Category Archives: Scholarly Communication

ACRL Releases Updated Scholarly Communication Toolkit

ACRL has released a new version of its popular Scholarly Communication Toolkit. The Toolkit has been updated with new and revised content and is now hosted through Springshare’s LibGuides. The Toolkit, developed and maintained by the ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee (ReSEC), continues to provide content and context on a broad range of scholarly communications topics and offers resources and tools for the practitioner. ACRL and ReSEC tapped Christine Fruin, scholarly communications librarian at the University of Florida, to completely revise and redesign the Toolkit and migrate it to ACRL’s LibGuides. The new Toolkit now features sections on topics such as fair use, public access mandates, and library publishing in addition to more fully developed sections on open access publishing and repositories.

“When I was a new librarian ten years ago, just learning about the field of scholarly communications, the Toolkit was an invaluable resource for me and I am honored to have the opportunity to share my knowledge and experience through the revised guide with my fellow librarians,” said Fruin. “LibGuides is a platform familiar to academic librarians and will allow easier reuse and repurposing at other libraries. It will also aid the distributed editorial control of the site that ReSEC would like to maintain.”

Since its launch in 2005, the Toolkit has undergone several revisions and migrations. The Toolkit continues to provide links to examples of specific tools, including handouts, presentations, and videos for libraries to use on their own campuses, and for library school students seeking to incorporate these issues into their course work.

“Because scholarly communications is such a dynamic environment, we like to maintain a freshness and vitality to the Toolkit,” noted ReSEC chair Amy Buckland, institutional repository manager at the University of Chicago.

The Toolkit is also widely used by libraries in conjunction with Open Access Week, an annual global event promoting open models of scholarly communication, which will take place October 24-30, 2016. The ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit is freely available online and licensed through Creative Commons. ReSEC welcomes feedback and suggestions for additions to the Toolkit through the link provided on the home page.

ACRL Comments on NSF Strategic Plan

On September 26, 2016, ACRL provided feedback to the National Science Foundation (NSF) in preparation for updates to its Strategic Plan. As reflected in previous ACRL support for governmental policies and legislation that facilitate open access and open education, including the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) mandate (mentioned in the NSF strategic plan) and the Fair Access to Science & Technology Research Act and Federal Research Public Access Act bills, ACRL is fundamentally committed to the open exchange of information to empower individuals and facilitate scientific discovery. In the comments to NSF, ACRL offered six recommendations to allow for research data and articles to be freely shared:

  1. Accelerate scientific discovery by encouraging the use of the shortest possible – or no – embargo period for access to NSF-funded publications;
  2. Improve the discoverability, utility and value of NSF-funded articles by depositing them in the PubMed Central repository, which currently houses more than four million articles from the NIH and six other Federal agencies in a standardized, machine-readable XML format;
  3. “Public access” is not “open access” – ensure that NSF articles meet OSTP requirements for enabling productive reuses – including computational analysis, and text and data mining – by requiring the use of a standard open license;
  4. The OSTP memorandum of February, 2013 speaks equally to public access to scientific publications and to scientific data in digital formats. NSF should improve the Agency’s accountability and transparency by requiring that data underlying NSF articles needed to validate/reproduce the articles’ conclusions be made publicly available upon publication;
  5. Incentivize NSF researchers to freely and quickly share articles and their underlying data through funding reviews and promotion processes; and
  6. Further improve NSF’s accountability and transparency by establishing a publicly accessible mechanism to track policy compliance results, including reporting on the number of articles produced from NSF-funded research, and how many are publicly accessible.

Read more in ACRL’s full feedback to NSF.

ACRL Announces New Presenters for RDM Workshop

rdmThe ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee is pleased to announce the selection of Kristin Briney, Christina Chan-Park, Laura Palumbo, and Sarah Wright as the newest presenters for the one-day licensed workshop, Building Your Research Data Management Toolkit: Integrating RDM into Your Liaison Work. Kristin, Christina, Laura, and Sarah join the team of Abigail Goben and Megan Sapp Nelson as partners in shaping the curriculum and presenting the workshop.

Kristin Briney is Data Services Librarian, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Christina Chan-Park is the Science Librarian, Baylor University; Laura Palumbo is Chemistry and Physics Librarian/Science Data Specialist, Rutgers University; and Sarah Wright is Life Sciences Librarian for Research, Cornell University.

