Category Archives: Scholarly Communication

New Updated Version of ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit Released

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) has released a new version of its popular Scholarly Communication Toolkit with updated content. The Toolkit, developed and maintained by the ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee, continues to provide content and context on a broad range of scholarly communication topics, including expanded information on data management. It provides links to examples of specific tools, including handouts, presentations, and videos for libraries to use on their own campuses, and for library school students seeking to incorporate these issues into their course work. The Toolkit is also widely used by libraries in conjunction with Open Access Week, an annual global event promoting open models of scholarly communication, that will occur from October 20-24, 2014. The ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit is freely available online.

Next Steps for Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy

Editor’s Note: In this post, Joyce L. Ogburn, Chair of ACRL’s Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy Task Force, provides an update on Task Force activities.

In 2013, ACRL issued two major publications that integrate two strong ACRL programs — information literacy and scholarly communication. The first publication to be issued was a white paper that articulated salient issues and potential connections between these two areas. [1] Close on its heels, ACRL published an open access book with contributed chapters that explored many different crossovers and intersections. [2]

In 2014, the ACRL Board appointed a task force to continue the efforts. Specifically, the task force was charged with “monitoring and responding to reactions to the white paper and use of the white paper, as well as proposing and delivering sustainable professional development opportunities building on the ideas and recommendations in the white paper.” We began our work at the ALA Midwinter Meeting, and this column summarizes our work to date.

  • Three members of the task force, along with ACRL Executive Director Mary Ellen Davis, gave a project briefing at the April 2014 CNI meeting. The discussion elicited new arenas for librarians to explore: e-portfolios; accessibility issues; undergraduate research; digital citizenship; digital identity and security of personal information; student services; and campus IT.  We encourage you to consider how these suggestions might play out on your campus. [3]
  • Three members of the task force published an article in the September 2014 issue of C&RL News addressing the work of the task force and how their libraries are applying emerging concepts. Take a look at what each is doing. [4]
  • The task force is contributing to ACRL’s new initiative on data management by addressing the concept of data literacy. A section on data literacy, with text drawn from the white paper, was added as a resources link in the Scholarly Communication Toolkit data management tab. [5]
  • We will be offering webinars with such topics as including scholarly communication with information literacy in job descriptions and expectations for librarians. Be watching for announcements.
  • A panel session at the ACRL 2015 Conference in Portland, Oregon, will engage attendees in dialogue to inform the final report, which is due to the board before the 2015 ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco. Please come join the conversation.

There are more activities in the planning stages. We want to hear from members who are using the white paper, perhaps as a guide to incorporating new topics into information literacy instruction, embedding information in research guides, developing targeted workshops for new services such as open access publishing or managing intellectual property rights, or working in new ways with partners on campus. We encourage you to add your ideas and activities in the comments section of this posting.

Task Force Members: Jeff Belliston, Barbara DeFelice, Mel Desart, Terri Fishel, Julia Gelfand, Merinda Kaye Hensley, Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Joyce Ogburn, Kevin Smith, Jean Zanoni, Kara Malenfant (ACRL Staff Liaison)

Resources Cited:

1. ACRL (2013). Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy: Creating Strategic Collaborations for a Changing Academic Environment. Chicago: ACRL. http://acrl.ala.org/intersections/.

2. Stephanie Davis-Kahl and Merinda Kaye Hensley, eds. (2013). Common Ground at the Nexus of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication. ChicagoACRL.
http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/publications/booksanddigitalresources/digital/commonground_oa.pdf.

3. Mary Ellen Davis, Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Merinda Kaye Hensley, and Joyce L. Ogburn (2014). “Enriching How We Teach and Learn:  The Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy.” Project Briefing, CNI April 1, 2014. http://www.cni.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/tuesday_ogburn_acrl_-enriching.pdf.

4. Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Teresa A. Fishel, and Merinda Kaye Hensley (2014). “Weaving the Threads of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy into Academic Librarian Roles.” C&RL News, September: 441- 444. http://crln.acrl.org/content/75/8/441.full.pdf+html.

5. Data Literacy Essay (2014). ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit. http://acrl.ala.org/scholcomm/?page_id=330.

- Joyce L. Ogburn, Chair, Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy Task Force

Why ACRL uses Creative Commons licenses and opposes STM association model licenses

small_bannerThe Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) recently joined a letter opposing a set of model licenses released by the International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers (STM). The signatories of the letter call on the STM association to withdraw the model licenses and recommend to its member publishers that they work within the Creative Commons framework instead of offering their own customized open access licenses. These licenses increase confusion and decrease interoperability as they are not compatible with any of the globally used Creative Commons licenses — the de facto global standard for open content licensing, adopted by a broad-based community.

