Category Archives: Publications

The Self as Subject: Autoethnographic Research into Identity, Culture, and Academic Librarianship

ACRL announces the publication of The Self as Subject: Autoethnographic Research into Identity, Culture, and Academic Librarianship, edited by Anne-Marie Deitering, Robert Schroeder, and Richard Stoddart. This collection of reflective narratives explores the varied dimensions of librarianship in the present moment, and examines autoethnography’s potential to help librarians answer questions that cannot be answered by traditional, empirical research methods and to reveal voices that are obscured by aggregations of data.

Autoethnography is a type of research that uses writing and self-examination to explore far-ranging cultural, political, and social issues through personal experience. It is a qualitative, reflexive, ethnographic method where the researcher is also the subject of inquiry.

Using autoethnography as their research method, the 21 academic librarian authors of The Self as Subject investigate aspects of what it means to be a librarian. Starting with a reflective examination of themselves, they each investigate questions of culture, values, and identity. All of the pieces in this volume share some characteristics: Each one is the result of a rigorous examination of the self and lived experience, and each one moves between the subjective and the cultural in its analysis. How the authors do this, however, varies widely—from a graphic novel to speculative fiction to rigorous academic analysis.

The Self as Subject provides an opportunity to expand our understanding of rigor and the practice of research in LIS, and explores what it means to be a librarian in this age of disruptive change, and how the various identities and experiences we bring to our practice shape our experience of librarianship. This book is for any librarian interested in research and research methods; the use of literary genres in research; alternatives to large empirical studies; questions of identity and social justice; and those looking to step out of their comfort zone and approach learning from a new and challenging vantage point. As Barbara Fister writes in the foreword, “this collection is something rare and important for the discipline of librarianship.”

The Self as Subject: Autoethnographic Research into Identity, Culture, and Academic Librarianship is available for purchase in print and as an ebook through the ALA Online Store; in print through Amazon.com; and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

Zotero: A Guide for Librarians, Researchers and Educators, Second Edition

Zotero book coverACRL announces the publication of Zotero: A Guide for Librarians, Researchers and Educators, Second Edition by Jason Puckett. Functioning as a thorough introduction to Zotero—from setting up to saving, organizing, and citing items, and ending with more advanced topics—as well as a guide to teaching Zotero, this is both a user’s guide to the tool and a handbook for understanding how different groups use it.

2011’s Zotero: A Guide for Librarians, Researchers and Educators was the first book-length treatment of this powerful research tool, and this completely revised and updated second edition is still the perfect guidebook to this robust, open access research tool that allows the user to manage all aspects of bibliographic data. In addition to functioning as a user’s and teacher’s guide, the book looks at strategies for developing effective support structures and channels within an institution and building the right linkages between relevant players, in particular library support staff and IT.

As Sebastian Karcher, associate director of the Qualitative Data Repository at Syracuse University and leading specialist on the Zotero reference management software and the Citation Style Language, says in his Foreword to the book, “In this second edition of Zotero, Jason has significantly updated and improved on his 2011 edition, drawing on his rich experience supporting, teaching, and “evangelizing” Zotero…[a] successful teacher will find this guide to understanding not just Zotero but also its users indispensable.”

This second edition, in full color, includes many more figures, screenshots, and illustrations, revised bibliographies, substantial changes to the chapter on online tools, and the addition of a completely new chapter on add-ons and mobile applications. Zotero is a comprehensive guide for researchers who just need a how-to to help them make bibliographies; instruction librarians and teachers using Zotero in conjunction with classes doing research assignments; and reference librarians and tech support staff who are helping users with Zotero questions and problems.

Zotero: A Guide for Librarians, Researchers and Educators, Second Edition is available for purchase in print and as an ebook through the ALA Online Store and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

Creative Instructional Design: Practical Applications for Librarians

ACRL announces the publication of Creative Instructional Design: Practical Applications for Librarians, edited by Brandon K. West, Kimberly D. Hoffman, and Michelle Costello. This is a comprehensive exploration of why instructional design is so impactful for academic librarians—intentionality, collaboration, and engagement—and provides extensive examples of how librarians are using instructional design to craft and assess new and innovative services, teach information literacy, develop online content, and design programs and outreach initiatives in a targeted and mindful way.

With the explosion of accessible information online and students feeling more and more independent in their searching skills and information needs, libraries are shifting to user-centered models. These changes are requiring librarians to define the library by the services it can provide, especially innovative ones, such as publishing services, scholarly communications, and project management. Regardless of the instructional format, from classes to workshops to videos to worksheets, instructional design strives to ensure that potential learning gains by students are maximized and that the instruction is evaluated for improvement in future iterations.

Creative Instructional Design examines ways in which librarians are using instructional design principles to inform, construct, or evaluate information literacy initiatives; online library instruction and services; and programming and outreach efforts, and provides ways for instructors, trainers, and educators to both approach instruction creation systematically, and evaluate how it has been effective and how it can be improved.

Creative Instructional Design: Practical Applications for Librarians is available for purchase in print and as an ebook through the ALA Online Store and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

New ACRL Publication: 2016 Academic Library Trends and Statistics

2016 Academic Library Trends and StatisticsACRL announces the publication of 2016 Academic Library Trends and Statistics, the latest in a series of annual publications that describe the collections, staffing, expenditures and service activities of academic libraries in all Carnegie classifications. The one-volume title includes data from Associate of Arts Colleges, Baccalaureate Colleges, Master’s Colleges and Universities, and Research/Doctoral-granting Institutions. Those who purchase the print edition will receive a complimentary one-year subscription to the 2016 survey data available through ACRL Metrics, an online subscription service that provides access to the ACRL survey data from 1999-2016.

