Category Archives: Scholarly Communication

COUNTER Code of Practice Release 5

COUNTER recently published Release 5 of the COUNTER Code of Practice. The new release internally consistent, unambiguous, and flexible, so that it will be easier for publishers to be compliant and so that the Code of Practice can be adapted and extended as digital publishing changes over the years. The new Code of Practice becomes effective from January 1, 2019.

COUNTER is eager to support librarians, answer questions about Release 5, keep the community updated on the publication of library support guides. Librarians can register to be included in an email forum to receive more details.

More information is available on the COUNTER website.

ACRL OpenCon 2017 Scholarship Opportunity: Shape the Future of Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data!

OpenCon 2017Join the next generation of advocates and scholars to shape the future of Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data!

Are you a librarian who’s passionate about opening up access to educational and scholarly resources? Keen on being part of a community that’s dedicated to and engaged in OA advocacy? Then OpenCon 2017 is the conference and community for you. Now in its fourth year, you must apply and be selected to attend OpenCon in person. (Anyone can attend remotely; find out more about satellite venues and other opportunities for participating in the community virtually.)

ACRL is providing scholarship funding for two librarians to attend OpenCon 2017 in Berlin, Germany, November 11-13. To be eligible for selection, just follow the OpenCon application process and instructions. If you are a librarian and have already applied, then great! If you are chosen to participate in OpenCon and are an ACRL member, you will be considered for an ACRL-sponsored scholarship. Your information will be conveyed to a group of ACRL member leaders for review and selection.

Besides the benefit of attending OpenCon, each recipient of the ACRL-sponsored scholarships will also be appointed for a 2-year term on ACRL’s Research and the Scholarly Environment Committee! Thus, if selected, you’ll have a chance to build on what you gained from OpenCon and contribute to scholarly communication initiatives that ACRL works on.

The application deadline is August 1, 2017. Apply soon and have a chance to attend OpenCon on an ACRL scholarship!

New Presenters for ACRL Scholarly Communication Workshop

The ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee is pleased to announce the selection of Elizabeth Brown, Carla Myers, and Rachael Samberg as the newest presenters for the one-day workshop, Scholarly Communication: From Understanding to Engagement. Elizabeth, Carla, and Rachael join the current presenter team as partners in shaping the curriculum and presenting the workshop.

Elizabeth Brown is the Director of Assessment and Scholarly Communications, Binghamton University; Carla Myers is the Scholarly Communications Coordinator, Miami University; and Rachael Samberg is the Scholarly Communications Officer, University of California, Berkeley.

“We are thrilled to have Elizabeth Brown, Carla Myers, and Rachael Samberg join the presenter team for the Scholarly Communication workshop,” said ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee Chair Amy Buckland of the University of Guelph. “Not only does this group bring a wealth of expertise on a topic considered to be a core competency of the academic librarianship profession, but the enthusiasm with which they have taken on their new roles will ensure these workshops continue to empower participants to help accelerate the transformation of the scholarly communication system.”

The Scholarly Communication workshop is currently offered as a “roadshow” as part of ACRL’s slate of day-long licensed workshops that can be brought to your campus, chapter, or consortia at any time year-round. Contact Chase Ollis, ACRL Program Officer, at collis@ala.org with questions or to discuss dates, pricing, and details about bringing a workshop to your institution.

ACRL Supports Open Data Legislation

On April 5, 2017, ACRL joined over 80 other organizations in signing a coalition letter supporting the Open, Public, Electronic and Necessary (OPEN) Government Data Act, reintroduced by a bicameral and bipartisan group of lawmakers on March 29, 2017, as S. 760 and H.R. 1770. The OPEN Government Data Act will require all federal agencies to publish their information online, using non-proprietary, machine-readable data formats.

The bill codifies and expands the 2013 government-wide Open Data policy (“Open Data Policy-Managing Information as an Asset”, M-13-13), which has been integrated into agency policy for the past three years. It is similar to what was passed by the Senate last Congress.

In summary, the legislation would:

  • Require federal agencies to take the next step in publishing their data sets in a truly accessible manner in open formats and as machine-readable data;
  • Help create a map of all federal data sets;
  • Empower agency Chief Information Officers to improve the quality of the data they are publishing; and
  • Write meaningful open data definitions into US law to enable smarter legislation in the future.

The coalition letter is being sent to relevant Congressional committees. Supporting this legislation is consistent with ACRL’s strategic goal to accelerate the transition to more open and equitable systems of scholarship and, more specifically, the strategic objective that ACRL is an advocate for open dissemination practices.

ACRL Statement on the Dissemination of Federal Research

Editor’s note: The following statement was approved by the ACRL Board of Directors on February 23, 2017. The Board wishes to acknowledge the ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee’s input and work in drafting the statement.

As the higher education organization for librarians, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is dedicated to the advancement of learning and to the transformation of scholarship. ACRL is unwavering in its long-standing commitment to promoting the free exchange of different viewpoints and ensuring privacy and confidentiality in academic libraries. In the spirit of previous statements, ACRL reaffirms its dedication to its core values: visionary leadership; transformation, new ideas, and global perspectives; exemplary service to members; diversity, integrity, and transparency; continuous learning; responsible stewardship of resources; the values of higher education; and intellectual freedom. One of ACRL’s objectives is that “librarians accelerate the transition to more open and equitable systems of scholarship.” Recent actions from the new Executive Branch agencies have cast the realization of this goal into jeopardy, and they run counter to the American Library Association’s Library Bill of Rights and Core Values of Librarianship. These values are essential to academic advancement across the institutions we serve in the United States and abroad.

Agency orders to cease communication with the public – as well as a directive calling for the submission of EPA publications to administration review – had to be walked back in response to public outcry, but they set worrisome examples. These federal agencies are taxpayer-supported, and their outputs for public consumption and understanding are an essential service to everyone. Actions that silence scientists and other specialists employed by these agencies set dangerous precedents for fair and open, democratic governance and hinder the advancement of scientific knowledge by restricting the dissemination of research.

Privileging political viewpoints, rather than facts, erodes our country’s values of democracy, liberty, and equality. Limiting the ability of scientists and other educators to communicate with the public jeopardizes the creation of new knowledge. It is critical to maintain open communication from the government to the public, especially to support efforts to enfranchise disadvantaged and underrepresented populations, who rely on access to publicly available resources to make economic and health decisions. If these restrictive acts go unchallenged, we potentially set in motion an era of complacency that could devolve into acceptance of suppression and a mindset that discourages civic engagement and undermines the principles of democracy, which rely on an engaged population.

ACRL considers it an ethical and professional responsibility to challenge attempts to call into question the validity of facts simply because they run counter to the establishment’s agenda, or to subvert access to information.

1 2 3 4 40