Category Archives: Member of the Week

Member of the Week: Yu-Hui Chen

Yu-Hui ChenYu-Hui Chen is Subject Librarian for Education and East Asia Studies at the University at Albany, SUNY in Albany, NY. Yu-Hui has been an ACRL member since 2008 and is your ACRL member of the week for October 24, 2016.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Dedicated, intellectually curious.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I am reading The Buddha in Your Mirror: Practical Buddhism and the Search for Self by Woody Hochswender. 

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Supportive, educational, opportunity.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I value ACRL’s leadership in supporting the professional growth of librarians from diverse backgrounds through professional development programs and service opportunities. I also value the strong commitment demonstrated by its members, who volunteer their time and expertise to advance the organization and communicate the value of academic and research librarianship in higher education.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? I contribute to my university’s mission and values by developing library collections that support learning, teaching, and research; facilitating ease of resource access and information discovery via library web usability studies; and fostering lifelong learners with critical thinking and problem-solving skills through instruction and research assistance. I support the university’s strategic goals by reaching out to our international students and helping them succeed academically through research and plagiarism workshops and by working with teaching faculty to prepare our students to become knowledge workers. My research on web usability and user education is intended to contribute to the knowledge base in the field and increase the national and international visibility of the university, especially the university libraries and their scholarship.  As I strive to be an effective teacher and a good researcher, I am also dedicated to both governance and non-governance committee work to help the university fulfill its mission.

6. In your own words: I enjoy working with students and teaching faculty in higher education, an intellectually stimulating environment. Teaching and learning go hand in hand. I always make an effort to build on my knowledge and skills during the process of helping students with their research projects or preparing teaching materials for course-related instruction. As a firm believer in user-centered service, I find their smiles of satisfaction extremely rewarding.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Sarah J. Wright

Sarah J. WrightSarah J. Wright is Life Sciences Librarian for Research at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. Sarah has been an ACRL member since 2015 and is your ACRL member of the week for October 17, 2016.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Creative, adventurous, and spontaneous—how else do you think I got to be a librarian?!

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I have three ebooks loaded right now! Let the Great World Spin by Colum McCann, which I started reading in preparation for a trip to NYC last weekend and I’m totally consumed by it; Barkskins by Annie Proulx, which I’ve just begun and am very excited about because I love Annie Proulx and her writing and it’s been a long time; and The Days of Abandonment by Elena Ferrante. That one is up next because I read the Neapolitan novels, didn’t want them to end, and decided to try another of her books. I also have a pile of books leaning dangerously on the side table in my dining room, but between kids and life, I haven’t gotten to them yet.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: I am terrible at this! Awesome, community, support.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I love that I have such a great group of colleagues that I can rely on to support me, challenge me, keep me informed, and help me grow in my career—that’s ACRL in a nutshell to me. I rely on ACRL for ongoing professional development and learning opportunities, and have been lucky to learn from so many excellent colleagues! Now that I get to be a presenter for the Building Your Research Data Management Tool Kit Road Show, I welcome the opportunity to give back to my colleagues in an area that I have some expertise in.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? I am the Life Sciences Librarian for Research at Albert R. Mann Library, which serves the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Human Ecology at Cornell University. In that role, I do a lot of different things including reference, instruction, and liaison services. My major passion as a former researcher (lab rat) turned librarian is the research support part of my job, and I’m an active member of the Research Data Management Service Group (RDMSG), a collaborative, campus-wide organization that assists with creating and implementing data management plans, applying best practices for managing data, and finding data management services.

6. In your own words: I became a librarian because I thought it would be an engaging and exciting career, and one that would enable me to continue learning for the rest of my life. I have not been disappointed. I feel that I am particularly fortunate to be a librarian in such exciting times, when we are looking forward and thinking about how we can best position ourselves strategically as active participants within the research life cycle of the university. I am so lucky to be intellectually stimulated and engaged every day!


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Elizabeth Dupuis

Elizabeth DupuisElizabeth Dupuis is Associate University Librarian for Educational Initiatives & User Services and Director of Doe, Moffitt, and the Subject Specialty Libraries at the University of California, Berkeley in Berkeley, CA. Elizabeth has been an ACRL member since 1997 and is your ACRL member of the week for October 10, 2016.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Attentive, resourceful, undaunted.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I tend to juggle several books simultaneously. Right now I’m at different stages of Trigger Warning by Neil Gaiman; Voices of the Wild: Animal Songs, Human Din, and the Call to Save Natural Soundscapes by Bernie Krause; Bridging the Divide between Faculty and Administration: A Guide to Understanding Conflict in the Academy by James Bess and Jay Dee; and Machines Who Think: A Personal Inquiry into the History and Prospects of Artificial Intelligence by Pamela McCorduck.  (Yes, I check out many books from our library and, so far, I prefer print.)

