Category Archives: Scholarly Communication

New Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy Professional Development

ACRL announces two new professional development offerings focusing on the Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy. Developed by curriculum designers Maryam Fakouri, ‎intellectual property librarian at Columbia College in Chicago, and John Watts, undergraduate learning librarian at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas, these programs will help build librarians’ capacity as leaders on issues and projects of campus-wide interest that involve scholarly communication, information literacy, and their connections (e.g., data literacy, intellectual property, open access, etc.).

ACRL e-Learning Webcast: April 7, 2016, 1:00 – 2:30 p.m. Central – Teaching at the Intersections: Aligning Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy in the One-Shot Library Instruction Session

With the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and the Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy white paper as its foundations, this interactive webcast will provide participants with ideas and skills to develop pedagogical strategies that engage undergraduate students on a range of scholarly communication issues within a one-shot instruction session. Recognize the value and utility of a variety of lenses for articulating the intersections of scholarly communications and information literacy in order to inform your professional practice as an educator. Complete webcast details and registration materials are available online.

ACRL Preconference @ ALA Annual Conference: June 24, 2016, 12:30 – 4:00 p.m. – Building a Curriculum on the Intersections of Scholarly Communications and Information Literacy

This half-day, hands-on preconference will provide participants with the skills and ideas to develop pedagogical strategies that reach students and faculty on a range of scholarly communication issues. Identify strategies for fostering dialog with colleagues and campus partners, identifying common interests and opportunities, and increasing awareness of complexities of the contemporary information environment. Scholarly communication librarians and information literacy librarians who are interested in partnering are encouraged to attend together. Complete preconference details and registration materials are available online.

Questions should be directed to Margot Conahan at mconahan@ala.org or 312-280-2522. Stay tuned for more information later this spring on how to bring a workshop on the intersections to your campus, chapter, or consortia.

 

ACRL Presents – Celebrating Fair Use Week, “The Fair Use Factors: Their History and Application” (2/25)

Fair Use Week LogoJoin us for the free ACRL Presents webcast, “The Fair Use Factors: Their History and Application,” on Thursday, February 25, 2016, from 1:00 — 2:00 p.m. Central time (11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Pacific | 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Mountain | 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Central | 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. Eastern.  Convert additional time zones online.)

The language of the fair use factors has changed very little since the nineteenth century, but the doctrine of fair use has changed a great deal. Understanding the history of the factors, particularly their changing importance, is crucial to making accurate fair use decisions today. This webcast will focus on fair use cases from the last forty years, tracing the relative importance of the four statutory factors and their subfactors. Participants will then be asked to practice applying current fair use law to a series of hypothetical fact patterns.

Learning outcomes:

  • Learn the history of fair use factors and subfactors including commerciality, publication status, and transformativeness.
  • Learn the current relative importance of the four fair use factors and their subfactors.
  • Use this knowledge of the fair use factors to make fair use decisions.

Presenter: Ana Enriquez is a copyright lawyer who focuses on the issues facing libraries, universities, and other cultural institutions. She has taught copyright and internet law in several contexts, including as the Head Teaching Fellow for the online course CopyrightX from 2013 to 2015. She is a member of the Illinois and Massachusetts bars and is a graduate of Berkeley Law and Harvard College.

How to register:
Submit your free registration online by February 24, 2016.  Login details will be sent via email the afternoon of February 24.  The webcast will be recorded and made available shortly after the live event.

Questions should be directed to mconahan@ala.org.  More details about Fair Use Week, February 22-26, 2016, are available online.

ACRL Scholarly Communication Workshop Hosts Announced

SC workshop blockThe ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee has selected five sites to host the workshop “Scholarly Communication: From Understanding to Engagement” as road show events in 2016. Recognizing that scholarly communication issues are central to the work of all academic librarians and all types of institutions, ACRL is underwriting the bulk of the costs of delivering this proven content by sending expert presenters on the road.

The institutions selected to host the 2016 road shows are:

  • Association of College & Research Libraries, Maryland Chapter, Baltimore, MD
  • College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA
  • Georgia College & State University, Milledgeville, GA
  • University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
  • University of Missouri, Columbia, MO

Led by two expert presenters, this structured interactive overview of the scholarly communication system supports individual or institutional strategic planning and action. The workshop focuses on access, emerging opportunities, intellectual property, and engagement. It is intended to provide a foundational understanding for participants and serve as a catalyst for action to help empower our community in accelerating the transformation of the scholarly communication system.

Host sites are partnering with other institutions and organizations in their area to extend the reach to as diverse an audience as possible. Library staff, including liaison librarians, catalogers, access services and senior management from two-year, liberal arts, master’s, comprehensive and doctoral institutions will attend the workshops.

In addition to offering a partial subsidy on a competitive basis to these five hosts, ACRL offers the option of bringing this one-day workshop, at full cost, to your campus, chapter, or consortia year round. Read more about how to bring this workshop to your region.

ALA, ACRL Submit Comments to Dept. of Ed on Open Licensing

Today, ALA and ACRL submitted joint comments applauding the U.S. Department of Education’s proposed rule for “Open Licensing Requirement for Direct Grant Programs” (proposed § 3474.20) which would amend regulations so that all Department grantees who are awarded direct competitive grant funds are required to openly license content to the public. We have long supported initiatives that seek to make federally funded research openly accessible to the public. Earlier this year, ACRL joined in a letter calling on the White House to open up access to federally funded educational resources. The Department’s proposed rule is an important step towards making curricular resources more readily accessible to our campus communities.

Speakers named for SPARC-ACRL Forum at ALA Midwinter Meeting

SPARC and ACRL once again offer their popular forum as part of the ALA Midwinter meeting. “Complying with Emerging Funder Public Access Policies: How Libraries Can Make It All Work” will be held Saturday, January 9, 2016, 3:00 – 4:30pm, at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, Room 253 C. Speakers have recently been named and are:

  • Jennifer Hansen, Officer, Knowledge & Research, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
  • Barbara Pralle, Manager of Data Management Services, Johns Hopkins University
  • Claire Stewart, Associate University Librarian for Research and Learning, University of Minnesota
  • Neil Thakur, Special Assistant to the Deputy Director for Extramural Research, National Institutes of Health

Over the past few years, there has been a proliferation of high-profile funders announcing policies requiring greater access to research articles and data. From the White House, to the Canadian Tri-Agency, to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, these policies are now moving into the implementation stage. This brings with it both the excitement of a new era, as well as the daunting challenge of determining how exactly to make things work. This challenge is compounded by differences in the requirements across policies, and the ability of individual researchers and institutions to make sense of these differences and comply effectively.

This forum will explore ways in which the library community can be instrumental in supporting the compliance efforts. Along with identifying some issues and possible strategies, the panelists will discuss services that are being, or have been created or expanded, to help address some of the issues that have been raised. We hope to provide you with some practical ideas that you will be able to take back and implement at your institution.

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