Category Archives: Publications

C&RL News – January 2017

C&RL News cover January 2017The January 2017 issue of C&RL News is now freely available online. The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education continues to be a major topic of discussion in the academic library community. In this issue’s Perspectives on the Framework column, Troy Swanson of the Moraine Valley Community College discusses his efforts in “Sharing the ACRL Framework with faculty.” Also, visit this month’s News from the Field department for information on the launch of the exciting new ACRL Framework Sandbox.

Experimenting with social media and related technologies for marketing and instruction continue to be a focus for many libraries. In this month’s ACRL TechConnect feature, Elizabeth Price and Rebecca Richardson of Murray State University write about their library’s experiences with Yik Yak in their article “Eavesdropping on the user experience.”

Emily Ford of Portland State University shares her experiences and evolving thinking on digital badging in instruction in her The Way I See It essay “To badge or not to badge?”

With the ACRL 2017 early-bird registration deadline fast approaching, the Baltimore conference is also a trending topic. Sara Arnold-Garza and Joanna Gadsby provide a fascinating history of “Social justice and Baltimore” in our look at the conference’s host city.

Strategic planning is another important, but sometimes dreaded, process for most academic libraries. Aaron L. Brenner, Robin Kear, and Eve Wilder provide a look at ways the University of Pittsburgh Libraries went about “Reinvigorating strategic planning” by introducing more collaborative processes.

The Johns Hopkins Libraries open access promotion fund” is the focus of this month’s Scholarly Communication column by Robin N. Sinn, Sue M. Woodson, and Mark Cyzyk.

Make sure to check out the rest of our features and departments, including Internet Resources on “United Nations” statistical and data resources by Lisa DeLuca of Seton Hall University, and a look at the contents of the January issue of College & Research Libraries, with a focus on library activism, in the C&RL Spotlight department.

2015 Academic Library Trends and Statistics

2015 Academic Library Trends and StatisticsACRL announces the publication of 2015 Academic Library Trends and Statistics, the latest in a series of annual publications that describe the collections, staffing, expenditures and service activities of academic libraries in all Carnegie classifications. The one-volume title includes data from Associate of Arts Colleges, Baccalaureate, Master’s Colleges and Universities/ and Research/Doctoral-granting Institutions. Those who purchase the print edition will receive a complimentary one-year subscription to the 2015 survey data available through ACRL Metrics, an online subscription service that provides access to the ACRL survey data from 1999-2015.

The 2015 data show that library expenditures for collection materials averaged $5,700,113 for doctoral degree-granting institutions; $725,826 for comprehensive degree-granting institutions; $524,184 for baccalaureate schools and $146,542 for associate-degree granting institutions. On average, doctoral degree granting institutions spent 76.7% of their materials budgets on ongoing commitments to subscriptions in 2015; comprehensive schools spent an average of 76.8%; baccalaureate schools spent an average 72.4% and associate degree granting institutions spent an average of 55.5%. On average, academic libraries spent 70.4% of their materials budget on subscriptions.

The 2015 data show that expenditures for salaries and wages accounted for 63.4% of the total library expenditures on average. Salaries and wages constituted 77.9% of total library expenditures for associate-degree granting institutions, 45.4% for baccalaureates, 87% for comprehensive schools, and 43.3% for doctoral/research institutions.

Of the libraries surveyed, 57.5% of doctoral degree-granting institutions, 34.5% of comprehensive degree-granting institutions, 38.5% of baccalaureate schools, and 19.9% of associate-degree granting institutions are developing or considering developing a shared print collection with a group of libraries or consortium partners to avoid duplication of titles between partner libraries.  More libraries are participating in open education initiatives by providing open access text books, teaching resources, courseware, and books, including 24% of associate degree granting institutions, 21.2% of baccalaureate schools, 22.4% of comprehensive schools, and 40.5% of doctoral/research libraries.

In the past five years, collection budgets have shifted from traditional collection development to patron-driven (PDA) or demand-driven acquisitions (DDA) with the largest shifts taking place in research/doctoral universities. Currently only 27.5% of research/doctoral institutions, 48.6% of comprehensive schools, 55.2% of baccalaureate schools, and 67.7% of associate degree granting schools still use a traditional collection development model.

The 2015 survey includes data from 1,499 academic libraries in five major categories:

  • Collections (including titles held, volumes, and electronic books)
  • Expenditures (library materials, salaries and wages, etc.)
  • Library Services
  • Staffing
  • Collection development trends (including shifts in formats, open education initiatives, institutional repositories, support for digitization, shared print collections, and more)

The survey also provides analysis of selected variables and summary data (high, low, mean and median) for all elements. The 2015 data can be used for self-studies, budgeting, strategic planning, annual reports, grant applications and benchmarking.