3. Describe ACRL in three four words: Complex, inclusive, responsive, stimulating.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I value ACRL’s progressive view of issues covering a wide range of specializations, traditional strengths, and emerging areas relevant to libraries and higher education. I value ACRL as a national forum for sharing effective models, developing best practices, and questioning assumptions. And on a personal level, I value ACRL’s role as a professional network. When I was a new librarian, seasoned ACRL members were welcoming and inspiring to me; as a more seasoned member now, the opportunities to work with new professionals continue to be refreshing.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? Over the years my specific responsibilities have changed as I moved from an instruction librarian to a director, but my purpose has remained constant. I aim to represent the interests and nuances of many user populations, functions, and disciplines to create the most productive environment for people at all levels—from novice to expert. I love helping people discover ideas and develop their own skills and abilities. And I love convincing people how libraries contribute to research and learning.

6. In your own words: I have enjoyed working at three large, public, research universities. Each enriched my awareness of and my interest in a broad array of issues for libraries and higher education more generally. I gravitate toward roles and projects that require creativity, problem solving, and collaboration. Fortunately there seems to be an endless number of opportunities for librarians to partner in high-visibility and high-impact activities that reinforce and amplify our campus’ mission and include all these elements.  Our environment within libraries changes all the time—with limited budgets, new approaches, emerging demands—so librarians are constantly rethinking how to best position ourselves and our organizations for the future. It is a demanding kind of fun!


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Mark E. Shelton

Mark E. SheltonMark E. Shelton is Director of Library Services at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Mark has been an ACRL member since 1997 and is your ACRL member of the week for October 3, 2016.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Friendly, enthusiastic, and perceptive.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? Right at the moment, I am reading Reimagining the Academic Library by David W. Lewis. I am only about half way through and if the second half is as good as the first, then it will be a truly beneficial professional read. For more of an entertaining read, I am reading Marie Lu’s The Young Elites. Having grown up on Stephen King, Piers Anthony, Terry Brooks, Greg Bear, and Michael Crichton, I haven’t read many of these young adult dystopian series. So this is my first foray into a genre I haven’t explored yet beyond the movies that have been made out of them.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Invaluable, important, and progressive.

4. What do you value about ACRL? There are so many different kinds of academic libraries from the large research library to small liberal arts college libraries to community college libraries. Although the organization and scale of them are different, we all face extremely similar challenges while trying to achieve very similar outcomes. The foundations of our purposes run parallel. As a result, ACRL provides a diverse yet homogeneous community from which to learn and benefit. Being able to see how each of our libraries addresses challenges through a slightly different lens makes it possible to see my own library’s challenges much more clearly. ACRL makes this possible through so many different channels.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? As an academic librarian, I am on the front lines of open intellectual exploration. In addition to providing unfettered access to a borderless world of information and content, we provide systems that make the process of discovery efficient and we give students and faculty skills and abilities that they can use well beyond our institutional walls. Education is about discovery, and we create an environment on our campus where discovery is unlimited.

6. In your own words: Ever since I read the book Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes, I have been fascinated by the idea of learning about many different fields of study. Michelangelo was very broadly educated and could apply diverse ideas to many different challenges. We label people as Renaissance Men based on the range of their learning. The academic library is, in my view, the unlimited brain. As an academic librarian, not only do I benefit, but I also make it possible for so many others to seek, to explore, to learn, to reach, and to become boundless in their thinking. The academic library is what higher education is all about. I can only hope that Charlie Gordon would look on me and be pleased.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Nicole A. Cooke

Nicole A. CookeNicole A. Cooke is Assistant Professor at the School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in Champaign, IL. Nicole has been an ACRL member since 2000 and is your ACRL member of the week for September 26, 2016.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Advocate, curious, innovative.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I’m currently on a podcast kick—right now I’m working my way through Black Girl Nerds, Serial, Undisclosed, and two series by comedian W. Kamau Bell.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Foundational, necessary, community.

4. What do you value about ACRL? ACRL was my primary source of professional development and community during my 13 years in the field. And even now, as a LIS faculty member, the ACRL conference remains one of my favorite events because of its focus, dedication, and relevance to the field. When I teach my graduate classes, I routinely promote ACRL and talk about my positive experiences in the Immersion program (program and intentional teaching tracks) and refer students to ACRL documents and resources. ACRL is an invaluable resource for academic librarians and it’s an organization that grows with them as they progress throughout their careers.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? I’m in a fortunate position to be a faculty member (and still an academic librarian!) who gets to work with students, and who gets to promote librarians and the university library to my colleagues in other disciplines and departments.

Because I interact with faculty in many settings outside of the actual library, I’m able to network and promote on another level, and I’m able to closely connect with them about their research and teaching in new and different ways.

Recently, I’ve helped colleagues with copyright questions, and inquiries about microaggressions and accessible services for students. I was able to field the questions and then redirect them to our library’s subject experts for additional resources and information.

6. In your own words: Academic/ research librarianship has been my first and only career, one that has enabled me to teach (full-time and part-time), do research, publish articles and books, advance my education, meet wonderful people, travel around the world, and improve and empower my communities through the provision of information. Where else could I have done that?


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

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