Submit Projects for the NMC Horizon Report > 2017 Library Edition

The expert panel has completed voting and the topics for the NMC Horizon Report > 2017 Library Edition have been selected — below. The report is a collaboration between the NMC, the University of Applied Sciences (HTW) Chur, Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) Hannover, and ETH-Bibliothek Zurich, with ACRL as the distribution partner. It is set to be released on March 23, 2017, at the ACRL 2017 Conference. We’re now looking for any projects, programs, policies, or leadership initiatives that fit any of the chosen areas. View definitions and discussions of all of the final topics on the 2017 Horizon.Library Project wiki.

Submit examples through the brief web form with a title, a URL, and a one- or two-sentence description. The process takes about two minutes and the deadline is Monday, February 13. Complete details are available on the NMC website.

Network Neutrality in the Cross Hairs

Jointly authored by Larra Clark, Krista Cox and Kara Malenfant.

It is widely reported that network neutrality is one of the most endangered telecommunications policy gains of the past two years. The ALA, ARL and ACRL—with EDUCAUSE and other library and higher education allies—have been on the front lines of this battle with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Congress, and the courts for more than a decade. Here’s an update on where we stand, what might come next, and what the library community may do to mobilize.

What’s at stake: Net neutrality is the principle that internet service providers (ISPs) should enable access to all content and applications regardless of the source, and without favoring or blocking particular services or websites. Net neutrality is essential for library and educational institutions to carry out our missions and to ensure protection of freedom of speech, educational achievement, research and economic growth. The Internet has become the pre-eminent platform for learning, collaboration, and interaction among students, faculty, library patrons, local communities, and the world.

In February 2015, the FCC adopted Open Internet rules that provided the strongest network neutrality protections we’ve seen, and which are aligned with library and higher education principles for network neutrality and ongoing direct advocacy with FCC and other allies. The rules:

  • Prohibit blocking or degrading access to legal content, applications, services, and non-harmful devices; as well as banning paid prioritization, or favoring some content over other traffic;
  • Apply network neutrality protections to both fixed and mobile broadband, which the library and higher education coalition advocated for in our most recent filings, as well as (unsuccessfully) in response to the 2010 Open Internet Order
  • Allow for reasonable network management while enhancing transparency rules regarding how ISPs are doing this;
  • Create a general Open Internet standard for future ISP conduct; and
  • Re-classify ISPs as Title II “common carriers.”

As anticipated, the decision was quickly challenged in court and in Congress. A broad coalition of network neutrality advocates successfully stymied Congressional efforts to undermine the FCC’s Open Internet Order, and library organizations filed as amici at the U.S. Appeals Court for the D.C. Circuit. In June 2016, the three-judge panel affirmed the FCC’s rules.

What’s the threat: During the presidential campaign, and with more specificity since the election, President-elect Donald Trump and members of his transition team, as well as some Republican members of Congress and the FCC, have made rolling back network neutrality protections a priority for action.

Here’s a sample of what we are reading and hearing these days:

As in the past, attacks on network neutrality may take many different forms, including new legislation, judicial appeal to the Supreme Court, initiating a new rulemaking and/or lack of enforcement by new FCC leadership, or new efforts by ISPs to skirt the rules.

For instance, there may be an effort by some Members of Congress to craft a “compromise” bill that would prohibit blocking and degradation by statute but reverse the FCC’s decision to classify ISPs as Title II common carriers.  We are wary, however, that this so-called compromise may not give the FCC the authority to enforce the statutory rules.

So, now what? As the precise shape of the attacks is still taking form, the library and higher education communities are beginning to connect and engage in planning discussions. We will monitor developments and work with others to mobilize action to ensure Open Internet protections are preserved.

Library advocates can help in several ways:

  • Stay informed via District Dispatch blog (subscribe here) and ARL Policy Notes blog (subscribe here).
  • Sign up for Action Alerts so we can reach you quickly when direct action is needed.
  • Share your stories, blog and engage on social networks about the importance of network neutrality and the need to defend it.

Larra Clark is Deputy Director for the ALA Office for Information Technology Policy and Public Library Association. Krista Cox is ARL Director of Public Policy Initiatives. Kara Malenfant is ACRL Senior Strategist for Special Initiatives.

