultures, the collection spurs what must become an ongoing discussion of the future of the academic library and its contributions to the strategic concerns of its campus.
“The Expert Library: Staffing, Sustaining, and Advancing the Academic Library in the 21st Century” is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store and  by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.
***
The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association (ALA), representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

2010 Women’s Leadership Institute registration opens

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is joining with 18 other higher education associations to offer the 2010 Women’s Leadership Institute, to be held Dec. 5-8, 2010, in Amelia Island, Fla. The early-bird registration deadline for the institute is Oct. 31, 2010. Complete program details, cosponsors and a link to registration materials are available at http://www.acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/womensleadership.cfm.

The institute brings together mid-level administrators from across campus functions to share experiences and develop a better understanding of the campus as a whole. Attendees will have the opportunity to hone their leadership skills for working in a rapidly changing environment, develop a better understanding of the campus as a workplace and culture, share experiences with others about how campuses are adapting and adjusting to the new economic reality, create new personal networks and networking skills to better tap the higher education community and examine the unique roles, skills and relationships needed to lead as higher education faces and deals with the most challenging period in recent memory.

Held on beautiful Amelia Island off the coast of Jacksonville, Fla., the institute brings together women leaders from across higher education in a collaborative learning setting. Past participants report being gratified by the synergy of the conversations, the lessons learned and the renewed enthusiasm they feel for establishing greater collaboration with other units on their own campuses.

The Women’s Leadership Institute, now in its fourth year, is co-produced by AASHE, ACCED-I, ACPA, ACRL, ACUA, ACUHO-I, ACUI, AFA, APPA, ASCA, CSHEMA, NACA, NACAS, NACUBO, NACUFS , NAEP, NASPA, NIRSA and NODA.

Direct questions on the Women’s Leadership Institute to Kathryn Deiss at kdeiss@ala.org or call (312) 280-2529.

##

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association (ALA) representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

ACRL releases Value of Academic Libraries report

CHICAGO — The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) announces the release of “Value of Academic Libraries: A Comprehensive Research Review and Report.” Developed for ACRL by Megan Oakleaf of the iSchool at Syracuse University, this valuable resource reviews the quantitative and qualitative literature, methodologies and best practices currently in place for demonstrating the value of academic libraries. The full report, along with supplemental materials, is available online at http://www.acrl.ala.org/value/.

Increasing recognition of the value of libraries and librarians by leaders in higher education, information technology, funding agencies and campus decision makers is one of ACRL’s six strategic priorities. Recognizing the sense of urgency around this issue, the report is intended to help academic librarians participate in the conversation and to identify resources to support them in demonstrating the value of academic libraries in clear, measurable ways.

“This report presents the vision and the reality of the value of academic libraries and their contributions to institutional goals and outcomes,” said ACRL President Lisa Hinchliffe of the University of Illinois at Urbana – Champaign. “Through it, we have a shared knowledge base for the association and our members as we pursue this strategic priority.”

The primary objective of this comprehensive review is to provide academic librarians and institutional leaders with a clearer understanding of what research about the performance of academic libraries already exists and where gaps in this research occur. The report additionally identifies the most promising best practices and measures correlated to performance and represents a starting point to assist college, university and community college librarians in gathering evidence to tell the story of their libraries and promote dialogue on the value of the academic library in higher education.

“Documenting the evidence we have for the impact of academic libraries on student, faculty and institutional success will enable library leaders to respond proactively to calls for accountability and return on investment. Identifying the gaps charts a path for the data we need to gather and analyze,” explained Hinchliffe. “In the coming months, ACRL will be turning its attention to strategies for pursuing the research agenda recommended in the report, identifying funding sources for projects and developing training and support materials for our members.”

The full report is now available on the ACRL website, along with a separate executive summary for distribution to campus decision makers, a bibliography of sources consulted in the development of the report, a podcast interview with Hinchliffe and Oakleaf and links to additional resources. Visit http://www.acrl.ala.org/value/ for complete information on this exciting new resource.

Hinchliffe and Oakleaf are available for media interviews and group presentations highlighting the report. Contact ACRL Communications Specialist David Free at dfree@ala.org for more information and to schedule interviews and presentations.

##

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association (ALA) representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

Fall e-Learning from ACRL

CHICAGO – The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is offering a wide variety of online learning opportunities in fall 2010 to meet the demands of your schedule and budget. Full details and registration information are available on the ACRL website at http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/proftools/elearning.cfm.