As part of our commitment to transforming scholarship, all articles in ACRL’s scholarly research journal College & Research Libraries are published under a Creative Commons (CC) BY-NC license. The association feels that publishing under a CC license promotes openness and allows for research to be used in a variety of ways both in the library and information science field and beyond. Our members, strong advocates for innovation in scholarly communication, understand the importance of Creative Commons licensing and appreciate the ability to publish their research with CC licenses through their association. ACRL has published approximately 125 peer reviewed scholarly articles under the CC BY-NC license since 2012. Our commitment to innovation through transparent licensing extends to our news magazine, book, research report, and white paper publishing program as well, where we allow article, chapter and report authors to indicate the use of a CC license as part of their publication agreement with ACRL.

Creative Commons licenses are designed to be easy to read, easy to use, they effectively complement copyright, and they enjoy broad support across a wide range of scholarly and creative communities. The STM association’s proposed open access model licenses are unnecessary and overly complex. They introduce restrictions to control uses that should either be considered fair uses or are outside of the exclusive rights of copyright holders: e.g., non-expressive use in data mining and terms that would control how works are interpreted.  They would place additional burdens on authors to police down-stream uses and enforce third-party copyrights. Vague requirements like “maintain the integrity of the Work/Article” are difficult to interpret and likely to have a chilling effect on users. These licenses will not effectively advance scholarship and they introduce confusion at a time when we most need terms that can be easily interpreted and understood. For all these reasons, ACRL believes Creative Commons licenses better serve the needs of scholarly publishers and authors and the STM association model licenses are unnecessary.

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The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) is the higher education association for librarians. Representing more than 11,500 academic and research librarians and interested individuals, ACRL (a division of the American Library Association) is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to help academic and research librarians learn, innovate and lead within the academic community. Founded in 1940, ACRL is committed to advancing learning and transforming scholarship. ACRL is on the Web at www.acrl.org/, Facebook at www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

Upcoming ACRL webcast – Cultivating Creators: Copyright in the Information Literacy Classroom

Cultivating Creators: Copyright in the Information Literacy Classroom
ACRL e-Learning Webcast

August 5, 2014
11 a.m. Pacific | 12:00 p.m. Mountain | 1:00 p.m. Central | 2:00 p.m. Eastern

90 minutes

Description: Information literacy and scholarly communication librarians are working together to create avenues for increased collaboration in the classroom. The Framework for Information Literacy and the Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy white paper, plus continuing task force work within ACRL, demonstrates progress towards aligning scholarly communication education within undergraduate and graduate student information literacy outreach. This webcast will focus on how librarians can integrate copyright into the classroom with undergraduate and graduate students to raise awareness of not only ethically using others’ work, but also how to consider their rights and responsibilities as creators and copyright holders of their own work.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Share strategies for discussing copyright with students in order to build instructional literacy for librarians.
  • Contextualize copyright and Creative Commons licenses within information literacy instruction in order to increase professional knowledge about scholarly communication.
  • Raise awareness of different options for sharing scholarship and creative activity among librarians in order to close the loop in information literacy instruction.

Presenter(s): Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Scholarly Communications Librarian/Associate Professor, Illinois Wesleyan University; Molly Keener, Scholarly Communication Librarian, Wake Forest University

Complete details and registration materials are online at http://www.ala.org/acrl/copyrightinclassroom.

If you have a question about an e-Learning opportunity or need technical assistance, please contact Margot Conahan (mconahan@ala.org).

ACRL announces new presenters for workshop “Scholarly Communications: From Understanding to Engagement”

SC workshop blockThe ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee is pleased to announce the selection of Amy Buckland, Jenny Oleen, and Jaron Porciello as the newest presenters for the workshop “Scholarly Communication: From Understanding to Engagement,” which is offered to institutions across the country on an ongoing basis. Amy, Jenny, and Jaron join the team of experienced presenters as collegial partners in shaping the curriculum and presenting the popular workshop. Amy Buckland is Coordinator, Scholarly Communications, McGill University; Jenny Oleen is Scholarly Communication Librarian, Western Washington University; and Jaron Porciello is Digital Scholarship Initiatives Coordinator, Digital Scholarship and Preservation Services, Cornell University.

“We are very pleased to have three new presenters, Amy, Jaron, and Jenny, join ACRL’s scholarly communication workshop “roadshow” team of presenters. This is a valued workshop for the library community, which has evolved to meet the changing needs of the community and the changing nature of scholarly communication. I’m confident these new presenters will contribute to the continued success of the roadshow, bringing new energy and ideas,” said Chair of the ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee Lisa Macklin of Emory University. The search committee, comprised of members of the ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee and a representative of the current presenter group, was led by committee member Scott Mandernack of Marquette University.

The program continues its cost-sharing model as ACRL is committed to underwriting the bulk of the expense for delivering the workshop five times each year. Stay tuned for more information in fall 2014 about how you can apply to host the competitive subsidized version. In addition, you may bring this one-day workshop, at full cost, to your campus, chapter, or consortia at any time year round.

New this year, the presenter team is developing virtual programming through live webcasts as part of ACRL’s e-Learning program. Register now for their first webcast, Cultivating Creators: Copyright in the Information Literacy Classroom, offered August 5, 2014.

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