Category Archives: Member of the Week

Member of the Week: Melissa Ringle

Melissa RingleMelissa Ringle is Curriculum Coordinator/Library and Learning Resources at Northwest Allen County Schools in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Melissa has been an ACRL member since 2014,  is an ALA 2015 Emerging Leader and your ACRL member of the week for April 20, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Adventurous, energetic, and ambitious.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device(s)? The Book of Life by Deborah Harkness; Walter Cronkite: His Life & Times by Doug James; and the current issue of Rolling Stone.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Knowledgeable, inspiring, and insightful.

4. What do you value about ACRL? ACRL is an invaluable resource–it provides insight and guidance from seasoned veterans, impactful and meaningful research, abundances of knowledge and inspiration that renews my spirit and love of the library and informatics profession.

5. What do you as an academic librarian contribute to your campus? In August, I left my position as an Instructional/Reference Librarian at Indiana Tech to pursue a new adventure as the Curriculum Coordinator/Library and Learning Resources for Northwest Allen County Schools. It was a unique opportunity to nurture exploration and excellences in information literacy, critical thinking, and lifelong learning skills with 21st century learners in a K-12 environment. As an academic librarian, I am passionate about developing the skill sets students need to succeed in and outside of the classroom. My current position allows me to collaborate with faculty and staff to bridge the gap between information literacy skill development and information literacy skill expectations for college and the workforce, establishing a learning commons that supports course curriculum, promotes reading for enrichment, fosters lifelong learning and reinforces college and career readiness for students based on pedagogical innovation and best practices.

6. In your own words: As academic librarians, we have a vital role in the integration of information literacy across curriculum, and the strategic implementation of emerging technology into classrooms. It’s important that we make our voices heard.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Elizabeth Caris at ecaris@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Eric Resnis

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Eric Resnis is both Assessment Coordinator in the Center for Teaching, Learning, and University Assessment and Organizational Effectiveness Specialist in the Libraries at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. Eric is a new Assessment in Action (AiA) Facilitator and is your ACRL member of the week for April 13, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Resourceful, diligent, and pragmatic.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device(s)? I just finished reading Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson. I am now reading Insurgent by Veronica Roth in preparation for a meeting of our Second Year Student Book Club.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Relevant, supportive, and engaging.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I not only enjoy the ability to collaborate with colleagues on work that is of value to academic librarians, I also greatly appreciate the opportunities for professional growth.

5. What do you as an academic librarian contribute to your campus? Currently, I am working to further inform the campus community of our Library’s contributions to student learning, stakeholder engagement, and university strategic goals. As I currently have a dual appointment in the Libraries and in our Center for Teaching Excellence, I get the opportunity to not only view, but shape assessment from multiple perspectives within the University. My years of helping faculty to value information literacy have proved invaluable as I assist faculty in understanding and implementing full-cycle programmatic assessment.

6. In your own words: In my years as a librarian, change has been an ever constant force, and I have enjoyed evolving and adapting to new challenges and opportunities. My interests with librarianship and higher education have also changed over the years, and I appreciate that I have been able to explore and expand in different areas. Although I have been in the profession for over 10 years, every day continues to provide new and different opportunities, which is one of the primary reasons I decided on this career so long ago.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Elizabeth Caris at ecaris@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Leah Hannaford

Leah HannafordLeah Hannaford is Open Education Librarian at Centralia College in Centralia, Washington. Leah has been an ACRL member since 2014 and is your ACRL member of the week for April 6, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Ambitious, caring, and energetic.

2. What are you currently reading (or listening to on your mobile devices)? I am currently reading Mindy Kaling’s book Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? as I am a huge Mindy fan. Her book has encouraged me to have less guilt about my cheese intake and to not second guess my use of the Oxford comma.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Engaging, community, and committed.

