Category Archives: Member of the Week

Member of the Week: Christina Sibley

Christina SibleyChristina Sibley is Distance Education Librarian at Arizona Western College in Yuma, AZ. Christina has been an ACRL member since 2005 and is your ACRL member of the week for September 19, 2016.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Creative, helpful, dependable.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I just finished The M Train by Patti Smith and The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt. I have begun Gloria Steinem’s new memoir My Life on the Road.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Camaraderie, development, leadership.

4. What do you value about ACRL? The opportunity to meet my peers from across the country and get exposed to new ideas.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? As Distance Education Librarian I provide library support and instruction to our online and distance campus students, as well as participating in reference, instruction and collection development with my colleagues in the library.

6. In your own words: Community colleges have diverse student populations. One minute I can be helping a traditional young college student, another minute a middle aged person learning English as a second language, and next a trucker who is working on a certificate in logistics and wants to move into that type of work. I enjoy this diversity. It’s exciting to see students progressing towards their goals. Sometimes the older students who have been away from school for a long time are a little nervous and I can encourage them by letting them know that I, too, returned to school later in life for a career change and they can succeed. Being a community college librarian is rewarding.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Orolando Duffus

Orolando DuffusOrolando Duffus is Business Librarian at the University of Houston in Houston, TX. Orolando has been an ACRL member since 2014 and is your ACRL member of the week for September 12, 2016.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Resilient, motivated, gracious.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I am currently reading Michael Eric Dyson’s book entitled The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America. In addition, I enjoy reading Steve Cramer’s blog posts, where he shares his “adventures as an embedded business librarian.” I use my mobile devices to listen to a wide cross-section of music from artists such as Celine Dion, Luther Vandross, and the legendary Bob Marley.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Supportive, community, resource.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I have been very fortunate throughout my career to cross paths with great mentors, many of whom are longstanding members of ACRL. The association recognizes that mentorship is an essential part of recruiting and retaining librarians who are of underrepresented backgrounds. I see great value in ACRL’s ability to demonstrate its commitment to diversity through the establishment of mentorship programs such as the Dr. E. J. Josey Spectrum Scholar Mentor Program.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? As a teaching librarian, it is compulsory that I wear many hats. Faculty/staff depend on my colleagues and me to develop and maintain a comprehensive collection to support their research and interests. The students also depend on me to be their coach/mentor, career counselor, advocate, etc. My contribution to campus is best summarized by the testimonials from many of my students. At the conclusion of each semester I receive unsolicited endorsements from students who use words such as essential, crucial, pivotal and important to describe the services and support that I’ve provided.

6. In your own words: The roles and functions of academic/research librarians have evolved over many centuries and are expected to continue evolving with the needs of our patrons. Therefore, it is imperative that I stay current and proactive so that I may be effective in meeting the needs of my constituents. My job as a business librarian is thrilling and very exciting in that it allows me to be a change agent—some of my basic job functions may directly impact student success, retention and their future.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Emma Molls

Emma MollsEmma Molls has been appointed Publishing Services Librarian at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, MN. Until August, Emma served as Scholarly Communication Librarian at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. Emma has been an ACRL member since 2012 and is your ACRL member of the week for September 5, 2016.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Energetic, curious, vegetarian.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? Rereading Citizen: An American Lyric by Claudia Rankine and Dykes to Watch Out For by Alison Bechdel.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Evolving, engaging, purposeful.

4. What do you value about ACRL? ACRL creates a space for the exchange of ideas and dialogue among members. Often times, especially as an early career librarian working in scholarly communication, my work can feel isolating—ACRL assists me in finding folks working on similar projects at ACRL workshops, conferences, and webinars. One of my favorite recent discussions was the SPARC/ACRL Forum at ALA Annual on transitioning journals from subscription to open.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? As a scholarly communication librarian, my main role is to bring together perspectives and innovations from multiple disciplines across campus.  My greatest moments come when I get to hear faculty/students from one discipline identify a problem or frustration, only to find a borrowed solution from another discipline. Along with my colleagues, my major contribution to campus is to remind researchers that now, more than ever, the academic library plays a major role in the research ecosystem.