2015 Academic Library Trends and Statistics is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store, by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

RBM: A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage – Fall 2016

rbm_17_2The Fall 2016 issue of RBM: A Journal of Rare Books, Manuscripts, and Cultural Heritage is now freely available online. Visit the RBM website for complete contents of RBM and its preceeding title Rare Books & Manuscripts Librarianship from 1986 to the present. RBM became an open access journal in Spring 2016.

Editor’s Note

Jennifer K. Sheehan. “Editor’s Note.”

Research Articles

Anne Garner, Johanna Goldberg, and Rebecca Pou. “Collaborative Social Media Campaigns and Special Collections: A Case Study on #ColorOurCollections.”

Jacob Gordon. “In the Flesh? Anthropodermic Bibliopegy Verification and Its Implications.”

Laila Hussein Moustafa. “From Peshawar to Kabul: Preserving Afghanistan’s Cultural Heritage during Wartime.”

Silvia Vong. “A Constructivist Approach for Introducing Undergraduate Students to Special Collections and Archival Research.”

Book Reviews

Libby Hertenstein. A Great Library Easily Begets Affection: Memories of the William L. Clements Library 1923–2015. Brian Leigh Dunnigan, Cheney J. Schopieray, Emiko Hastings, and J. Kevin Gaffagnino, eds. Ann Arbor: William L. Clements Library University of Michigan Press, 2015. 169p. ISBN 978-1881606017.

Simran Thadani. Wolfgang Ernst. Stirrings in the Archives: Order from Disorder. Translated by Adam Siegel. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 2015. vi, 102p. $75. ISBN 9781442253957.

Rewired: Research-Writing Partnerships within the Frameworks

Threshold full coverACRL announces the publication of Rewired: Research-Writing Partnerships within the Frameworks, edited by Randall McClure. College and research librarians have been working alongside professors invested in writing in the disciplines for decades, but new kinds of partnerships are emerging as faculty members and librarians are re-imagining their work for students in a world where writing is both global and largely digital.

Rewired highlights the clear connections between two important disciplinary documents—the Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing (CWPA, NCTE, and NWP, 2011) and the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (ACRL, 2016)—and examines partnerships between librarians and their colleagues who are teaching information literacy in new and impactful ways.

The chapters in Section 1, Developing a Shared Understanding, show off the ways we can learn from each other’s expertise when we engage in conversation and break down the disciplinary silos that tend to separate us. The range of curricular reforms at institutions across the country showcased in Section 2, Partnering Research & Writing, offer multiple options for how partnerships between faculty members invested in writing in the disciplines and their librarian colleagues might develop in different kinds of institutional contexts. And finally, Section 3, Assessing Writing & Information Literacy, challenges us to think about how we assess students’ research-writing development and the impact of the partnerships we develop.

From disciplines and areas one would expect—English departments, first-year writing programs, and university writing centers—to those perhaps more unexpected, such as the health sciences, courses in music, and summer bridge programs, Rewired features partnerships within a range of institutional types that have built upon the connections between these Frameworks in ways that construct meaningful relationships for students as they develop expertise in research-writing.

Rewired: Research-Writing Partnerships within the Frameworks is available for purchase in print and as an ebook through the ALA Online Store; in print through Amazon.com; and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

Choice Launches Academic Publishing Weekly

snipimageLaunching November 11 and created specifically for the academic publisher market, the latest newsletter from Choice is Academic Publishing Weekly. Choice, a publishing unit of ACRL (a division of the American Library Association), has been the go-to resource for academic librarians for more than 50 years. As a trusted tool for collection development, Choice has been an important ally to academic publishers and this newsletter is a natural extension of the Choice brand.

Academic Publishing Weekly is curated by the editors of Choice. From mergers and acquisitions to research reports, major product launches and significant “people on the move” items, the newsletter aggregates the latest updates from around the industry in a convenient, single-source format, emailed to opt-in subscribers.

  • Frequency: Weekly
  • Distribution: Over 900 executives at large and small academic and university presses
  • For information on advertising: contact Pam Marino, pmarino@ala-choice.org, 860-347-6933 x128
  • Sign up to receive Academic Publishing Weekly

“Choice is excited to add this newsletter to its growing stable of products,” says Bill Mickey, Choice editorial director. “We’ve long kept our subscribers up-to-date on Choice-reviewed titles and now we’re pleased to offer a smartly curated source of industry news for the publishers we’ve been working with for more than 50 years.”

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