Registration for all online seminars and webcasts qualifies for the ACRL Frequent Learner Program. Register for three ACRL e-Learning events and receive one free registration. Visit http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/elearning/freqlearner.cfm for more information on the Frequent Learner Program.

ACRL online seminars are asynchronous, multiweek courses delivered through Moodle. Online seminars scheduled for fall 2010 include:

Copyright and the Library Part 1: The Basics Including Fair Use (Sept. 13 – Oct. 1, 2010): Build an understanding of current copyright law, creating a “copyright palette” for your library and assessing a library’s legal risk with regard to current U.S. copyright law. Gain an understanding of the Fair Use clause, as well as how to legally apply fair use in the library, classroom and broader campus environments.

Designing Usable and Accessible Web Pages: Needs, Analysis, Design Planning, XHTML and CSS Standards, Accessibility Validation, and Usability Testing (Beginners) (Sept. 13 – Oct. 8, 2010): This hands-on course focuses on the basics of website planning, design and content development. The course will also examine Web standards, usability and accessibility. XHTML and CSS (external) will be introduced.

Creating Usable and Accessible Web Pages: XHTML and CSS Review, Navigation, Interactivity, CMS and Other Options (Intermediate) (Oct. 4 – Nov. 12, 2010): Participants in this online course will be able to use CSS layout to design highly accessible navigation and menus; create basic forms; use free JavaScripts to add functionality; design with multimedia; and understand strengths and limitations of CMS.

Successful Budgeting in Academic Libraries (Oct. 11-30, 2010): In this course, participants will learn essential budgeting skills, including how to develop and manage a budget and how to write a persuasive budget request.

Learning Objects: Creating Instruction To Go (Nov. 1-21, 2010): Find out more about learning objects and learn how to create a learning object using a Web 2.0 application or other suitable technology in this course.

ACRL also offers a variety of timely live webcasts addressing hot topics in academic librarianship. Webcasts last from an hour and a half to two hours and take place in an interactive online classroom. Group discounts are available for all ACRL e-Learning webcasts. Fall 2010 webcasts include:

The Not-So-Distant Librarian: Online Library Instruction to Engage Students and Faculty (Sept. 14, 2010): Learn practical tips and tools for designing, implementing and assessing online library instruction in this ACRL webcast.

From Idea to Publication Series: Understanding the Research Question (Sept. 23, 2010): Learn to formulate and define good research questions, select appropriate research methodologies and design the research study. Specific topics will include the development of useful questionnaires, techniques used in conducting telephone interviews, working with focus groups and constructing surveys to get the information they need.

So You Want to Create an Interactive Information Literacy Tutorial? (Oct. 19, 2010): Learn about the experience creating an interactive information literacy tutorial from beginning to end in collaboration with a multimedia designer in this webcast. Evaluate the potential of tutorial as an assessment tool and an opportunity for self-evaluation.

From Idea to Publication Series: Analysis and Writing (Nov. 4, 2010): Learn to apply the appropriate analysis methods to your project’s data or information, depending on the research methodology you are using. It is essential to have an understanding of the appropriate forms of analyses (along with their possibilities and limitations). Then comes writing. Readers must be able to comprehend your original question or problem, the process of selecting the appropriate methodology, your processes of analysis and the meaning of your findings.

Building a New Librarianship (Nov. 9, 2010): The future for librarians is bright, but not if we continue on our current path. We must bravely envision a new librarianship, one based on knowledge, activism and embedding ourselves deeply into the academy’s daily work. This session seeks to lay out a foundation for this new librarianship, with real world examples.

New Models for Credit-Bearing Information Literacy Courses (Nov. 16, 2010): Learn about best practices for credit-bearing information literacy courses in this ACRL webcast, based upon a literature review and several years of experimentation with various approaches to teaching a one-credit course.

From Idea to Publication Series: Submitting for Publication (Dec. 1, 2010): Learn how to select an appropriate journal or publisher, learn how to prepare a manuscript for submission and understand what the submission process will encompass. Also learn how to query editors and how to manage your own author rights, including open access licensing.

Online Forms: Interaction and Feedback without the “Paperwork” (Dec. 7, 2010): With courses and departments moving materials onto the Web or cloud computing platforms, review the possibilities available with interactive forms for the classroom and the department.

Complete details and registration information for all fall 2010 e-Learning opportunities are available online at http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/proftools/elearning.cfm. Contact Kathryn Deiss at kdeiss@ala.org or (312) 280-2529 for more information.

##

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is a division of the American Library Association (ALA) representing more than 12,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning and research environments. ACRL is on the Web at http://www.acrl.org/, Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.