Category Archives: Member of the Week

Member of the Week: Faithe Ruiz

Faithe RuizFaithe Ruiz is Coordinator of Online Library Resources and Instruction at the College of Central Florida Clifford B. Stearns Learning Resources Center in Ocala, Florida. Faithe has been an ACRL member since 2014 and is your ACRL member of the week for December 14, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Industrious, Responsive, Intentional.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? My Struggle. Book One by Karl Ove Knausgaard, Living by the Word by Alice Walker, and Confessions of a Failed Southern Lady by Florence King. Most days, I am also reading my son’s favorites – Man in the Moon by William Joyce and Thumbelina: The Graphic Novel by Martin Powell and H C Andersen. Depending on mood, I choose from my favorite Pandora stations – Cocteau Twins, Tina Turner, Nina Simone, Bhi Bhiman, or Philip Glass.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Aware, Lively, Influential.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I value and respect ACRL for its scope and relentlessness in advocating for academic libraries and on issues of great social concern. The engaging manner in which ACRL approaches community and member support is much appreciated. And, I rarely put down the C&RL News without reading all of its content.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? As Coordinator of Online Library Resources and Instruction at the College of Central Florida, I develop and promote the library’s mobile and virtual services, focus on improving access to electronic offerings, and work with the E-Learning department to expand resources for faculty and students. My curiosity of legal designs and the law stirred an interest in copyright law as it relates to the academic community; I have initiated copyright literacy efforts for the college and am presently drafting a copyright education plan to support and further develop these efforts. My enthusiasm for learning and sharing information accompanies me to the reference desk each week and is nurtured by working with students and other patrons to support their research and discoveries.

6. In your own words: As I consider a long list of great moments and influences in my life, I find that the work of libraries and the progressive concerns of those working in the field align with my life and where I find meaning – being connected to purposes outside (and greater than) one’s self, knowledge for the sake of knowledge, commitment to the exploration and development of the whole person, and interconnectedness. The more contact I have with others living by these tenets, the more inspired I am by cooperative arrangements and how they foster innovative work experiences and a healthy community.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Jingfeng Xia

Jingfeng XiaJingfeng Xia is Director of the Library at the State University of New York at Rockland in Suffern, New York. Jingfeng has been an ACRL member since 2005 and is your ACRL member of the week for December 7, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Learning, thinking, working.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? Library Ethics, authored by Jean Preer, published by Libraries Unlimited; Getting the Word Out: Academic Libraries as Scholarly Publishers, edited by Maria Bonn and Mike Furlough, published by the Association of College and Research Libraries.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Advocacy, connection, diversity.

4. What do you value about ACRL? In the fast changing world, academic libraries constantly face new challenges and struggle with the right directions to go. ACRL takes the responsibility to launch appropriate initiatives by collecting ideas from practitioners, analyzing experiences of pioneers, and putting together necessary resources to improve library services. It advocates an ongoing enhancement of the ability of librarians in support of teaching, learning, and research.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? As an MLS professor previously and a library administrator presently, I have been able to work closely with faculty, students, and academic staff to develop interactive programs. By establishing strategic goals and workable plans, I have been attempting to make our library an integrate part of our campus efforts that aim to increase the rates of student retention and graduation and collaborate with STEM educational exertions.

6. In your own words: While conducting research projects on the topic of open access, I have used ACRL as an important resource where I can keep abreast of novel developments, identify the new trends of scholarly communication, and participate in crucial activities. After coming to practice, I realize the excitements as well as difficulties of making an academic library academic. Librarians are information service providers, yet at the same time researchers themselves. Only if one is an “insider” will she or he be able to understand the essence of scholarship and education and then make the best contributions to science.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Yuimi Hlasten

Yuimi HlastenYuimi Hlasten is Japanese Cataloger at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. Yuimi has been an ACRL member since 2014 and is your ACRL member of the week for November 30, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Curious, humorous, adventurous.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I have Linked Data for Libraries, Archives, and Museums by Seth van Hooland and Ruben Verborgh, and the latest issue of Vogue on my bedroom table.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Energy, possibility, opportunity.

4. What do you value about ACRL? ACRL membership boosts my energy and confidence at work. It also gives me the opportunity to learn, expand my horizons, and network with experts in my field.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? I catalog Japanese materials for our libraries.

6. In your own words: There is a lot of writing in my current position. This writing includes project reports, meeting minutes, and proposals. Interestingly, writing is now more a part of my daily life than when I was taking classes in English as a Second Language! The difference now is that my husband, my boss, and my colleagues are my English teachers!


