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Preserving and Curating ETD Research Data and Complex Digital Objects, Guidance Briefs Available for Public Review and Use

Editor’s Note: This guest post comes courtesy of Educopia and the ETDplus Project.

The ETDplus Project invites Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETD) program staff, librarians, faculty advisors, and graduate students to participate in a public review of the Guidance Briefs for Preserving & Curating ETD Research Data & Complex Digital Objects.

About the ETD Guidance Briefs

The Guidance Briefs are short (3-4 page) “how-to” oriented briefs designed to help ETD programs build and nurture supportive relationships with student researchers. These briefs will assist student researchers in understanding how their approaches to data and content management impact credibility, replicable research, and general long-term accessibility: knowledge and skills that will impact the health of their careers for years to come.

Review (and Use!) the Guidance Briefs

Interested ETD stakeholders can download copies of the Guidance Briefs at the following website, https://educopia.org/deliverables/etdplus-guidance-briefs. The Guidance Briefs cover the following topics:

  1. Copyright
  2. Data Structures
  3. File Formats
  4. Metadata
  5. Storage
  6. Version Control

We are releasing these Briefs–both during this initial public review phase and after they are refined–as openly editable documents. We want institutions to use and reuse these in whatever way works for their local audiences. Each Brief includes generally applicable information about its topic, and also includes a “Local Practices” section that an institution may use to call attention to what’s happening on its own campus.

We invite you to help us refine these documents by drawing our project team’s attention to any components that need to be edited, revised, broadened, or narrowed. Please send us an email with your suggestions and/or track your changes within the documents and email those back to us at the addresses below by or before June 30, 2016. We plan to integrate the community’s feedback before formally issuing these Briefs under a CC BY 4.0 license later this summer.

If you have any further questions about the Guidance Briefs or about the ETDplus project, don’t hesitate to reach out to us:

Katherine Skinner, Principal Investigator (katherine@educopia.org)

Sam Meister, Co-Principal Investigator (sam@educopia.org)

Courtney Vukasinovic, Administrative Coordinator (courtney@educopia.org)

About the ETDplus Project

The ETDplus project is helping institutions ensure the longevity and availability of ETD research data and complex digital objects (e.g., software, multimedia files) that comprise an integral component of student theses and dissertations. The project is generously funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and led by the Educopia Institute, in collaboration with the NDLTD, HBCU Alliance, bepress, ProQuest, and the libraries of Carnegie Mellon, Indiana State, Morehouse, Oregon State, Penn State, Purdue, University of Louisville, University of Tennessee, the University of North Texas, and Virginia Tech.

Assessment in Action Comprehensive Bibliography Now Available

Assessment in Action LogoAs the higher education association for librarians, ACRL supports academic and research librarians as change leaders in their campus communities through programs like Assessment in Action: Academic Libraries and Student Success (AiA). The more than 200 participating AiA teams are contributing to innovation in higher education assessment by creating approaches, strategies, and practices that document the contribution of academic libraries to the overall goals and missions of their institutions.

Through AiA, librarian-led teams carried out assessment projects over 14 months at their community colleges, colleges and universities. The projects examined the impact of the library (instruction, reference, collections, space, and more) on student learning/success. Learn more in the new Assessment in Action Bibliography, listing dozens of journal articles, conference presentations and other public reports. This bibliography aims to be comprehensive, capturing all scholarly and practice-based literature and presentations about AiA and campus projects conducted as part of the AiA program by campus team members, facilitators, and ACRL staff.

Stay tuned for more on AiA results in the weeks ahead through:

  • AiA Project Synthesis: A report synthesizing the second year AiA projects and leadership of campus assessment teams will be coming out in early 2016. For the first year synthesis, see full report and executive summary to share broadly with campus stakeholders. Find first and second year poster abstracts, images and full project descriptions in a searchable online collection.
  • Putting Assessment into Action: Selected Projects from the First Cohort of the Assessment in Action Grant: This forthcoming ACRL case book, edited by Eric Ackerman, will showcase 27 short reflections by first year AiA team leaders on the inquiry methods they used in their assessment projects. Assembled into three groupings – Assessing Information Literacy and Library Instruction; Assessing Outreach, Services, and Spaces; and Longitudinal Assessment – the cases describe assessment methods used and the successes and/or failures of these methods along with lessons learned.
  • College and Research Libraries: The March 2016 special issue of ACRL’s scholarly journal will proudly features a selection of 7 action research studies by AiA teams, along with an introductory essay. The aim of the special issue is to help C&RL readers learn more about action research as an approach to scholarship and showcase examples of fruitful action research studies undertaken by AiA teams.

Making the Case for an Academic Friends of the Library Group

United for Libraries has added a new fact sheet to their collection of resources for getting started with academic friends groups. “Making the Case for an Academic Friends of the Library Group” (PDF) is now freely available from the United for Libraries website. Make sure to check out the full group of resources available on the Academic Friends page as well.

United for Libraries, a division of ALA, is a national network of enthusiastic library supporters who believe in the importance of libraries as the social and intellectual centers of communities and campuses. No one has a stronger voice for libraries than those who use them, raise money for them, and govern them. By uniting these voices, library supporters everywhere will become a real force to be reckoned with at the local, state, and national levels.

C&RL News – March 2015

march 15 cover imageThere has been much discussion over the past several months about the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. The Board of Directors decided to “file” the new Framework at the 2015 ALA Midwinter Meeting. More information, along with other Midwinter Board actions, is available in this issue.

At the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, librarians are collaborating on a new flex education program to provide information literacy instruction. Kristin M. Woodward discusses the program in her article “Information literacy in competency-based education.”

The opening of New York University’s new program in Shanghai, China, offered a unique opportunity to work with students from a variety of cultural groups. Raymond Pun and Heng (Helen) Ge reflect on their challenges and learning opportunities in their article “The first year research experience at New York University-Shanghai.”

In this issue’s Scholarly Communication column, Monica Berger and Jill Cirasella look “Beyond Beall’s List” to better understand predatory scholarly publishers.

Archives and special collections continue to play a major role in academic and research libraries. Eddie Woodward looks at “Building relationships” between archives, archivists, and alumni; and Matt Gorzalski discusses “Archives and non-Humanities students” in this month’s issue.

Also this month we continue our look at the upcoming ALA/ACRL elections with responses from the candidates for ALA vice-president/president-elect to questions from the ACRL Board of Directors. This issue also includes a list of ACRL members running for ALA Council. Vote for the candidates of your choice in the election beginning March 24.

Make sure to check out the other features and departments, including an ACRL TechConnect article on the use of “Body apps” in anatomy and physiology instruction, information on our 75th anniversary commissioned publication; and a The Way I See It essay by Tony Horava on teaching 21st-century collection development to LIS students.

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