Submit ACRL 2017 Lightning Talk Proposals by Jan. 30

ACRL 2017 logoFire up colleagues in five-minute “Lightning” Sessions. Inspire others with quick glimpses at your latest innovations, interesting ideas, and new technologies and services. The sky is the limit! Each five-minute Lightning Talk will require you to create a maximum of 20 slides that advance automatically every 15 seconds. Submit your proposal before January 30, it’s quick and easy!  The top 30 proposals will be chosen by the innovations committee. Winners will be determined by popular vote in the conference app this February.

Member of the Week: Mohamed Berray

Mohamed BerrayMohamed Berray is Social Sciences Librarian at Florida State University in Tallahassee, FL. Mohamed has been an ACRL member since 2014 and is your ACRL member of the week for January 9, 2017.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Honest, dedicated, generous.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I am currently reading ACRL’s Putting Assessment into Action: Selected Projects from the First Cohort of the Assessment in Action Grant, edited by Eric Ackermann. I am passionate about library assessment, and I’ve learned a lot reading about the experiences of other institutions. For my casual reading, I read The New Yorker magazine.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Inspiring, engaging, empowering.

4. What do you value about ACRL? ACRL provides a greater platform for advocacy of issues relevant to librarianship. The association also provides networking and professional development opportunities for its members. I’ve especially enjoyed serving on ACRL committees and the opportunity to contribute to the growth of our profession.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? As Social Sciences Librarian, I serve as liaison to the political science department, the Askew School of Public Administration and Policy, and the international affairs program. I also coordinate Florida State University Libraries’ depository collection and services for federal, State of Florida, and United Nations documents. In my current position, I have been privileged to provide instruction and research support to faculty and students in the College of Social Sciences, and for the Tallahassee community interested in using government information resources.

6. In your own words: My librarianship values are deep rooted in an analytic, research-driven approach to support the continuous improvement of services to the communities we serve. I have a strong commitment to diversity, and I believe that the differing backgrounds and perspectives that characterize diversity have provided our profession with a competitive advantage in our approach to public service and problem solving. I fully support open access to information as a professional practice. Free and equitable access to information has been a core principle of librarianship since the beginning. Open Access embodies this principle more completely now than ever before.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

C&RL News – January 2017

C&RL News cover January 2017The January 2017 issue of C&RL News is now freely available online. The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education continues to be a major topic of discussion in the academic library community. In this issue’s Perspectives on the Framework column, Troy Swanson of the Moraine Valley Community College discusses his efforts in “Sharing the ACRL Framework with faculty.” Also, visit this month’s News from the Field department for information on the launch of the exciting new ACRL Framework Sandbox.

Experimenting with social media and related technologies for marketing and instruction continue to be a focus for many libraries. In this month’s ACRL TechConnect feature, Elizabeth Price and Rebecca Richardson of Murray State University write about their library’s experiences with Yik Yak in their article “Eavesdropping on the user experience.”

Emily Ford of Portland State University shares her experiences and evolving thinking on digital badging in instruction in her The Way I See It essay “To badge or not to badge?”

With the ACRL 2017 early-bird registration deadline fast approaching, the Baltimore conference is also a trending topic. Sara Arnold-Garza and Joanna Gadsby provide a fascinating history of “Social justice and Baltimore” in our look at the conference’s host city.

Strategic planning is another important, but sometimes dreaded, process for most academic libraries. Aaron L. Brenner, Robin Kear, and Eve Wilder provide a look at ways the University of Pittsburgh Libraries went about “Reinvigorating strategic planning” by introducing more collaborative processes.

The Johns Hopkins Libraries open access promotion fund” is the focus of this month’s Scholarly Communication column by Robin N. Sinn, Sue M. Woodson, and Mark Cyzyk.

Make sure to check out the rest of our features and departments, including Internet Resources on “United Nations” statistical and data resources by Lisa DeLuca of Seton Hall University, and a look at the contents of the January issue of College & Research Libraries, with a focus on library activism, in the C&RL Spotlight department.

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