Category Archives: Standards and Guidelines

Standards for Distance Learning Library Services Draft Revision

The Distance Learning Section (DLS) Standards Committee has prepared a draft revision of the 2008 Standards for Distance Learning Library Services and is seeking comments before completing final revisions and submitting the standards for approval. The draft of the standard is available on the section website. Please submit comments through the website or directly to DLS Standards Committee Chair Harvey Gover (hgover@tricity.wsu.edu) no later than December 1, 2014.

Your Comments Matter; 3rd Draft of Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education Forthcoming by mid-November

small_bannerOver the past few months, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Information Literacy Standards Task Force has continued its work revising the proposed Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and expects to release the third draft by mid-November, with comments due by mid-December. As the higher education association for librarians, ACRL is committed to developing and maintaining forward thinking standards and guidelines that impact student learning across the campus community. The seminal Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, first adopted in 2000 by ACRL, have defined information literacy for librarians, educators, and assessment agencies. A task force charged by the ACRL Board has been working on the new Framework since March 2013. In recent months, they have been carefully reviewing the many good ideas and suggestions from the library community, and others, through both formal and informal channels since the release of the first draft of the Framework in February 2014.

In response to the rich feedback, the task force has updated its Frequently Asked Questions page to include a detailed FAQ explaining the methods used to analyze the extensive comments and the process used to make changes in the forthcoming third draft Framework.  By mid-November, along with an updated version of the Framework itself, an expanded set of FAQs will also be posted that address specific issue raised in the library community about the Framework during the past year.  These new FAQs will respond to a range of topics, including assessment, the role of knowledge practices and dispositions, and the research behind threshold concepts as a foundation for the Framework.

Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education Progressing; Third Draft for Comment Expected November 1

small_bannerMembers of ACRL’s Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force are hard at work analyzing all the feedback to the June 17 revised draft Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. The Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, adopted by ACRL in 2000, has become an essential document related to the emergence of information literacy as a recognized learning outcome at many institutions of higher education. These, like all ACRL standards, are reviewed cyclically and a task force charged with creating the Framework has been working since March 2013. They are carefully reviewing responses provided to the revised draft Framework this summer through the questionnaire, in person and online forums, social media outlets, and personal communications to Task Force members.

The responses from the community have provided sufficient ideas that the task force will spend additional time revising the document. They expect the revisions to be substantive enough to warrant an additional period of review by ACRL members and the community before sending to the ACRL Board of Directors for a vote. Therefore the task force will extend their timeline, as the Board offered during its June 28 meeting. (See the August 13 information memo from the task force co-chairs to the Board.)

At this point, the task force tentatively plans to release a third draft for comment on November 1, 2014. They would submit a final Framework and recommendations to the ACRL Board of Directors by early January 2015 for a vote at the 2015 ALA Midwinter Meeting.

As they continue to carefully consider all feedback they have received, task force members will continue to address recurring questions/concerns via the Frequently Asked Question section of their website. Expect new content to be added there in the weeks ahead.

FAQs on IL Framework available; Reminder: online hearings July 7 and 11, comments due July 15

small_bannerMembers of the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force are grateful for all the robust input gathered through online feedback forms, member forums and hearings (face-to-face and online), member emails, conversations in social media, as well as comments from the ACRL Board of Directors. The Task Force takes the feedback provided by members seriously, and has used this feedback to guide and improve their process. They have been listening to all of your comments and incorporating much of the feedback into the latest, revised draft. As they continue to carefully consider all the new input they receive, task force members recognize some questions/concerns are recurring and have addressed those in a new Frequently Asked Question section of their website.

They are eager to hear more from you about their latest, revised draft. Please be sure to please share your thoughts if you haven’t already done so. Sign up to participate in one of the online hearings being held Monday, July 7, at 1pm Central and Friday, July 11, at 10am Central. Provide your written feedback by Tuesday, July 15, 2014, 5pm Central, via the online form. To help guide your thinking, the task force asks that you consider these questions:

  1. How satisfied are you with the overall Framework?
  2. If you have followed the development of the Framework through the previous draft, please tell us what changes you find most helpful.
  3. Does the “Suggestions on How to Use the Information Literacy Framework” section, in conjunction with the Frames, help you to engage other campus stakeholders in conversation?
  4. How might the Framework affect the way you work with students?
  5. What one thing do you most want the Task Force members to know about the draft Framework?

While the task force asks that you send reactions via the online form (so it is easier to compile comments and ensure no emails have gone astray) the co-chairs are also happy to connect with you on a personal level. You should feel free to be in touch with them to discuss your reactions to the draft and can reach them as follows: Craig Gibson, Head, Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences Library, Ohio State University Libraries, gibson.721@osu.edu; and Trudi E. Jacobson, Head, Information Literacy Department, University at Albany, SUNY, University Libraries, tjacobson@albany.edu.

ACRL seeks feedback on revised Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education

small_bannerThe Association of College and Research Libraries’ (ACRL) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force seeks feedback on the revised draft of the association’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.

The Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, adopted by ACRL in 2000, has become an essential document related to the emergence of information literacy as a recognized learning outcome at many institutions of higher education. These, like all ACRL standards, are reviewed cyclically. In June 2012, the ACRL Board of Directors approved a unanimous recommendation that they be a significantly revised. A task force charged with creating the Framework has been working since March 2013 and shared a first draft this spring.

“The revision of the ACRL information literacy standards is vital in order for our libraries and librarians to think about, understand, and use new methods of incorporating information fluency in our curricula. I’m pleased with the work of the task force thus far and look forward to the completion – and implementation – of the new Framework,” said ACRL President Trevor A. Dawes of Washington University in St. Louis.

Since the publication of the first standards, the information environment has evolved into a fragmented, complex information ecosystem that demands greater sense-making and metacognition from the student.

“The Framework offers possibilities for thinking about information literacy in a more holistic way and for designing more coherent programs based on genuine collaboration,” said Co-Chair of the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force Craig Gibson of Ohio State University Libraries.

The new Framework seeks to address the interconnected nature of the abilities, practices and dispositions of the student, moving away from the hierarchical and formulaic approach of the current standards.

“Preliminary conversations about the Framework with both librarians and faculty at a number of institutions suggest increasing excitement about and engagement with the potential it provides,” said Trudi E. Jacobson, co-chair of the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force and head of the Information Literacy Department at the University at Albany, SUNY University Libraries.

The revised draft Framework, along with questions to guide the review and feedback process, is now available on the task force website. An in-person hearing is scheduled for 10:30 am – 11:30 am on Saturday, June 28, at the 2014 ALA Annual Conference in Las Vegas. Two additional online hearings will take place on Monday, July 7, and Friday, July 11, 2014. Sign-up for the July online hearings is available on the task force website.

Please provide feedback on the revised draft by 5pm Central on Tuesday, July 15, 2014, via an online form.

Contact ACRL Senior Strategist for Special Initiatives Kara Malenfant with questions.

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