4. What do you value about ACRL? As a new academic librarian I have greatly benefited from ACRL because I have a strong community as a starting point when I need more information on specific aspects of my job. I love reading about the different members and how all of our unique perspectives come together with the purpose of assisting our patrons.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? I am the Open Education Librarian here at Centralia. I think the best part of my job is being able to assist faculty members with retooling their research or current courses to be openly accessible to our students and colleagues. I organize workshops, plan events around open education, and brainstorm with our incredible e-Learning department ways to involve our students in the open education discussion that we’re starting here on campus (which this year includes a Star Wars themed display of “The Open Education Discussion.”) Open Education is more than “free textbooks,” it encompasses the re-use of created content in multiple ways which means that I have to get creative with data compatibility options and build our repository in a way that reflects this purpose.

6. In your own words: While on deployment in Kenya I was found by a librarian who had taken notice of how I was organizing informational products and people. After watching me operate my information center for several days she finally stated, “You’re a librarian. You just don’t know it yet,” and handed me a stack of ALA magazines. Two days later I knew I had found my ultimate profession. Two weeks after that moment I applied to Florida State University’s MLIS program and was on my way. I spent my remaining years in the United States Army as a librarian without a library which taught me how to locate resources without the benefit of a home institution. I learned the importance of open access as it applies to more than just patrons in an academic setting.

It has been an amazing experience to be able to ground myself with a home institution and help so many faculty members with their intellectual endeavors. Every day I get a new opportunity to help someone solve a complex data problem or organize materials in a way that benefits our patrons. I get to be a part of growing the open access conversation from a grassroots level. A librarian is who I’ve always been . . . now I get to do it in an actual library.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Elizabeth Caris at ecaris@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Jamie N. Smith

Jamie N. SmithJamie N. Smith is Metadata and Catalog Librarian in the Gallaudet University Deaf Collections and Archives in Washington, DC. Jamie has been an ACRL member since 2013, is a 2015 ALA Emerging Leader, and your ACRL member of the week for March 30, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Compassionate, hardworking, and collaborative.

2. What are you currently reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I am reading Finding Zoe by Brandi Rarus. It is a true story about a Deaf woman and her journey in adopting a Deaf baby girl named Zoe.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Resourceful. Innovative. Progressive.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I definitely value the opportunities to connect with other professionals. 

5. What do you as an academic librarian contribute to your campus? I work as the Metadata and Catalog Librarian at Gallaudet University, which proudly serves Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Hearing students in Washington, DC. I create and manage metadata, catalog deaf-related materials, manage and develop the collections, assist with scanning and digitizing our growing digital collections, and provide reference in the Archives.

6. In your own words: Being an academic librarian at Gallaudet University is rewarding. Aside from the work on campus, I also get to travel to different colleges and universities in the Washington, DC-area consortium. I work with other librarians in several committees including metadata, digital practices, preservation, and special collections and archives.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Derrick Jefferson

Derrick JeffersonDerrick Jefferson is Communication Librarian at American University in Washington, DC. Derrick has been an ACRL member since 2012, is a 2015 ALA Emerging Leader, and your ACRL member of the week for March 23, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Open, humorous, committed.

2. What are you currently reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I go back every few years to Michael Ondaatje’s pre-English Patient works: Coming Through Slaughter and The Collected Works of Billy the Kid. I find his unique mashup of poetry, prose, myth, and storytelling to be utterly fascinating.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Connected, purposeful, engaged.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I feel like ACRL has provided a warm and embracing home for me. As a library school student, I dipped my toes in many pools trying to learn as much as I could about the profession, and as an academic librarian interested in how to be a better instructor, how to do better assessment, it has really affected how I go about conducting and refining my work in the library. ACRL really laid the groundwork for me through their publications, meeting other members, etc. The newsletter is great for highlighting the work of my fellow librarians and keeping me informed on current dealings and topics.

5. What do you as an academic librarian contribute to your campus? People are our livelihood. I go out of my way, and out of the library to engage our campus community. Our demographics have changed, I work with many working professionals, graduate students, veterans, online/distance students and an increasingly diverse student population here at American University. Libraries have changed from what many of these students are used to. I hope to keep our patrons informed on what it is libraries and librarians can do for them and their research, study, and and collection needs.

6. In your own words: I wake up every morning with a smile on my face and am often one of the first people in the office. I love what I do, and being able to share my skill set to help others level up on their research is a pretty significant gift. With that, I’m still learning! Having a network of colleagues who can share their experiences and knowledge is huge in helping me help others.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

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