Category Archives: Publications

C&RL News – March 2016

C&RL News March 2016

The March 2016 issue C&RL News is now freely available online.

With the coming of spring, many libraries are beginning the hiring process for new staffing in earnest. In their article “Virtual vetting,” Christine Bombaro, Jessica L. Howard, and Anna Kozlowska provide advice for successful virtual interviews for both interviewees and search panels.

It is not too early to start planning outreach programs for the summer and fall. Librarians from Western Carolina University discuss their summer faculty program, based in part on the popular website Apartment Therapy. Jenny Erdmann and Patty H. Clark write about their experiences with student athletes as “Librarians in the huddle.”

Carrie Russell of the ALA Washington Office and Ed Sanchez of Marquette University discuss the impact of piracy on information policy and what librarians can do to take action in their article “Sci-Hub unmasked.”

This month’s Scholarly Communication column features a report of the June 2015 “ARL Library Liaison Institute. The institute brought together 50 liaison librarians to discuss and measure the impact of liaison work, including on the scholarly communication system.

We feature two related The Way I See It essays this issue. First, Elizabeth Choinski of the University of Mississippi writes about the difficulty of identifiying librarians’ academic rank when looking for outside reviewers in the promotion and tenure process. Paula Kaufman then discusses her efforts to create a database tracking information about past directors of ARL libraries.

This month we continue our look at the upcoming ALA/ACRL elections with responses from the candidates for ALA vice-president/president-elect to questions from the ACRL Board of Directors and a list of ACRL members running for ALA Council.

Make sure to check out the other features and departments this month, including the first round of profiles of 2016 ACRL award winners and Internet Resources on “Telemedicine” by Angela K. Gooden.

College & Research Libraries – March 2016

crl squareThe March 2016 issue of College & Research Libraries is now freely available online. The March issue features a selection of seven action research studies by teams who participated in the ACRL Assessment in Action: Academic Libraries and Student Success (AiA) program. More details on the special issue are available on the ACRL website.

Visit the C&RL website for complete contents from 1939 to the present and follow C&RL on Facebook and Twitter for updates and discussion.

Note: The November 2013 issue was the final print issue of College & Research Libraries. The journal began an online-only publication model in January 2014.

Editorial

Scott Walter. “Assessment in Action: Introduction to the Special Issue.”

Articles

Kara J. Malenfant, Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe, and Debra Gilchrist. “Assessment as Action Research: Bridging Academic Scholarship and Everyday Practice.”

Veronica Arellano Douglas and Celia E. Rabinowitz. “Examining the Relationship between Faculty-Librarian Collaboration and First-Year Students’ Information Literacy Abilities.” Abstract | Full Text (PDF).

Sara Davidson Squibb and Susan Mikkelsen. “Assessing the Value of Course-Embedded Information Literacy on Student Learning and Achievement.” Abstract | Full Text (PDF).

Jérôme Melançon and Nancy Goebel. “Personal Librarian for Aboriginal Students: A Programmatic Assessment.” Abstract | Full Text (PDF).

Phil Jones, Julia Bauder, and Kevin Engel. “Mixed or Complementary Messages: Making the Most of Unexpected Assessment Results.” Abstract | Full Text (PDF).

Kacy Lundstrom, Pamela Martin, and Dory Cochran. “Making Strategic Decisions: Conducting and Using Research on the Impact of Sequenced Library Instruction.” Abstract | Full Text (PDF).

Lisa Massengale, Pattie Piotrowski, and Devin Savage. “Identifying and Articulating Library Connections to Student Success.” Abstract | Full Text (PDF).

Brandy Whitlock and Nassim Ebrahimi. “Beyond the Library: Using Multiple, Mixed Measures Simultaneously in a College-Wide Assessment of Information Literacy.” Abstract | Full Text (PDF).

 

2014 Academic Library Trends and Statistics

14DocCoverACRL announces the publication of 2014 Academic Library Trends and Statistics, the latest in a series of annual publications that describe the collections, staffing, expenditures, and service activities of academic libraries in all Carnegie classifications. The three-volume set includes Associate of Arts institutions, Master’s Colleges and Universities/Baccalaureate Colleges and Research/Doctoral-granting Institutions. The individual volumes for Associates Colleges, Masters/Baccalaureate, and Doctoral-Granting institutions are also available for purchase.

The 2014 data show that library expenditures for collection materials averaged $6,471,262 for doctoral degree-granting institutions; $776,119 for comprehensive degree-granting institutions; $509,643 for baccalaureate schools; and $143,254 for associate-degree granting institutions. The percentage of the collection materials budget spent on ongoing resources purchases (including subscription expenditures) averaged 70% of the total materials budget. On average, doctoral degree granting institutions spent 74.6% of their materials budgets on ongoing purchases in 2013; comprehensive schools spent an average of 76.5%; baccalaureate schools spent an average 71.5%; and associate degree granting institutions spent an average of 55.6%.

