Category Archives: Publications

ALA JobLIST Launches Next Generation LIS Career Center Powered by YourMembership

joblistALA JobLIST, the online career center for job seekers and employers in library and information science and technology, this week announced the launch of an all-new version of the site. A joint project of the American Library Association’s (ALA) American Libraries magazine, the Association of College and Research Libraries’ (ACRL) C&RL News magazine, and ALA’s Office for Human Resource Development and Recruitment (HRDR), the enhanced ALA JobLIST site is now positioned to serve users better through an updated service powered by YourMembership, the leading provider of job websites and career centers for organizations that serve specialized members.

“ALA and ACRL members represent some of the most engaged and qualified professionals in the field, making them highly appealing to employers, whether in libraries or other industries,” said ACRL Classified Ads Coordinator David Connolly. “ALA JobLIST the busiest it’s been since it launched in 2006. We expect that YourMembership’s expertise in job board technology and user experience quality is going to help connect job seekers with the right hiring employers more easily and effectively than ever before.”

In addition to serving as a robust source of hundreds of current LIS job opportunities, the improved ALA JobLIST offers a number of enhanced, user-centered benefits to both job seekers and employers, including:

  • Job seeker account integration with their ALA web services login; job seekers will use their ala.org username and password to access their ALA JobLIST accounts, instead of having to keep track of different logins.
  • The ability for job seekers to post their résumés anonymously, allowing them to be recruited while remaining in complete control over how employers view their information.
  • A mobile-responsive environment to ensure that job seekers have an optimal experience regardless of their device.
  • The ability for LIS job seekers to be alerted every time a new job becomes available that matches their personal goals and interests.
  • Extensive employment brand advertising opportunities for employers.
  • Simplified flat-rate pricing and a variety of new options for employers to expose job opportunities to librarians and information professionals who are not actively looking for a new position, including Jobs Flash emails to ALA/ACRL members and other interested parties.
  • Integration of job content into social media channels to provide valuable exposure of job openings and engage ALA and ACRL’s extensive social media audiences along with other Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn users.
  • Options for job seekers and employers to gain exposure throughout YourMembership’s network of nearly 2,500 niche career centers, including diversity-focused boards.

“We’re proud to help take the ALA JobLIST, a critical industry resource for library and information science & technology professionals nationwide, to the next level of effectiveness in connecting well qualified candidates and employers,” said YourMembership Senior Vice President and General Manager, Revenue Solutions Tristan Jordan. “Employers will now have access to more candidates, and job seekers will find more job opportunities, more efficiently, regardless of the devices they use to conduct their searches.”

ALA JobLIST is located at http://joblist.ala.org.

C&RL News – December 2015

The December 2015 issue of C&RL News is now freely available online.

C&RL News December 2015

With the increasing popularity of institutional open access policies, along with access to institutional repositories and other self-archiving sites, comes renewed focus on copyright issues. In this month’s Scholarly Communication column, Nancy Sims of the University of Minnesota unpacks copyright law for versions of scholarly works in her article “It’s all the same to me!”

While the fall term is just coming to an end, it’s never too early to start planning for recruitment and orientation activities. Elizabeth McMunn-Tetangco discusses the University of California-Merced’s adoption of a Buzzfeed style quiz to educate prospective new students about library services. Read about the program in “Where (in the library) do you belong?” Kylie Bailin recounts Lafayette College’s experiment with drawing inspiration from a popular movie series to jazz up their first year library orientation, along with lessons they learned from the future, in “From ‘The Research Games’ to tours.”

In this issue’s The Way I See It essay, Cynthia A. Romanowski writes about overcoming her tenure track and process fears after moving into a new position in her essay “First-time faculty librarian, first year experience.”

According to tradition, we also take a look back at ACRL’s accomplishments in advancing learning and transforming scholarship over the past fiscal year with our Annual Report. The report demonstrates the progress the association has made in achieving the goals of the Plan for Excellence along with other programs and services.

Help make the next year of your association as successful as the last by volunteering to serve on an ACRL committee. The call for volunteers is also available in this issue.

Make sure to check out the other features and departments this month, including Internet Resources on ornithology by Adrienne Warner and a preview of ACRL events at the upcoming 2016 ALA Midwinter Meeting in Boston.

Thanks as always for reading the News, and we’ll see you in 2016.

New ACRL Book Examines “Modern Pathfinders”

Modern PathfindersACRL announces the publication of Modern Pathfinders: Creating Better Research Guides by Jason Puckett.

Whether you call them research guides, subject guides or pathfinders, web-based guides are a great way to create customized support tools for a specific audience – a class, a group, or anyone engaging in research. Studies show that library guides are often difficult, confusing, or overwhelming, causing users to give up and just fall back on search engines such as Google. How can librarians create more effective, less confusing, and simply better research guides?

In Modern Pathfinders, Puckett takes proven ideas from instructional design and user experience web design and combines them into easy-to-understand principles for making your research guides better teaching tools. It doesn’t matter what software your library uses, the advice and techniques in this book will help you create guides that are easier for your users to understand and more effective to use.

Puckett is also the author of the ACRL publication Zotero: A Guide for Librarians, Researchers, and Educators.

