Category Archives: Scholarly Communication

ACRL Statement on the Dissemination of Federal Research

Editor’s note: The following statement was approved by the ACRL Board of Directors on February 23, 2017. The Board wishes to acknowledge the ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee’s input and work in drafting the statement.

As the higher education organization for librarians, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) is dedicated to the advancement of learning and to the transformation of scholarship. ACRL is unwavering in its long-standing commitment to promoting the free exchange of different viewpoints and ensuring privacy and confidentiality in academic libraries. In the spirit of previous statements, ACRL reaffirms its dedication to its core values: visionary leadership; transformation, new ideas, and global perspectives; exemplary service to members; diversity, integrity, and transparency; continuous learning; responsible stewardship of resources; the values of higher education; and intellectual freedom. One of ACRL’s objectives is that “librarians accelerate the transition to more open and equitable systems of scholarship.” Recent actions from the new Executive Branch agencies have cast the realization of this goal into jeopardy, and they run counter to the American Library Association’s Library Bill of Rights and Core Values of Librarianship. These values are essential to academic advancement across the institutions we serve in the United States and abroad.

Agency orders to cease communication with the public – as well as a directive calling for the submission of EPA publications to administration review – had to be walked back in response to public outcry, but they set worrisome examples. These federal agencies are taxpayer-supported, and their outputs for public consumption and understanding are an essential service to everyone. Actions that silence scientists and other specialists employed by these agencies set dangerous precedents for fair and open, democratic governance and hinder the advancement of scientific knowledge by restricting the dissemination of research.

Privileging political viewpoints, rather than facts, erodes our country’s values of democracy, liberty, and equality. Limiting the ability of scientists and other educators to communicate with the public jeopardizes the creation of new knowledge. It is critical to maintain open communication from the government to the public, especially to support efforts to enfranchise disadvantaged and underrepresented populations, who rely on access to publicly available resources to make economic and health decisions. If these restrictive acts go unchallenged, we potentially set in motion an era of complacency that could devolve into acceptance of suppression and a mindset that discourages civic engagement and undermines the principles of democracy, which rely on an engaged population.

ACRL considers it an ethical and professional responsibility to challenge attempts to call into question the validity of facts simply because they run counter to the establishment’s agenda, or to subvert access to information.

Open Scholarship Early and Often: Join the Conversation at ACRL 2017—Register by February 22

Don’t miss this opportunity to help drive a lively discussion with your colleagues in academic libraries about how open infrastructure and open workflow tools can support the creation, preservation, and dissemination of open content.

Register before February 22, 2017, for this Association of Research Libraries (ARL)/Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Institute on Scholarly Communication event, “Open Scholarship Early and Often,” to be held March 22, 2017, in conjunction with the 2017 ACRL Conference. Registration for the conference is separate and not required to attend this event.

Facilitators
This informal, community conversation will be facilitated by:

  • Amy Buckland, Head, Research & Scholarship, McLaughlin Library, University of Guelph
  • Rachel Frick, Executive Director, OCLC Research Library Partnership
  • Jeffrey Spies, Co-founder and Chief Technology Officer, Center for Open Science; Assistant Professor, Department of Engineering and Society, University of Virginia
  • Ana Van Gulick, Librarian, Carnegie Mellon University

Why Participate?
“Openness is more than an ideal. It is a practical and critical step in increasing scholarly efficiency, quality, and inclusivity,” said Jeffrey Spies. “Replicating and extending scholarship requires context. We have to move beyond open publications, data, code, etc., and start opening workflow.”

Ana Van Gulick said, “Learning about the researcher’s perspective on data sharing and publishing is key to supporting open scholarship on campus.”

Takeaways
As a result of participating in this conversation, you will:

  • Understand the value and potential of a thoughtful approach to workflow in order to provide more effective access and integrate with other scholarship
  • Understand the strategic importance of investing time and energy into local institutional policies and be better prepared to convey this value to others
  • Be aware of key elements needed to plan and coordinate resources for sustainable implementation of open infrastructure
  • Be better prepared to negotiate the political and cultural atmosphere around open scholarship
  • Be inspired to ensure there is a diversity of voices and the entire community is included in conversations about open scholarship, which supports a sustainable open infrastructure
  • Identify opportunities for collaboration, partnerships, and coordinated effort
  • Develop recommendations for local use at your campus (on tools to use, conversations to have, how to build trust)

Event Details and Registration
Date: Wednesday, March 22, 2017
Time: 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
Location: Baltimore (Maryland) Convention Center
Fee: $100. Registration fee includes morning refreshment and afternoon break. Lunch is on your own.
Registration: Register online by Wednesday, February 22, 2017. Registration for the ACRL 2017 Conference is separate from this event (and not required).