“We are thrilled to have Kristin Briney, Christina Chan-Park, Laura Palumbo, and Sarah Wright join Abagail Goven and Megan Sapp Nelson as the first cohort of presenters,” said ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee Chair Amy Buckland of the University of Chicago. “Not only does this group bring a tremendous amount of expertise on a topic that is still new to many librarians, but the enthusiasm with which they have taken on their new roles will ensure these workshops are effective and engaging.”

The RDM licensed workshop will be offered as a “roadshow” along with the existing Planning, Assessing, and Communicating Library Impact: Putting the Standards for Libraries in Higher Education into Action, Scholarly Communication: From Understanding to Engagement, and newly developed Building a Curriculum on the Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy workshops.

The RDM workshop will be available upon request on a licensed basis starting in fall 2016. Bring the one day workshop to your campus, chapter, or consortia at any time year-round.

Contact Chase Ollis, Program Coordinator, at collis@ala.org with questions.

ACRL announces new presenters for Intersections workshop

The ACRL Student Learning and Information Literacy Committee is pleased to announce the selection of Emma Molls, Joelle Pitts, and Michelle Reed as the newest presenters for the one-day licensed workshop, “Building a Curriculum on the Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy.”  Emma, Joelle, and Michelle join the team of Maryam Fakouri and John Watts as partners in shaping the curriculum and presenting the workshop.

Emma Molls is the Publishing Services Librarian at University of Minnesota; Joelle Pitts is the Instructional Design Librarian/Associate Professor, Kansas State University; and Michelle Reed is the Undergraduate Learning Specialist, University of Kansas.

“We’re very excited to welcome Emma, Joelle, and Michelle to the team of presenters for the Intersections licensed workshop,” said past Chair of the ACRL Student Learning and Information Literacy Committee Merinda Hensley of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  “This next step in the Intersections initiative is really exciting – we now have five excellent minds coming together to promote learning for librarians on how to further incorporate scholarly communication into their information literacy sessions. I am really looking forward to how the curriculum designers expand the conversation in relation to the Framework and how it will impact these new professional development opportunities.”

The Intersections licensed workshop will be offered as a “roadshow” as with the existing ACRL Building your Research Data Management Toolkit: Integrating RDM into Your Liaison Work, Planning, Assessing, and Communicating Library Impact: Putting the Standards for Libraries in Higher Education into Action, and Scholarly Communication: From Understanding to Engagement workshops.

The Intersections workshop will be available upon request on a licensed basis starting in fall 2016.  Stay tuned for more information about how you can bring the one day to your campus, chapter, or consortia at any time year round.

Contact Margot Conahan, Manager of Professional Development, at mconahan@ala.org or call 312-280-2522 with questions.

ACRL Issues Policy Statement on Open Access to Scholarship by Academic Librarians

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is pleased to announce its new Policy Statement on Open Access to Scholarship by Academic Librarians, which reads:

Scholarship by academic librarians advances the fields of library and information science, influences practices of aligned professions, and informs effective advocacy. In support of broad and timely dissemination of library and information science scholarship, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) encourages academic librarians to publish in open access journals. When academic librarians choose to publish in subscription-based journals, ACRL recommends a standard practice of depositing the final accepted manuscript in a repository to make that version openly accessible. The author should be responsible for determining at what date the deposited manuscript becomes openly accessible, taking into account applicable institutional or funder policies, as well as other relevant considerations. ACRL further encourages academic librarians to make other forms of scholarship, such as monographs, presentations, grey literature, and data, openly accessible.

It is also imperative that publishers of library and information science scholarship explore and implement publishing models to make their content openly accessible as soon as possible. Librarians who are editors, reviewers, and authors should assist with this effort by engaging with their publishers about these models.

Approved by the ACRL Board of Directors at their meeting on June 25, 2016, the policy statement was developed by ACRL’s research and scholarly environment committee with feedback from members and the broader community then vetted by the ACRL standards committee.

“As our profession adapts to new roles and a changing academic landscape, it is timely to have an official policy statement encouraging academic librarians to model open access publishing decisions for their own work as they advocate for discipline faculty and researchers to choose open access outlets to disseminate their research,” remarked ACRL president Irene M.H. Herold, university librarian at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa.

“This is an important step in affirming widely-held values and norms in the profession regarding open access,” noted Shan C. Sutton, immediate past chair of ACRL’s research and scholarly environment committee and vice dean of university libraries at the University of Arizona. “More broadly, the policy statement could serve as a model for other professional organizations and scholarly societies to emulate in advocating for open access among their own members.”

Find the statement online with ACRL’s other statements, guidelines, standards and frameworks at http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards.

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