Category Archives: Member of the Week

Member of the Week: Howard C. Marks

Howard C. MarksHoward C. Marks is the director of library services at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin in Odessa, Texas. Howard has been an ACRL member since 2015 and is your ACRL member of the week for March 27, 2017.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Creative problem solver.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? Strengths Based Leadership: Great Leaders, Teams, And Why People Follow by Tom Rath, The 360 Degree Leader by John C. Maxwell, Born To Run by Bruce Springsteen and The Complete Pink Floyd: The Ultimate Reference by Glenn Povey.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Innovative professional connector.

4. What do you value about ACRL? ACRL has been the natural bridge for learning, from reading the College and Research Libraries monthly publications to attending my first upcoming conference in Baltimore. It is the top caliber professional association of its size and scope in academic librarianship, period.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? As a manager and administrator and wearer of many hats, I always look to bring out the best in my people and myself. It’s all about recognizing strengths and weaknesses. I try to come up with new ideas and new plans for the library while maintaining the beautiful 66,000 square foot space we occupy. I work with the faculty, deans, and provost to bring new, informative programming to the smallest campus in the University of Texas system. This last month, along with Midland College, we offered a free f2f copyright workshop with an Austin, Texas attorney/librarian expert Gretchen McCord, targeted at faculty. We are currently working to develop an OER initiative with our own distance learning department, REACH, and partner with Odessa College. Collaboration is truly the key to success.

6. In your own words: Serving your constituents the best possible way you can is what makes every day of your career rewarding and worth calling yourself a librarian. How do you do that? You have team meetings, you make decisions, you implement new policies, you advocate. You try and you may fail, but you always succeed in the end. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not a simple 1-2-3. There is a lot of trial and error. You have to collect as much knowledge as you can. So soak it up. Study up on your audience and get the facts. You’ll get there sooner than later. One of my paramount goals for 2018 is to do a strategic plan for our library. We already have a mission, vision and goals in place. Librarianship and information science are growing so rapidly these days and there is an infinite amount to keep up with to stay ahead of the curve, but you can get there.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Katherine S. Donaldson

Katherine DonaldsonKatherine S. Donaldson is a social sciences and education librarian at the University of Oregon in Eugene, OR. Katherine has been an ACRL member since 2014 and is your ACRL member of the week for March 13, 2017.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Curious, motivated, reflective.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I’ve been reading a few essays from The Intersectional Internet: Race, Sex, Class, and Culture Online, edited by Safiya Noble and Brendesha Tynes. I’m also currently reading IQ by Joe Ide and Without You, There Is No Us by Suki Kim.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Collaborative, informative, discovery.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I value the many opportunities that ACRL provides to connect with other members of the academic library community through its sections, interest groups, and committees. As an early-career librarian, I have found that ACRL provides a wealth of resources for professional development. I appreciate that there are many opportunities for members to get involved at all levels and with different interest areas.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? I am the UO Libraries primary liaison to the College of Education. This means that I get to work with a wide variety of undergraduate and graduate students, faculty members, and researchers with interests in teaching, learning, and social equity. I provide information literacy instruction, research consultations, and collection development services to support members of this community.

6. In your own words: I have found it to be very rewarding to work with students and faculty to support a community of learning and scholarship. No two days of work are ever the same and I’m always learning something new! It’s also been fulfilling to be part of a larger professional community that values information access, literacy, and intellectual freedom.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Mandi Goodsett

Mandi GoodsettMandi Goodsett is the performing arts and humanities librarian at Cleveland State University in Cleveland, OH. Mandi has been an ACRL member since 2013 and is your ACRL member of the week for February 27, 2017.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Curious, driven, authentic.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I’m currently listening to Myth in Human History, an audio course from the Great Courses taught by Grant Voth; reading How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World by Steven Johnson, as a member of my university’s Common Reading Committee; and reading Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman, for fun.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Collaborative, discursive, forward-thinking.