About the Association of Research Libraries
The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is a nonprofit organization of 124 research libraries in the US and Canada. ARL’s mission is to influence the changing environment of scholarly communication and the public policies that affect research libraries and the diverse communities they serve. ARL pursues this mission by advancing the goals of its member research libraries, providing leadership in public and information policy to the scholarly and higher education communities, fostering the exchange of ideas and expertise, facilitating the emergence of new roles for research libraries, and shaping a future environment that leverages its interests with those of allied organizations. ARL is on the web at ARL.org, Facebook at facebook.com/association.of.research.libraries, and Twitter at @ARLnews.

About the Association of College & Research Libraries
The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) is the higher education association for librarians. Representing nearly 11,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals, ACRL (a division of the American Library Association) develops programs, products, and services to help academic and research librarians learn, innovate, and lead within the academic community. Founded in 1940, ACRL is committed to advancing learning and transforming scholarship. ACRL is on the web at acrl.org, Facebook at facebook.com/ala.acrl, and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

About the Institute on Scholarly Communication
The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) jointly sponsor the Institute on Scholarly Communication (ISC) to promote the development of library-led outreach on scholarly communication issues. The institute has hundreds of alumni from numerous events forming a community that provides peer support and professional sharing of information relating to campus outreach.

ACRL Presents – Celebrating Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week, “Using Fair Use to Preserve and Share Disappearing Government Information” (2/21)

Fair Use Fair Dealing Week LogoJoin us for the free ACRL Presents webcast, “Using Fair Use to Preserve and Share Disappearing Government Information: A Guide for Rogue Librarians” on Tuesday, February 21, 2017, from 1:00 — 2:00 p.m. Central time (11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Pacific | 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Mountain | 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Central | 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. Eastern.  Convert additional time zones online.)

Fair use plays a crucial role as copyright’s safety valve for free expression because it permits unauthorized copying in service of the public good. This role, which enables everything from scathing reviews of artwork to wholesale digitization of books for accessibility, is taking on new currency as librarians scramble to preserve contested government information online. From deleted climate data, disappearing government web pages, and ephemeral political tweets, fair use cuts through the legal confusion so we can maintain the historical and scientific record. This webinar will introduce fair use as an equitable doctrine designed to support librarianship and prepare participants to apply fair use in their own communities’ work.

Learning outcomes:

  • Understand the fundamentals of fair use as an equitable doctrine that permits use of copyrighted materials for the public good.
  • Understand the copyright issues surrounding government information and the effects of sharing materials posted on different platforms such as .gov sites and social media platforms like Twitter.
  • Apply fair use in their own practice preserving and sharing digital government documents in their own communities.

Presenters: William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center in the North Carolina State University Libraries. He speaks and writes nationally on copyright, scholarly communication, and open culture. He is also a presenter for the ACRL workshop and a presenter for the ACRL workshop, Scholarly Communication: From Understanding to Engagement. Read more about Will in his ACRL member of the week profile.

Lillian Rigling is a North Carolina State University Libraries Fellow, working in the Copyright & Digital Scholarship Center and the User Experience Department. She coordinates outreach, instruction, and engagement around issues of author’s rights, copyright, and open culture at NCSU for students and faculty. Previously, she worked as a Graduate Assistant in the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office at the University of Toronto.

How to register:
Submit your free registration online by February 17, 2017.  Login details will be sent via email the afternoon of February 17.  The webcast will be recorded and made available shortly after the live event.

Questions should be directed to mconahan@ala.org.  More details about Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week, February 20-24, 2017, are available online.

ACRL Comments to NIH on Data Management, Sharing, and Citation

On January 19, 2017, ACRL provided comments to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Science Policy in response to their request for information on data management and sharing strategies and priorities. The NIH sought public comments in order to consider how digital scientific data generated from NIH-funded research should be managed, and to the fullest extent possible, made publicly available; and, how to set standards for citing shared data and software.