Modern Pathfinders: Creating Better Research Guides is available for purchase in print, as an e-book, and as a print/ e-book bundle through the ALA Online Store; in print and for Kindle through Amazon.com; and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

College & Research Libraries – November 2015

crl squareThe November 2015 issue of College & Research Libraries is now freely available online. Visit the C&RL website for complete contents from 1939 to the present and follow C&RL on Facebook and Twitter for updates and discussion.

Note: The November 2013 issue was the final print issue of College & Research Libraries. The journal began an online-only publication model in January 2014.

Editorial

Scott Walter and R. David Lankes. “The Innovation Agenda.”

Articles

Madeline Kelly. “Citation Patterns of Engineering, Statistics, and Computer Science Researchers: An Internal and External Citation Analysis across Multiple Engineering Subfields.” Abstract | Full Text (PDF).

Helen Georgas. “The Case of the Disappearing E-Book: Academic Libraries and Subscription Packages.” Abstract | Full Text (PDF).

Mariana Regalado and Maura A. Smale. “‘I Am More Productive in the Library Because It’s Quiet’: Commuter Students in the College Library.” Abstract | Full Text (PDF).

Mandi Goodsett and Andrew Walsh. “Building a Strong Foundation: Mentoring Programs for Novice Tenure-Track Librarians in Academic Libraries.” Abstract | Full Text (PDF).

Qinqin Zhang, Maren Goodman, and Shiyi Xie. “Integrating Library Instruction into the Course Management System for a First-Year Engineering Class: An Evidence-Based Study Measuring the Effectiveness of Blended Learning on Students’ Information Literacy Levels.” Abstract | Full Text (PDF).

Krisellen Maloney and Jan H. Kemp. “Changes in Reference Question Complexity Following the Implementation of a Proactive Chat System: Implications for Practice.” Abstract | Full Text (PDF).

Merinda Kaye Hensley, Sarah L. Shreeves, and Stephanie Davis-Kahl. “A Survey of Campus Coordinators of Undergraduate Research Programs.” Abstract | Full Text (PDF).

Book Reviews
Bradford Lee Eden. Joan Giesecke, Jon Cawthorne, and Deb Pearson. Navigating the Future with Scenario Planning: A Guidebook for Librarians. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries, 2015. 118p. Paper, $36.00 (ISBN 978-083898751-3). Full Text (PDF).

Mark E. Shelton. Joseph R. Matthews. Library Assessment in Higher Education. 2nd ed. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Libraries Unlimited, 2014. 226p. Paper, $55.00 (ISBN 13: 978-1-61069-817-7). Full Text (PDF).

Phill Johnson. The Librarian Stereotype: Deconstructing Perceptions and Presentations of Information Work. Eds. Nicole Pagowsky and Miriam Rigby for the Association of College and Research Libraries. Chicago: American Library Association, 2014. 312p. Paper, $60.00 (ISBN 978-0-8389-8704-9). Full Text (PDF).

Mark E. Shelton. Library Analytics and Metrics: Using Data to Drive Decisions and Services. Ed. Ben Showers. London, UK: Facet Publishing, 2015. 176p. Paper, $95.00 (ISBN: 978-1-85604-965-8). Full Text (PDF).

Kelli Johnson. Not Just Where to Click: Teaching Students How to Think about Information (Publications in Librarianship No. 68). Eds. Troy A. Swanson and Heather Jagman. Chicago: American Library Association, 2015. 440p. $88.00 (ISBN 978-0-8389-8716-2). Full Text (PDF).

Choice Debuts Content, Tools Tailored for Community College Market

Choicechoice_logo-80H, the premier review journal for new English-language books and digital resources for academic libraries, premieres content specifically crafted for community college libraries in the November 2015 issue of Choice magazine and on Choice Reviews Online.

“With two-year colleges currently constituting about 39% of all colleges, the role of the community college library is more important than ever. Today, much of the work there revolves around three main challenges: helping students learn, improving academic and program performance, and promoting innovation,” said Mark Cummings, editor and publisher of Choice. “By expanding its attention to instructional resources most appropriate for community colleges, Choice can help community college libraries meet these challenges.”

With that in mind, Choice’s new community college features include:

  • All titles appropriate for community college libraries are marked with an easily identifiable iconchoicecc.
  • The top community college titles each month are listed in a special multipage section at the front of the magazine and in Choice Reviews Online.
  • Editorials addressing topics especially relevant to community colleges will appear in selected issues. Prospective topics include collection development, inclusiveness, leadership, workforce development, educational technologies, college readiness, information access, OERs, and more.

An editorial by Zoe Fisher, reference and instruction librarian at Pierce College in Puyallup, Washington, and a Choice Editorial Board member, inaugurates Choice’s new targeted content with her editorial, “Hey, That’s My Librarian!: Perspectives on Student Engagement from a Community College Librarian.” As she notes in her column, “Librarians, particularly community college librarians, are uniquely situated to be mentors to adult learners. This is the advantage of doing it all —we teach, we coordinate, we advise, and we make new connections with students every day.”

Choice looks forward to providing the tools to help community college libraries continue to “do it all,” now and in the future.

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