6. In your own words: It is an exciting time to be a librarian working in the research world. The rise of open access content has given us the opportunity to rethink and rebuild systems to better serve researchers and libraries. My favorite part about being a librarian is that I also get to be an advocate; an advocate for open access and information justice.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Brad Warren

Brad WarrenBrad Warren is Director of Access Services at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. Brad has been an ACRL member since 2013 and is your ACRL member of the week for August 29, 2016.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Irreverent, motivated, innovative.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I am just finishing up Reframing Academic Leadership, by Lee Bolman and Joan Gallos in preparation for the Leadership Institute for Academic Librarians along with a bevy of other readings.  Normally, I am firmly in the horror and sci-fi genres and am happily returning to Justin Cronin’s City of Mirrors, which is the last book in his “The Passage” trilogy.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Relevant, supportive, engaged.

4. What do you value about ACRL? ACRL has given me a home for what I do and a group of colleagues who have been supportive and helpful to my career.  I am especially grateful to the ACRL board for approving my petition to create the Access Services Interest Group, which is officially part of ACRL this year!  Having spent my entire career in access services, I am immensely happy and gratified to see ACRL providing a home for this specialization in librarianship.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? I oversee access services and programs at the Sterling Memorial and Bass Libraries at Yale University. This includes front-line desk services, information services, resource sharing, reserves, shelving, shipping and receiving, retrievals and processing, and a smattering of a lot of other things to support our students, faculty, and staff at Yale. My job is to ensure that our services are relevant, well-used, efficient, and exceeding expectations wherever possible. I firmly believe that core library services supported by our department are and will continue to be essential to the scholarship and research at our campus, and I hope that my and my staff’s efforts remove as many barriers as possible to connecting our users with the materials they need.

6. In your own words: I started as a staff member at Indiana University and became intrigued by academic librarianship soon thereafter. I have found this career to be intellectually stimulating, challenging, and rewarding in ways that I couldn’t imagine when I started. Librarianship is an intrinsically rewarding profession and attracts people who are service oriented and enjoy working in an intellectually stimulating environment. I have wanted to make a positive impact in my various positions and hope that I have succeeded and will continue to do so in the future. Academic libraries have seen a tremendous amount of change in the past 20 years and I am glad to have been a part of it in really diverse institutions and positions.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Megan Sapp Nelson

Megan Sapp NelsonMegan Sapp Nelson is Associate Professor of Library Science at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. Megan first joined ACRL in 2014 and is your ACRL member of the week for August 22, 2016.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Seeking better solutions.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I am currently in the midst of Justin Cronin’s Passage Trilogy. I am obsessed with podcasts. My favorite right now is Malcolm Gladwell’s Revisionist History. If you haven’t heard the episode “The Lady Vanishes,” drop everything and go listen.  It completely changed how I have viewed the last eight years in the US and this political season.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Professional development, infrastructure.

4. What do you value about ACRL? ACRL invests in the skills development of its members in a variety of ways. I attended Immersion Teaching Track in 2012 and it gave me the opportunity to transform a class as well as to change my teaching habits. I’ve internalized backward design of instruction at this point and that training started with Immersion. It’s made me a more efficient and more effective teacher.

On the other side of the professional development coin, I’ve had the opportunity to be a curriculum developer for the Building Your Research Data Management Tool Kit Road Show and it has been one of the most challenging and interesting professional endeavors I’ve undertaken. I look forward to providing skills development for other ACRL members in the coming months.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? I serve as a liaison to six departments in the colleges of Engineering and Science and Purdue Polytechnic. Additionally, I have a functional role to provide support for researchers dealing with data management in the STEM fields at Purdue. My contributions to my campus are generally in one of two areas, curriculum integration of IL/ data information literacy skills or research support.

6. In your own words: Academic libraries have always been at the heart of campus, but with our involvement moving to the beginning of the scholarly communication life cycle, facilitating the creation and long-term management of data as well as all of the scholarly by-products that result from research, our work is now at the core of the research mission of the institution. Our own research now has the potential to impact the practices of our disciplinary faculty in ways that we couldn’t conceive when I began my career in libraries in 2003. It’s a fascinating and exhilarating time to be an academic librarian.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

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