4. What do you value about ACRL? As a new librarian, ACRL has welcomed me with open arms into its community of hard-working, inspiring librarians. Opportunities to network, share my scholarship, and grow as a professional abound, and I feel lucky to be part of a profession with such a strong community.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? Besides teaching students how to use and evaluate information, guiding students through their research in reference consultations, and strategically building strong collections, I think librarians serve as an important hub of collaboration for the entire campus. In a given day, I might work with our eLearning Department, university IT staff, my liaison department chairs, or the Writing Center, not to mention the community groups, businesses, and other libraries in the area that my own library has reached out to for programming and events. I would venture to say that you wouldn’t find this much collaborative cooperation anywhere else on campus.

6. In your own words: It can be difficult for new academic librarians to adjust to the pressures and politics of higher education (and the feeling of imposter syndrome), but I believe that when more experienced librarians share their expertise and new librarians share their enthusiasm, really great things can happen.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Piper Martin

Piper MartinPiper Martin is the humanities and communication liaison librarian at the University of Wyoming in Laramie, WY. Piper has been an ACRL member since 2003 and is your ACRL member of the week for February 21, 2017.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Empathetic, skeptical, reflective.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? The Invention of Paris: A History in Footsteps by Eric Hazan; A Brief History of Seven Killings by Marlon James; Memories from Moscow to the Black Sea by Teffi; and Information Literacy and Social Justice edited by Lua Gregory and Shana Higgins.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Collaborative, connective, supportive.

4. What do you value about ACRL? ACRL has been crucial in expanding my professional horizons, from serving on committees to attending inspiring conferences to reading its publications. I especially appreciate the structure ACRL provides to help connect librarians from all over North America; I have formed invaluable relationships—both collaborators and friends—through ACRL that have enriched my work and life immeasurably. Lastly, I am grateful for ACRL’s efforts to move our profession forward.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? As a liaison librarian in the research and instruction department of my library, my focus is on teaching and learning. I collaborate with teaching faculty to create dynamic, student-centered assignments and activities for instruction sessions in the disciplines with which I work, individual research consultations, and workshops. I will also teach a 3-credit course in the spring semester that incorporates the ACRL Framework and concepts of social justice. One of the most important aspects of my liaison work is building relationships: with teaching faculty, students, and members of the campus, community, and state. Through these relationships I am able to communicate the library’s importance and connection to the research and teaching that form the core mission of the university.

6. In your own words: I feel extraordinarily fortunate to be in a profession that allows me to regularly interact with so many intelligent, engaged people. It is both energizing and challenging to work alongside students as we grapple with the issues surrounding information in our world, and as trite as it sounds, every day I learn something new and stimulating. I am proud of the way that academic librarians have responded so nimbly to changes in higher education, and I look forward to continuing to create a better environment in which our students, staff, and faculty can learn and grow.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Christina Chan-Park

Christina Chan-ParkChristina Chan-Park is a science librarian at Baylor University in Waco, TX. She recently joined the presenter team for ACRL’s new licensed workshop Building Your Research Data Management Toolkit: Integrating RDM Into Your Liaison Work. Christina has been an ACRL member since 2013 and is your ACRL member of the week for February 13, 2017.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Curious, brain-stormer, learner.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I am reading Toddler 411 by Ari Brown and Denise Fields. We adopted a 2-year old boy this past spring and I try to read a few pages each night while he plays during his bath.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Community, academic, dedicated.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I enjoy being around like-minded people in the ACRL community who have a passion for helping students and faculty succeed.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? I have a much longer background as an academic than as a librarian so I often bring to my librarian colleagues a different perspective. The teaching and research faculty realize that I am a librarian by choice and that I have received as rigorous training as they have but are still sometimes surprised at the help and insight I can give them on their work.

6. In your own words: For me after jobs in teaching, research, and administration at the university level, being an academic/research librarian just feels right. I discovered over the years, that I like teaching process rather than content and specifically guiding others through the different stages of research. I like the one-on-one interaction and the exposure to different fields, and I have a soft-spot for graduate students.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

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