Category Archives: Scholarly Communication

ACRL e-Learning webcast series: Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy

Registration is available for the three-part e-Learning webcast series, From Awareness to Transformation: Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy in 21st Century Academic Libraries. This webcast series, organized by the ACRL Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy task force, will focus on practical approaches to building and strengthening connections between scholarly communication and information literacy in academic libraries.  These webcasts build on the work introduced in the ACRL white paper, Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy: Creating Strategic Collaborations for a Changing Academic Environment.

  • Webcast 1: Creating Strategic Collaborations – Starting the Conversations, Making the Connections, Taking Advantage of Opportunities (December 10, 2014)
  • Webcast 2: Designing Job Descriptions for New Roles: Integrating Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy into Library Liaison Job Descriptions (January 15, 2015)
  • Webcast 3: Is Copyright the Third Rail in Information Literacy, or a Common Denominator? (February 18, 2015)

These webcasts will provide content of use to a broad audience, from library staff who might have just begun these conversations to those who have already successfully addressing facets of the changing scholarly communication and information literacy landscape. Each webcast is related to the others but is also independent so you can do all three or just choose one or two that best meets your needs.

Complete details including webcast descriptions and learning outcomes for each webcast, and registration materials are available online. Contact Margot Conahan at mconahan@ala.org or call (312) 280-2522 with questions.

ACRL offering OER workshop at ALA Midwinter

Join ACRL for the workshop, “Tackling Textbook Costs through Open Educational Resources: A Primer,” on Thursday, January 29 (1:00 – 5:00 p.m.) and Friday, January 30, 2015 (8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.) prior to the ALA Midwinter Meeting in Chicago. This event is organized by SPARC in collaboration with the ARL/ACRL Institute for Scholarly Communication.

The skyrocketing cost of textbooks is a hot topic on campus, and academic libraries have a burgeoning opportunity to advance the solution through Open Educational Resources (OERs). OERs include digital textbooks and other academic materials that carry an open license permitting their free use and repurposing by others. Join us for this action-packed primer on how libraries can leverage OER for textbook affordability-and beyond. Participants will learn from national experts, get inspired by successful projects, brainstorm with peers, and develop action plans. All levels of experience welcome.

Learning Outcomes

  • Learn the basics of OER and how to talk about it on campus.
  • Learn how academic libraries are successfully advancing OER.
  • Begin developing an action plan for your campus.

Presenter(s)
Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education, SPARC. Additional presenters to be confirmed shortly.

How to register
Complete details and registration materials are online at http://www.ala.org/acrl/oerinstituteACRL and SPARC members, please enter the discount code “ACRL2015″ on the registration form in order to receive the discounted rate.

Questions should be directed to mconahan@ala.org.

Celebrate University Press Week

The Association of American University Presses (AAUP) and its more than 130 members will be celebrating the 3rd annual University Press Week from November 9 through 14. University Press Week showcases the unique role AAUP members play in producing high-quality works.

AAUP invites college and research libraries to join in celebrating this scholarship. This year the event will highlight vital collaborative projects spearheaded by university and academic presses with research libraries, scholars, and other universities around the world. The Press-Library Collaboration Report shares conclusions from a 2014 survey.

AAUP’s members will be showcasing examples of projects that highlight the success of collaboration in scholarly publishing, including projects with libraries, in its Collaboration Gallery. The focus on collaboration will culminate in an online discussion on Google+ moderated by Jennifer Howard from The Chronicle of Higher Education. Howard will be joined by Barbara Kline Pope, Executive Director for the National Academies Press and AAUP President, Peter Dougherty, Director of Princeton University Press, and Ron Chrisman, Director of the University of North Texas Press as these three press directors discuss three innovative collaborations that cross the boundaries of nations, institutions, and disciplines. Thirty-two members will also participate in a blog tour beginning Monday, November 10 that will continue throughout the week. Blog tour details are available on the AAUP website.

To help ACRL members participate in the celebration and promote the critical scholarship produced and distributed at our campuses, AAUP has made promotional materials available through a University Press Week toolkit.

