Category Archives: Scholarly Communication

Why ACRL uses Creative Commons licenses and opposes STM association model licenses

small_bannerThe Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) recently joined a letter opposing a set of model licenses released by the International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers (STM). The signatories of the letter call on the STM association to withdraw the model licenses and recommend to its member publishers that they work within the Creative Commons framework instead of offering their own customized open access licenses. These licenses increase confusion and decrease interoperability as they are not compatible with any of the globally used Creative Commons licenses – the de facto global standard for open content licensing, adopted by a broad-based community.

As part of our commitment to transforming scholarship, all articles in ACRL’s scholarly research journal College & Research Libraries are published under a Creative Commons (CC) BY-NC license. The association feels that publishing under a CC license promotes openness and allows for research to be used in a variety of ways both in the library and information science field and beyond. Our members, strong advocates for innovation in scholarly communication, understand the importance of Creative Commons licensing and appreciate the ability to publish their research with CC licenses through their association. ACRL has published approximately 125 peer reviewed scholarly articles under the CC BY-NC license since 2012. Our commitment to innovation through transparent licensing extends to our news magazine, book, research report, and white paper publishing program as well, where we allow article, chapter and report authors to indicate the use of a CC license as part of their publication agreement with ACRL.

Creative Commons licenses are designed to be easy to read, easy to use, they effectively complement copyright, and they enjoy broad support across a wide range of scholarly and creative communities. The STM association’s proposed open access model licenses are unnecessary and overly complex. They introduce restrictions to control uses that should either be considered fair uses or are outside of the exclusive rights of copyright holders: e.g., non-expressive use in data mining and terms that would control how works are interpreted.  They would place additional burdens on authors to police down-stream uses and enforce third-party copyrights. Vague requirements like “maintain the integrity of the Work/Article” are difficult to interpret and likely to have a chilling effect on users. These licenses will not effectively advance scholarship and they introduce confusion at a time when we most need terms that can be easily interpreted and understood. For all these reasons, ACRL believes Creative Commons licenses better serve the needs of scholarly publishers and authors and the STM association model licenses are unnecessary.

##

The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) is the higher education association for librarians. Representing more than 11,500 academic and research librarians and interested individuals, ACRL (a division of the American Library Association) is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to help academic and research librarians learn, innovate and lead within the academic community. Founded in 1940, ACRL is committed to advancing learning and transforming scholarship. ACRL is on the Web at www.acrl.org/, Facebook at www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

Upcoming ACRL webcast – Cultivating Creators: Copyright in the Information Literacy Classroom

Cultivating Creators: Copyright in the Information Literacy Classroom
ACRL e-Learning Webcast

August 5, 2014
11 a.m. Pacific | 12:00 p.m. Mountain | 1:00 p.m. Central | 2:00 p.m. Eastern

90 minutes

Description: Information literacy and scholarly communication librarians are working together to create avenues for increased collaboration in the classroom. The Framework for Information Literacy and the Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy white paper, plus continuing task force work within ACRL, demonstrates progress towards aligning scholarly communication education within undergraduate and graduate student information literacy outreach. This webcast will focus on how librarians can integrate copyright into the classroom with undergraduate and graduate students to raise awareness of not only ethically using others’ work, but also how to consider their rights and responsibilities as creators and copyright holders of their own work.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Share strategies for discussing copyright with students in order to build instructional literacy for librarians.
  • Contextualize copyright and Creative Commons licenses within information literacy instruction in order to increase professional knowledge about scholarly communication.
  • Raise awareness of different options for sharing scholarship and creative activity among librarians in order to close the loop in information literacy instruction.

Presenter(s): Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Scholarly Communications Librarian/Associate Professor, Illinois Wesleyan University; Molly Keener, Scholarly Communication Librarian, Wake Forest University

Complete details and registration materials are online at http://www.ala.org/acrl/copyrightinclassroom.

If you have a question about an e-Learning opportunity or need technical assistance, please contact Margot Conahan (mconahan@ala.org).

ACRL announces new presenters for workshop “Scholarly Communications: From Understanding to Engagement”

SC workshop blockThe ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee is pleased to announce the selection of Amy Buckland, Jenny Oleen, and Jaron Porciello as the newest presenters for the workshop “Scholarly Communication: From Understanding to Engagement,” which is offered to institutions across the country on an ongoing basis. Amy, Jenny, and Jaron join the team of experienced presenters as collegial partners in shaping the curriculum and presenting the popular workshop. Amy Buckland is Coordinator, Scholarly Communications, McGill University; Jenny Oleen is Scholarly Communication Librarian, Western Washington University; and Jaron Porciello is Digital Scholarship Initiatives Coordinator, Digital Scholarship and Preservation Services, Cornell University.

