Category Archives: Member of the Week

Member of the Week: Brad Warren

Brad WarrenBrad Warren is Director of Access Services at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. Brad has been an ACRL member since 2013 and is your ACRL member of the week for August 29, 2016.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Irreverent, motivated, innovative.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I am just finishing up Reframing Academic Leadership, by Lee Bolman and Joan Gallos in preparation for the Leadership Institute for Academic Librarians along with a bevy of other readings.  Normally, I am firmly in the horror and sci-fi genres and am happily returning to Justin Cronin’s City of Mirrors, which is the last book in his “The Passage” trilogy.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Relevant, supportive, engaged.

4. What do you value about ACRL? ACRL has given me a home for what I do and a group of colleagues who have been supportive and helpful to my career.  I am especially grateful to the ACRL board for approving my petition to create the Access Services Interest Group, which is officially part of ACRL this year!  Having spent my entire career in access services, I am immensely happy and gratified to see ACRL providing a home for this specialization in librarianship.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? I oversee access services and programs at the Sterling Memorial and Bass Libraries at Yale University. This includes front-line desk services, information services, resource sharing, reserves, shelving, shipping and receiving, retrievals and processing, and a smattering of a lot of other things to support our students, faculty, and staff at Yale. My job is to ensure that our services are relevant, well-used, efficient, and exceeding expectations wherever possible. I firmly believe that core library services supported by our department are and will continue to be essential to the scholarship and research at our campus, and I hope that my and my staff’s efforts remove as many barriers as possible to connecting our users with the materials they need.

6. In your own words: I started as a staff member at Indiana University and became intrigued by academic librarianship soon thereafter. I have found this career to be intellectually stimulating, challenging, and rewarding in ways that I couldn’t imagine when I started. Librarianship is an intrinsically rewarding profession and attracts people who are service oriented and enjoy working in an intellectually stimulating environment. I have wanted to make a positive impact in my various positions and hope that I have succeeded and will continue to do so in the future. Academic libraries have seen a tremendous amount of change in the past 20 years and I am glad to have been a part of it in really diverse institutions and positions.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Megan Sapp Nelson

Megan Sapp NelsonMegan Sapp Nelson is Associate Professor of Library Science at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. Megan first joined ACRL in 2014 and is your ACRL member of the week for August 22, 2016.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Seeking better solutions.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I am currently in the midst of Justin Cronin’s Passage Trilogy. I am obsessed with podcasts. My favorite right now is Malcolm Gladwell’s Revisionist History. If you haven’t heard the episode “The Lady Vanishes,” drop everything and go listen.  It completely changed how I have viewed the last eight years in the US and this political season.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Professional development, infrastructure.

4. What do you value about ACRL? ACRL invests in the skills development of its members in a variety of ways. I attended Immersion Teaching Track in 2012 and it gave me the opportunity to transform a class as well as to change my teaching habits. I’ve internalized backward design of instruction at this point and that training started with Immersion. It’s made me a more efficient and more effective teacher.

On the other side of the professional development coin, I’ve had the opportunity to be a curriculum developer for the Building Your Research Data Management Tool Kit Road Show and it has been one of the most challenging and interesting professional endeavors I’ve undertaken. I look forward to providing skills development for other ACRL members in the coming months.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? I serve as a liaison to six departments in the colleges of Engineering and Science and Purdue Polytechnic. Additionally, I have a functional role to provide support for researchers dealing with data management in the STEM fields at Purdue. My contributions to my campus are generally in one of two areas, curriculum integration of IL/ data information literacy skills or research support.

6. In your own words: Academic libraries have always been at the heart of campus, but with our involvement moving to the beginning of the scholarly communication life cycle, facilitating the creation and long-term management of data as well as all of the scholarly by-products that result from research, our work is now at the core of the research mission of the institution. Our own research now has the potential to impact the practices of our disciplinary faculty in ways that we couldn’t conceive when I began my career in libraries in 2003. It’s a fascinating and exhilarating time to be an academic librarian.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Brandon West

Brandon WestBrandon West is Social Sciences Librarian at SUNY Geneseo in Geneseo, NY. Brandon has been an ACRL member since 2014 and is your ACRL member of the week for August 15, 2016.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Driven, genial, collaborative.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I am reading Nolo’s Essential Guide to Buying Your First Home by Alayna Schroeder, Llona Bray, and Marcia Stewart as I creep into the world of adulting.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Essential, progressive, community.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I value being able to participate in an active community that is both intellectual and passionate. Whenever I have needed guidance on a project or idea, I have been able to count on other ACRL members to share their experience and perspectives. I consider ACRL to be the most beneficial and relevant source of professional development for academic librarians.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? As a faculty member, I am highly involved with campus community on a variety of levels from providing reference and instruction services to helping support online course development to making the campus a safer place for the LGBTQ community. In a larger sense, I promote information literacy; connect people to ideas, resources, and services; encourage students to do their best; listen to and support students, faculty, and staff.