The 2015 data show that library expenditures for collection materials averaged $5,623,980 for doctoral degree-granting institutions; $701,778 for comprehensive degree-granting institutions; $493,206 for baccalaureate schools and $148,822 for associate-degree granting institutions. On average, doctoral degree granting institutions spent 70.9% of their materials budgets on ongoing commitments to subscriptions in 2016; comprehensive schools spent an average of 79.2%; baccalaureate schools spent an average 74.2% and associate degree granting institutions spent an average of 55.2%. On average, academic libraries spent 69.8% of their materials budget on subscriptions.

The 2016 data show that expenditures for salaries and wages accounted for 57.2% of the total library expenditures on average. Salaries and wages constituted 76.5% of total library expenditures for associate-degree granting institutions, 52.3% for baccalaureates, 55.7% for comprehensive schools, and 44.5% for doctoral/research institutions.

In the past five years, 21% of all academic libraries saw increases for staffing while 19% saw decreased funding and 60% reported flat budgets. During the same time period, almost 61% of academic libraries re-purposed and/or cross-trained staff to better support new technologies or services in the libraries or provide support new positions or departments in the library.  Retirements and budget constriction were also factors influencing the need for re-purposing and cross-training. The top five systems/projects currently supported by academic libraries include web development, open access/institutional repositories, learning systems, digital humanities, and digital media production.

Academic libraries also provide specialized assistance in these top six areas: copyright, metadata, data management, research impact, instructional design, and data visualization. In the past five years more than 58% of all academic libraries surveyed have their reference staffing models, with the most popular change being a switch to on-call staffing. Libraries are providing staff and other forms of support to many campus services including writing centers (42%), tutoring (39%), testing (25%), diversity and equity (12%), and digital scholarship labs (11%).

The 2016 survey includes data from 1,525 academic libraries in five major categories:

  • Collections (including titles held, volumes, and electronic books)
  • Expenditures (library materials, salaries and wages, etc.)
  • Library services
  • Staffing
  • Staffing trends (including budget shifts, specialized assistance, cross-training, reference staffing, information literacy services, support for campus units)

The survey also provides analysis of selected variables and summary data (high, low, mean and median) for all elements. The 2016 data can be used for self-studies, budgeting, strategic planning, annual reports, grant applications, and benchmarking.

2016 Academic Library Trends and Statistics is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store, by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

College & Research Libraries – July 2017

C&RL - July 2017 coverThe July 2017 issue of College & Research Libraries is now freely available online. Visit the C&RL website for complete contents from 1939 to the present and follow C&RL on Facebook and Twitter for updates and discussion.

Note: The November 2013 issue was the final print issue of College & Research Libraries. The journal began an online-only publication model in January 2014.

Editorial

Wendi Arant Kaspar. “The Signaling Value of Peer Review.”

Articles

Manuel Ostos. “What Do They Use? Where Do They Get It? An Interdisciplinary Citation Analysis of Latin American Studies Faculty Monographs, 2004–2013.”

Tao Zhang, Xi Niu, and Marlen Promann. “Assessing the User Experience of E-Books in Academic Libraries.”

Jenny S. Bossaller and Heather Moulaison Sandy. “Documenting the Conversation: A Systematic Review of Library Discovery Layers.”

Ellen Nierenberg. “A Comparison of Nursing and Teacher Education Students’ Information Literacy Learning: Results from Norway, 2016.”

Frans Albarillo. “Is the Library’s Online Orientation Program Effective with English Language Learners?

Shannon L. Farrell, Amy E. Neeser, and Carolyn Bishoff. “Academic Uses of Video Games: A Qualitative Assessment of Research and Teaching Needs at a Large Research University.”

Scott Spicer and Andrew Horbal. “The Future of Video Playback Capability in College and University Classrooms.”

Book Reviews

Kelli Johnson. Ann Whitney Gleason. New Methods of Teaching and Learning in Libraries. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2017. 200p. Paper, $55.00 (ISBN 978-1-4422-6411-3).

Lizzy Walker. Linked Data for Cultural Heritage. Eds. Ed Jones and Michele Seikel for the Association for Library Collections and Technical Services. Chicago: American Library Association, 2016. 134p. $75.00 (ISBN 978-0-8389-1439-7).

Ryan Litsey. The Small and Rural Academic Library: Leveraging Resources and Overcoming Limitations. Eds. Kaetrena Davis Kendrick and Deborah Tritt. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries, 2016. 2016. 264p. Paper, $56.00 (ISBN 978-083898900-5).

Jenny S. Bossaller. Choosing to Lead: The Motivational Factors of Underrepresented Minority Librarians in Higher Education. Ed. Antonia P. Olivas. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries, 2017. 151p. Paper, $38.00 (ISBN 978-083898887-9).

Dana Hart. New Directions for Special Collections: An Anthology of Practice. Eds. Lynne M. Thomas and Beth M. Whittaker. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Libraries Unlimited, 2017. 249p. $85.00 (ISBN 978-1-4408-4290-0).

Ruth Szpunar. Collaborating for Impact: Special Collections and Liaison Librarian Partnerships. Eds. Kristen Totleben and Lori Birrell. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries, 2016. 270p. $60.00 (ISBN 978-083898883-1).

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