Category Archives: Member of the Week

Member of the Week: Alexandra Janvey

Alexandra JanveyAlexandra Janvey is a Library Assistant in the B. Davis Schwartz Memorial Library at Long Island University in Long Island, New York. Alexandra has been an ACRL member since 2009, is a 2015 ALA Emerging Leader, and your ACRL member of the week for February 9, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Tenacious, generous, honest.

2. What are you currently reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? The Design of Everyday Things by Donald A. Norman.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Useful, educating, supportive.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I value the support and opportunities that ACRL provides for information professionals to share their ideas and experiences. Something that is especially important in a constantly changing profession such as ours.

5. What do you as a library assistant contribute to your campus? As a Library Assistant in the Digital Initiatives Department, I provide reference assistance to art students and teach library instruction sessions for the art department. Another part of my job is to provide research support for the William Randolph Hearst Archive, which is housed in my department. This includes answering reference requests from all over the world and aiding in developing digital projects.

6. In your own words: Being able to help students with their research and find what they need is extremely rewarding. The same can be said about helping the public find what they are looking for within the archives. I love what I do, the people I work with, and I can help people develop critical research skills that they will continue to use.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Crystal Boyce

Crystal BoyceCrystal Boyce is Sciences Librarian at the Illinois Wesleyan University Ames Library in Bloomington, Illinois. Crystal has been an ACRL member since 2011, is a 2015 ALA Emerging Leader, and your ACRL member of the week for February 2, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Driven, curious, nerd.

2. What are you currently reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I’m halfway through Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners and have Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere teasing me from the bedside table.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Welcoming, progressive, connected.

4. What do you value about ACRL? The opportunity to work with a great group of people on issues that matter to today’s – and tomorrow’s – academic libraries.

5. What do you as an academic librarian contribute to your campus? I’m the liaison to biology, chemistry, computer science, math, and physics and the first year seminars taught by faculty from those disciplines. In addition to research, instruction, and collection support in those areas, I’m an advisor to first year students, am active on a number of campus committees, and co-supervise the campus’s research and technology support desk (located in the library). I especially love being an academic advisor, since I’m helping these students discover what they really want to do, not just what they think they should do. More than anything, I see my biggest contribution as supporting the liberal arts curriculum. I just wrapped up a three-part speaker series which brought together students and faculty from the sciences and humanities, to explore how the disciplines inform and are informed by each other.

6. In your own words: Life as an academic librarian is crazy and awesome at the same time. I’m usually juggling between 5 and 10 projects at a time and I’ve recently come to appreciate the value of my time. But the thing I love most is that moment when a student drops in unexpectedly, and we wind up spending an hour together working out the kinks of a research project. When I see that tension starts to ease . . . it’s cool to think that you were able to help with that.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Xiaoyu Duan

Xiaoyu DuanXiaoyu Duan is Humanities Cataloger at the University of Oklahoma Libraries in Norman, Oklahoma. Xiaoyu has been an ACRL member since 2014, is a 2015 ALA Emerging Leader, and your ACRL member of the week for January 26, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Enthusiastic, creative, sincere.

2. What are you currently reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I read novels, journals, and academic papers on my Xoom pad, and I use my mobile phone to listen to music and streaming radio.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Academic, active, diverse.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I value the opportunities and platforms ACRL provides for academic librarians for professional development, and I also value the information and trainings offered by ACRL to help new librarians become leaders in their profession.

5. What do you as an academic librarian contribute to your campus? I work as the humanities cataloger for my university libraries. By providing metadata records for the library resources, faculty, staff and students are able to search and use these resources from our library discovery service for their studies, research, and instruction.

6. In your own words: For me, to be an academic librarian is to be a person who opens the gates for faculty, staff, and students to access academic resources. Academic librarians also work with faculty, staff, and students to offer assistance during their research process. This is in support of the institution’s missions and goals.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Jeanne Drewes

Jeanne DrewesJeanne Drewes is Chief of the Binding and Collections Care Division/ Deacidification Program at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. Jeanne has been an ACRL member since 2010, and is your ACRL member of the week for January 19, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Energetic, dedicated, focused.

2. What are you currently reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I love Rasputina and Kaki King. I am reading a number of books: Tom Vick’s Asian Cinema; John Unkau’s Looking at Architecture with Ruskin; and Janet and Laura Greenwald’s Get Your Stuff Together, which is a very useful book to help avoid disastrous loss in a disaster. I am also reading Elephant Rocks, by Kay Ryan, former Poet Laureate. I always carry with me one of the ALA publications – C&RL, College and Research Libraries News, or American Libraries – because I can read articles during down time such as standing in line, or on the Metro and then do follow up from those articles when I get to work.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Connecting, informing, professional.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I value the programming and the publications, but most importantly I value the forum ACRL provides to connect with professionals and exchange ideas, solutions, and visions relating to our field.

5. What do you as a preservationist contribute to the higher education community? I use new technology to preserve and make accessible information, in many forms, for students, educators, researchers and future generations of scholars. One of the most interesting technologies to me is the ability to share the research and public programs we offer here, through webinars and videoconferencing to broadcast the preservation knowledge here at the Library of Congress. Our programs are often available even after the date by going to the website.

6. In your own words: My job is particularly satisfying because it enables me to interact with people from a wide-range of cultural institutions – libraries, archives, and museums. I use my knowledge and experience to help people preserve their treasures – those things that hold the memories of a culture or of a lifetime – for use, study or old-fashioned reminiscence by people who come after me. My day job is preserving the unmatched collections at the Library of Congress, so that those materials will last for future generations but my avocation is preserving family/individual collections such as family photographs or love letters from grandparents, or whatever holds memories. Also, when I have the luxury of unscheduled time, I enjoy hand book binding.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Rebecka Embry

Rebecka EmbryRebecka Embry is Library Director at the University of Arkansas Community College at Morrilton E. Allen Gordon Library in Morrilton, Arkansas. Rebecka has been an ACRL member since 2014, is a 2015 ALA Emerging Leader, and your ACRL member of the week for January 12, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Literate. Practical. Sweet.

2. What are you currently reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? Emily Post’s Wedding Etiquette, 6th edition. I’m getting married in June 2015! {Editor’s note: Congratulations!!}

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Educator. Connector. Helper.

4. What do you value about ACRL? It is the practical advice that ACRL provides academic librarians that I find the most valuable. I’ll have an idea for a library project or I’ll read about something another library is doing, but I need more information before figuring out if the project would work for our students. I can go to ACRL and read about the steps another library went through to implement a similar project and the struggles they experienced.

5. What do you as an academic librarian contribute to your campus? I have become enamored with the community college environment over the past two years. At UACCM, I have expanded what services our library can offer based on the needs of the students. Right now we are seeing success with providing students access to learning models that give hands on experience. By providing models in the library, students have convenient access that fits their study needs. I started out with human anatomy and physiology models, and I am in the process of expanding what we offer to include models that assist students in our technical degree fields.

6. In your own words: When it comes to the library I manage, no services are off limits to evaluation and change. I think about this often when I walk through my library and look at how the students are using the space. “That’s how it’s always been done” gets thrown out the window. Databases that are underutilized get reevaluated. As the degree programs and instructors on the campus have changed, so have how the students use our resources. We should be able to reconsider library services to make sure they are still effective and useful for our students without certain services being off limits.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

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