6. In your own words: As an academic librarian, I am a creative problem solver. I spend my days figuring out how to best teach my students, inventing new library services, developing my scholarly agenda, and more. Being a voice in the evolving academic landscape energizes me and makes me feel like I am making a difference in the world.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Joelle Pitts

Joelle PittsJoelle Pitts is Associate Professor and Instructional Design Librarian at Kansas State University in Manhattan, KS. Joelle has been an ACRL member since 2011 and is your ACRL member of the week for August 8, 2016.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Driven, analytical, collaborative.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I’m currently listening to Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain, an introvert’s manifesto. Lately my print reading hours have been filled with Teaching Information Threshold Concepts edited by Bravender, McClure, & Schaub, infused here and there with doses of Thomas Kuhn’s Structure of Scientific Revolutions.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Collaborative, advocacy, network.

4. What do you value about ACRL? ACRL has given me a professional home which allows me to serve my profession though the Distance Learning Section, as well as access to various professional development and learning opportunities. I love that I can come away from the conferences with an in-depth look into new projects and initiatives in addition to a broader view of the big trends and ideas in the profession. I also value the critical and thoughtful discussions that take place at the conferences, on listservs, and in publications like C&RL News.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? I’m an instructional design librarian, a position that I’ve learned looks different at each institution. At K-State, a lot of the work I do is behind the scenes creating tutorials and learning environments to teach information literacy competencies. I think a big part of my role here is to help both our teaching faculty and our library staff look at library instruction in new and different ways, based on how the human brain transfers information.

I have played a large role in our efforts to flip our high-enrollment one-shot instruction to an online environment and have worked to embed library instruction into the curriculum of the English Language Program. I also spend a lot of my time leading the New Literacies Alliance, an inter-institutional collaborative developing online lessons based on the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy. Our lessons are being used in many classes on campus and are being scaffolded into several programs, getting us closer and closer to library-infused curricula.

6. In your own words: I came to academic librarianship very circuitously, holding jobs ranging from bank teller, to health inspector, to consortium coordinator. But when I finally landed here, I found “My People: those who care about education, service, and access. People who love learning and helping others find their way through the universe of information at their fingertips. People who will stay late to help a patron or sacrifice their weekend to staff an outreach event. People who will stand and read The Diary of Anne Frank or Naked Lunch aloud to a crowded plaza during Banned Books Week to celebrate the freedom to read.

Not many can truly say they love their job, but I really do. I think the important work we do as academic librarians is making our world a better place, one reference transaction, info-lit tutorial, line of metadata, digital collection, or open access discussion at a time.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Clint Chamberlain

Clint ChamberlainClint Chamberlain is Educational Resource Support Officer at the Dallas County Community College District in Dallas, Texas. Clint first joined ACRL in 2003 and is your ACRL member of the week for August 1, 2016.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Contemplative, inquisitive, compassionate.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I usually have a book in just about every room of the house, so that no matter which room I’m in there’s a book to be read. In no particular order, here’s what I’m reading this week, depending upon where I am in my house: Edward Carpenter by Sheila Rowbotham, The Food Lover’s Garden by Mark Diacono, and Gaia’s Garden by Toby Hemenway. And I’m re-reading Neil Gaiman’s American Gods. Don’t even get me started on the piles of magazines I peruse during lunch – I think the latest issue of Audubon is on tap for today.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Collaborative, engaged, community.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I value the connections I’ve made through ACRL. These days I don’t get to go to as many conferences as I did earlier in my career, so I appreciate getting C&RL and C&RL News as a way to remain current.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? As the head of a technical services operation that serves seven colleges, I’m not actually at a campus but rather in a centralized location that serves all of our district’s constituent colleges that are spread all over Dallas County. By virtue of that, I have the privilege of working with the library directors and librarians at seven quite diverse institutions. A huge part of my job is making sure that our department enables access to our resources that is as seamless as possible for our users, whether they’re students and faculty at a college in the core of downtown Dallas or enrolled in one of our distance learning programs. If we can make things available for our students and faculty in such a way that access is something they don’t have to think about but instead just do, then we’ve made it that much easier for them to get about the real business of teaching and learning.

6. In your own words: I always intended to be an academic—one of my middle school teachers told my parents that I was destined to be an absent-minded professor because I already had the absent-mindedness down pat—but I sort of fell into librarianship by accident. I was pursuing another advanced degree, another career path, but I was lucky enough to have a job as a student assistant in a small branch library at that university, where there was a librarian who saw my aptitude for dealing with the challenges unique to serials. He later said that I had a tolerance for ambiguity, for recognizing and being at peace with the fact that some messes are never completely resolved, and for wrestling with the many-tentacled octopi that are continuing resources. Whatever the case, I was hooked on solving problems for others and also realized that I loved coming to work at the library every day, not just for the work itself but also for the chance to be with my fascinating coworkers. Although I’m no longer so directly involved in dealing with continuing resources, I’ve found that tolerance for ambiguity and for realizing that things are not always neat and tidy are real assets in librarianship today as we face so many challenges coming at us from seemingly all directions. Those fascinating coworkers are even better assets—librarians as a group have such wide-ranging interests and deep knowledge and that combined with the urge to serve and connect gives us a great perspective on how to navigate the changes affecting the academy.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

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