- Faye A. Chadwell, Donald and Delpha Campbell University Librarian and OSU Press Director, Oregon State University

ALA and ACRL respond to Eleventh Circuit Court’s encouraging “fair use” decision in Georgia State University case

WASHINGTON, D.C.–On Friday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit handed down an important decision in Cambridge University Press et al. v. Carl V. Patton et al. concerning the permissible “fair use” of copyrighted works in electronic reserves for academic courses. Although publisher’s sought to bar the uncompensated excerpting of copyrighted material for “e-reserves,” the court rejected all such arguments and provided new guidance in the Eleventh Circuit for how “fair use” determinations by educators and librarians should best be made. Remanding to the lower court for further proceedings, the court ruled that fair use decisions should be based on a flexible, case-by-case analysis of the four factors of fair use rather than rigid “checklists” or “percentage-based” formulae.

Courtney Young, president of the American Library Association (ALA), responded to the ruling by issuing the following statement:

“The appellate court’s decision emphasizes what ALA, the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) and other library associations have always supported–thoughtful analysis of fair use and a rejection of highly restrictive fair use guidelines promoted by many publishers. Critically, this decision confirms the importance of flexible limitations on publisher’s rights, such as fair use. Additionally, the appeals court’s decision offers important guidance for reevaluating the lower courts’ ruling. The court agreed that the non-profit educational nature of the e-reserves service is inherently fair, and that that teachers’ and students’ needs should be the real measure of any limits on fair use, not any rigid mathematical model. Importantly, the court also acknowledged that educators’ use of copyrighted material would be unlikely to harm publishers financially when schools aren’t offered the chance to license excerpts of copyrighted work.

“Moving forward, educational institutions can continue to operate their e-reserve services because the appeals court rejected the publishers’ efforts to undermine those e-reserve services. Nonetheless, institutions inside and outside the appeals court’s jurisdiction–which includes George, Florida and Alabama–may wish to evaluate and ultimately fine tune their services to align with the appeals court’s guidance. In addition, institutions that employ checklists should ensure that the checklists are not applied mechanically.”

In 2008, publishers Cambridge, Oxford University Press, and SAGE Publishers sued Georgia State University for copyright infringement. The publishers argued that the university’s use of copyright-protected materials in course e-reserves without a license was a violation of the copyright law. Previously, in May 2012, Judge Orinda Evans of the U.S. District Court ruled in favor of the university in a lengthy 350-page decision that reviewed the 99 alleged infringements, finding all but five infringements to be fair uses.

About the American Library Association
The American Library Association is the oldest and largest library association in the world, with approximately 57,000 members in academic, public, school, government, and special libraries. The mission of the American Library Association is to provide leadership for the development, promotion and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.

About the Association of College & Research Libraries
The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) is the higher education association for librarians. Representing more than 11,500 academic and research librarians and interested individuals, ACRL (a division of the American Library Association) is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to help academic and research librarians learn, innovate and lead within the academic community. Founded in 1940, ACRL is committed to advancing learning and transforming scholarship. ACRL is on the Web at www.acrl.org/, Facebook at www.facebook.com/ala.acrl and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

ACRL Presents – Celebrating Open Access Week: Scholarly Communication Initiatives at Academic Libraries (10/23)

Join us for the free ACRL Presents webcast, “Celebrating Open Access Week: Scholarly Communication Initiatives at Academic Libraries,” on Thursday, October 23, from 1:00 — 2:00 p.m. Central time.  There are many ways that academic librarians are engaging with their communities around issues of open access and scholarly communication – collaborations with faculty, students and administration are key to understanding user perspectives and to building advocacy.  This webcast will present examples of scholarly communication and open access initiatives at a variety of academic libraries across the country.  Join us to learn how your colleagues are engaging with their communities around issues of author rights, open access, open educational resources, and more.

Learning outcomes:

  • Understand the variety of scholarly communication initiatives across a variety of institutional types and sizes
  • Hear about examples of collaboration and engagement with faculty and students
  • Learn about connections between scholarly communication, information literacy, collections and other services

Presenter: Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Scholarly Communications Librarian and Associate Professor, Illinois Wesleyan University

How to register
Submit your free registration online by October 22.  The webcast will be recorded and made available shortly after the live event.

Questions should be directed to mconahan@ala.org.  More details about Open Access Week, October 20-26, 2014, are available online.

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