The 2014 data show that expenditures for salaries and wages accounted for 57.3% of the total library expenditures on average. Salaries and wages constituted 77.9% of total library expenditures for associate-degree granting institutions, 52.7% for baccalaureate, 54.7% for comprehensive schools, and 44% for doctoral/research institutions.

Of the libraries surveyed, 34.3% of doctoral degree-granting institutions, 33.8% of comprehensive degree-granting institutions, 20.6% of baccalaureate schools, and 16.9% of associate-degree granting institutions require professional development for tenure track consideration or other advancement.  Less than half of academic libraries have measures or methods in place to assess the impact of professional development, but a small percentage of libraries require staff to report how their professional development activities support student learning or research outcomes at their institutions, with 10.46% of baccalaureate schools using this method. In the past three years, funding for professional development has increased for more doctoral/research institutions (30.8%) than comprehensive schools (19.9%), baccalaureate schools (19.3%), or associate-degree granting institutions (11.4%). Of the libraries surveyed, most budgeted between .01 – 1.99% for professional development including 49% of doctoral/research schools, 42.6% of comprehensive schools, 38% of baccalaureate schools, and 23.4% of associate degree granting institutions.

The 2014 survey includes data from 1,449 academic libraries in six major categories:

  • Collections (including titles held, volumes, and electronic books)
  • Expenditures (library materials, salaries and wages, etc.)
  • Personnel and Public Services (staff and services)
  • Ph.D.s Granted, Faculty, Student Enrollment
  • Professional development

The survey also provides analysis of selected variables and summary data (high, low, mean and median) for all elements. The 2014 data can be used for self-studies, budgeting, strategic planning, annual reports, grant applications, and benchmarking.

2014 Academic Library Trends and Statistics is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store, by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

The Craft of Librarian Instruction

Craft-coverACRL announces the publication of The Craft of Librarian Instruction: Using Acting Techniques to Create Your Teaching Presence by Julie Artman, Jeff Sundquist, and Douglas R. Dechow.

Library instruction is like a theatre performance. You play a role as the instruction librarian. There is a live audience. You may receive reviews or evaluations. Or maybe the teaching experience feels more like an audition—a bit unnerving. In The Craft of Librarian Instruction, join Artman, Sundquist, and Dechow for a fun and creative approach to library instruction as they demonstrate how acting techniques can hone your presentation skills, your teaching style, and your performance to create an invigorating (and stress-free) learning experience for your students.

Through the use of acting methods and techniques, readers will learn how to:

  • Rehearse and prepare for instruction sessions by centering yourself through visualization, memorization, and improvisation;
  • Connect with students through personalization and role-playing, and by exploring teacher identity; and
  • Sharpen a unique teaching presence through reflection and intentional instruction.

Vocal and physical preparation and instructional scenarios will reveal potential challenges and pose solutions, and provide tips for deepening your teaching skills. Intended for newly hired instruction librarians, librarians with little or no teaching experience, those dealing with shyness or ‘stage fright,’ as well as more experienced librarians in need of a refreshed perspective, The Craft of Librarian Instruction will add an undeniable star quality to your instructional performance.

The Craft of Librarian Instruction: Using Acting Techniques to Create Your Teaching Presence is available for purchase in print, as an e-book, and as a print/ e-book bundle through the ALA Online Store; in print and for Kindle through Amazon.com; and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

Encoding Space: Shaping Learning Environments that Unlock Human Potential

ENCODING SPACEACRL announces the publication of Encoding Space: Shaping Learning Environments that Unlock Human Potential.

Can we create library environments that inspire people to be more creative, collaborative, reflective, or engaged? That is the driving question of this imaginative new book authored by Brian Mathews of the Virginia Tech Libraries. Encoding Space weaves elements together from architecture, psychology, retail, neuroscience, and many other disciplines in this narrative about the evolution of library buildings. Re-conceptualizing libraries as showrooms, studios, salons, and boutiques, some new directions are outlined for discussion about the future. Mathews encourages you and your team to look beyond the functional value of your facility, and to consider how libraries can also serve as an experimental landscape that helps foster well-being and personal growth.

Featuring drawings and renderings from interior designer Leigh Ann Soistmann, Encoding Space is ideal for librarians and campus administrators looking to spark their creative thinking and push strategic conversations about the purpose, value, and future of library buildings.

Encoding Space: Shaping Learning Environments that Unlock Human Potential is available for purchase in print through the ALA Online Store and Amazon.com; and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

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