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: John Sandstrom

John SandstromJohn Sandstrom is Acquisitions Librarian at the New Mexico State University Library in Las Cruces, New Mexico. John has been an ACRL member since 2008 and is your ACRL member of the week for November 23, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Dedicated, over-booked, curious.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? As a doctorate in Educational Leadership and Administration, my current reading list is skewed from normal. Right now I’m reading Critical Race Theory: The Key Writings that Formed the Movement, edited by Crenshaw, et.al; Red Pedagogy: Native American Social and Political Thought by Sandy Grande; Social Justice in Education by Barry L. Bull; and Theory of Justice by John Rawls.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Open, informative, transformative.

4. What do you value about ACRL? What I value most about ACRL are the networking opportunities. Being able to join with others in our profession with the same, or at least related, concerns, values, and experiences is a great way to stay up-to-date and grow as an academic librarian.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? As the Acquisitions Librarian for a Tier 1 institution, I know that I contribute to all the research done on my campus by being the gateway between our researchers and the growing universe of information available through online tools and resources.

6. In your own words: As an academic librarian who has experience as both a public librarian and a vendor, I am familiar with the wide variety of experiences available in the field of librarianship. Unfortunately, this isn’t enough. Libraries of all types are finding themselves under attach. Out budgets are being reduced, our usefulness is being questioned, and our place is being questioned, not only in the academy but in society in general. Libraries have a critical role to play in society and academia but to make sure people remember that role; we need to be flexible in how we present ourselves and our services. Developing the skills to achieve this flexibility requires all librarians to move outside our comfort zones and to reach out to our constituents and meet them on their own ground intellectually, theoretically, and practically.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Lee Ann Fullington

Lee Ann FullingtonLee Ann Fullington is Health and Environmental Sciences Librarian at Brooklyn College, The City University of New York in Brooklyn, New York. Lee Ann has been an ACRL member since 2012 and is your ACRL member of the week for November 16, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Empathetic, open-minded, resilient.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? As far as books, I’m currently in a run of (re)reading underground fiction from the 1960s. I just started Herbert Simmons’ Man Walking on Eggshells and I just finished Clarence Cooper Jr.’s The Scene. If I’m in a podcast mood, Rupaul’s What’s the Tee? is my go-to. I’ve picked up lots of tips for instruction from RuPaul, believe it or not! My true listening love is music though–Thee Oh Sees, Spacemen 3, Spiritualized, Kurt Vile, and Ty Segall are on heavy rotation on the iPod lately, providing the soundtrack for my commute on the NYC subway.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Supportive, engaged colleagues.

4. What do you value about ACRL? ACRL as an organization fosters communality and encourages making connections that are not simply about professional development, but much, much deeper. As a new academic librarian, attending ACRL 2015 with the assistance of the Early Career Librarian Scholarship was a fantastic experience as it allowed me to meet so many inspiring librarians, and because of it, I connected with colleagues from all over North America. I value building relationships of all kinds with other librarians near and far: sharing ideas, practices, and even fandoms (there are a lot of us who are obsessed with baseball!). Thank you for your generosity, ACRL!

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? Supporting students is the most important part of my job as a librarian, so I do as much as I can to be available when they need me, and I tailor instruction to their particular courses. I am heavily involved with the Health and Nutrition Sciences department at Brooklyn College. As their liaison, I am in the process of developing targeted, scaffolded instruction across the arc of the Nutrition program, in order to be able to help the students develop their research and health information literacy skills at key, meaningful points in their program. Our students at Brooklyn College are often balancing full time jobs, families, long commutes, and other responsibilities to attend college, so as a librarian, I want to support them and provide useful services at times when the students are available, and to work with them on their terms.

6. In your own words: In my practice, I feel that being an academic librarian is all about partnership. Partnering with students on their research, as they have the subject expertise and we have the search expertise. Partnering with faculty to help students develop research and critical thinking skills and prepare them for professional life after college. Partnering with fellow librarians to create and deliver amazing outreach programs. Partnering with colleagues to provide well-rounded reference assistance. Partnering with colleagues near and far on research projects to keep improving services or to uncover and address new findings. Taking time to reflect on my own practices is essential to cultivating these myriad partnerships, so I spend a lot of time considering how I can better support students, faculty, and colleagues, as well as show how grateful I am to everyone who supports me and helps me grow as a librarian.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

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