“We are very pleased to have three new presenters, Amy, Jaron, and Jenny, join ACRL’s scholarly communication workshop “roadshow” team of presenters. This is a valued workshop for the library community, which has evolved to meet the changing needs of the community and the changing nature of scholarly communication. I’m confident these new presenters will contribute to the continued success of the roadshow, bringing new energy and ideas,” said Chair of the ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee Lisa Macklin of Emory University. The search committee, comprised of members of the ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee and a representative of the current presenter group, was led by committee member Scott Mandernack of Marquette University.

The program continues its cost-sharing model as ACRL is committed to underwriting the bulk of the expense for delivering the workshop five times each year. Stay tuned for more information in fall 2014 about how you can apply to host the competitive subsidized version. In addition, you may bring this one-day workshop, at full cost, to your campus, chapter, or consortia at any time year round.

New this year, the presenter team is developing virtual programming through live webcasts as part of ACRL’s e-Learning program. Register now for their first webcast, Cultivating Creators: Copyright in the Information Literacy Classroom, offered August 5, 2014.

SPARC and ACRL Announce Speakers for 2014 Forum in Las Vegas, NV

Please join SPARC and ACRL for a joint forum during the ALA Annual Conference on Saturday, June 28, 2014, from 3:00-4:30pm on the topic of “Evaluating the Quality of Open Access Content.” The program will take place at Bally’s Las Vegas – Skyview 5.

Our community has worked hard to make a growing number of resources open, from journal articles, to textbooks, to datasets. While this has resulted in a robust body of open content, one question that commonly arises is “How do I determine the quality of this content?”

New strategies for assessing the quality of open content are emerging from different quarters. These strategies range from new methods of peer review, such as open peer-review or post publication peer-review; new methods of measuring impact, such as alternative metrics; and new forms of annotation, such as data set annotation and open comments on publications.

This forum will explore the challenges and opportunities of evaluating open content, across disciplines and across resources types, while identifying promising pathways to identify and use quality open content.

We are pleased to announce our featured speakers:

  • Brian Bot, Senior Scientist, sage Bionetworks
  • Korey Jackson, Gray Family Chair for Innovative Library Services, Oregon State University
  • Kristen Ratan, Chief Publications and Products Officer, Public Library of Science

The forum will also include ample time for discussion with the audience – SPARC and ACRL look forward to seeing you there!

Closing the Loop: Evaluating Your Key Scholarly Communication Programs and Services

Many libraries have been operating scholarly communication programs or providing scholarly communication services for several years. We have identified what is important to our communities. We have thought strategically about what services we might best offer. We have discussed how we might organize ourselves to deliver those services. How can we maximize the impact of the scholarly communication programs and services we offer? How do we know we’ve achieved our intended outcomes for our target audiences? What tools can help us begin to measure those outcomes?

This half-day workshop, by the ARL/ACRL Institute on Scholarly Communication (ISC) as part of the Library Assessment Conference on August 7, 2014, in Seattle, WA, will provide participants with basic evaluation concepts and frameworks, introduce the vocabulary of evaluation, and suggest a step-by-step process for creating and implementing one’s own logic models or theory of change. Examples will be drawn from both the field of academic and research libraries and the wider nonprofit sector, to help attendees understand the broader concepts behind specific measurement tools. In the tradition of other ISC events, this workshop will emphasize active participatory learning and hands-on work. The session is appropriate both for those with some experience in program evaluation and those who are new to it.

Throughout the workshop, participants will have structured opportunities to reflect on how to apply what they are learning to scholarly communication program evaluation within their own institution, to share information and test ideas with other workshop participants, and to begin developing skills that can be used for program evaluation for activities in addition to scholarly communication.

As a result of attending this workshop, participants will:

  • Gain an understanding of basic evaluation concepts and frameworks
  • Become familiar with evaluation vocabulary and logic models
  • Begin to apply evaluation concepts to their own institutional scholarly communication programs

About the Facilitator

Catherine Brown joined the Chicago Public Library Foundation as its chief operating officer in 2013. She has more than 25 years of experience across the nonprofit sector in fund-raising, grant making, program design and evaluation, strategic planning, and internal and external communications. She created and ran her consulting practice Integrative Solutions from 2010 to 2013. From 1994 until 2010, Brown held positions of increasing responsibility at the McCormick Foundation, one of Chicago’s largest public charities. Prior to joining the foundation, she was the director of individual giving at the Lincoln Park Zoological Society in Chicago. Brown serves on the boards of Friends of Writers and the Center for New Community.

More Information and Registration

The workshop is being underwritten by the ARL/ACRL Institute on Scholarly Communication and being offered in conjunction with the Library Assessment Conference in Seattle, Washington. Registration for the conference is not required to register for the workshop.

Date & Time: Thursday, August 7, 2014, 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Location: Seattle, Washington
Fee: $80
Registration will close on July 6, 2014, unless the workshop fills earlier.
To register for the workshop only, please send an e-mail to laconf@arl.org.
To register for the conference and workshop, visit the Library Assessment Conference website.

1 2 3 26