As reflected in previous ACRL support for governmental policies and legislation that facilitate open access and open education, ACRL is fundamentally committed to the open exchange of information to empower individuals and facilitate scientific discovery. In the information provided to NIH, ACRL shared its perspective on high priority data to be shared, the length of time these data should be made available for secondary research purposes, and important features of technical guidance for data and software citation. The ACRL comments concluded, ” scholarly data repositories, which are often within the remit of the University Library, deal with issues of data and software citation on a regular basis. We encourage NIH to reach out to members of this community who have developed practical expertise in these areas, and to consider librarians as active partners in their efforts to implement effective data and software citation. ACRL is happy to work with NIH as a bridge to the academic and research library community, helping to build effective collaborations and partnerships between communities.”

Read more in ACRL’s full comments to NIH.

Open Scholarship Early and Often: Register to Join Community Conversation on March 22 at ACRL 2017

Register before February 22, 2017, for the latest Association of Research Libraries (ARL)/Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Institute on Scholarly Communication event, “Open Scholarship Early and Often,” to be held March 22, 2017, in conjunction with the ACRL 2017 Conference. Registration for the conference is separate and not required to attend this event.

Don’t miss this opportunity to help drive a lively discussion with your colleagues about ways in which open infrastructure and open workflow tools can support the creation, preservation, and dissemination of open content.

Facilitators

  • Amy Buckland, Head, Research & Scholarship, University of Guelph
  • Rachel Frick, Executive Director, OCLC Research Library Partnership
  • Tara Robertson, Accessibility Librarian, Centre for Accessible Post-secondary Education Resources–British Columbia (CAPER-BC) at Langara College
  • Jeffrey Spies, Co-founder and Chief Technology Officer, Center for Open Science; Assistant Professor, Department of Engineering and Society, University of Virginia
  • Ana Van Gulick, Librarian, Carnegie Mellon University

Format
A little more structured than an unconference but a little less formal than a workshop, participants will engage in dialogues around a series of pre-defined topics and our expert facilitators will ensure that the conversation remains on track and productive.

Takeaways
As a result of participating in this conversation, attendees will:

  • Understand the value and potential of a thoughtful approach to workflow in order to provide more effective access and integrate with other scholarship
  • Understand the strategic importance of investing time and energy into local institutional policies and be better prepared to convey this value to others
  • Be aware of key elements needed to plan and coordinate resources for sustainable implementation of open infrastructure
  • Be better prepared to negotiate the political and cultural atmosphere around open scholarship
  • Be inspired to ensure there is a diversity of voices and the entire community is included in conversations about open scholarship, which supports a sustainable open infrastructure
  • Identify opportunities for collaboration, partnerships, and coordinated effort
  • Develop recommendations for local use at home campuses (on tools to use, conversations to have, how to build trust)

Event Details and Registration
Date: Wednesday, March 22, 2017
Time: 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
Location: Baltimore (Maryland) Convention Center
Fee: $100. Registration fee includes morning refreshment and afternoon break. Lunch is on your own.

Registration: Register online by Wednesday, February 22, 2017. Registration for the ACRL 2017 Conference is separate from this event (and not required).

About the Association of Research Libraries
The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is a nonprofit organization of 124 research libraries in the US and Canada. ARL’s mission is to influence the changing environment of scholarly communication and the public policies that affect research libraries and the diverse communities they serve. ARL pursues this mission by advancing the goals of its member research libraries, providing leadership in public and information policy to the scholarly and higher education communities, fostering the exchange of ideas and expertise, facilitating the emergence of new roles for research libraries, and shaping a future environment that leverages its interests with those of allied organizations. ARL is on the web at ARL.org, Facebook at facebook.com/association.of.research.libraries, and Twitter at @ARLnews.

About the Association of College & Research Libraries
The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) is the higher education association for librarians. Representing nearly 11,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals, ACRL (a division of the American Library Association) develops programs, products, and services to help academic and research librarians learn, innovate, and lead within the academic community. Founded in 1940, ACRL is committed to advancing learning and transforming scholarship. ACRL is on the web at acrl.org, Facebook at facebook.com/ala.acrl, and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

About the Institute on Scholarly Communication
The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) jointly sponsor the Institute on Scholarly Communication (ISC) to promote the development of library-led outreach on scholarly communication issues. The institute has hundreds of alumni from numerous events forming a community that provides peer support and professional sharing of information relating to campus outreach.

1 2 3 38