Category Archives: Member of the Week

Member of the Week: Elizabeth Galoozis

Elizabeth GaloozisElizabeth Galoozis is Information Literacy and Educational Technology Librarian at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. Elizabeth has been an ACRL member since 2012 and is your ACRL member of the week for August 31, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Reflective, methodical, pragmatic.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device(s)? I just raced my way through Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng, and now I’m reading Gay L.A.: A History of Sexual Outlaws, Power Politics, & Lipstick Lesbians by Lillian Faderman and Stuart Timmons. (I love a good subtitle.) I’m also reading Saga by Brian K. Vaughan as each issue comes out, and trying to keep up with Poetry and The Atlantic.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Connection, support, learning.

4. What do you value about ACRL? The conference is by far my favorite conference – there’s always so much programming that interests me, the keynote speakers are creative, and it’s the perfect size. I also value the in-depth professional experiences ACRL offers, like Immersion and Assessment in Action. Participating in Immersion in 2012 was a real turning point in my thinking and professional development. I appreciate that ACRL’s members are always challenging ourselves to improve, and not rest on the progress we’ve already made.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? As an Information Literacy and Educational Technology Librarian, I consider my central contribution to be making connections: for disciplinary faculty between their learning goals and information literacy; for students with other perspectives and ways of thinking; and for librarians with information literacy across the university and across our large library system. More specifically, I work with our General Education curriculum, graduate student and faculty orientation, and the libraries’ reference working group, and I’m the subject librarian for linguistics and comparative literature.

6. In your own words: I became an academic librarian because I love and value inquiry and critical thinking, and I didn’t feel like that passion was (for me) contained in any one discipline. I don’t think I would have said it in those words back when I applied to library school, but I did have a sense I would be happier participating in a wide range of learning and research experiences rather than devoting myself to a narrower field of study. I’m happiest when I’m working closely with faculty and students to explore their passions and interests.

Another reason I became, and love being, a librarian was articulated recently by my colleague Callie Wiygul, who said that she often asks herself: “How is what I’m doing helping people?” I’ve used this thought many times since then as a way to re-focus, to help me to prioritize work, and to consider the impact of both small- and large-scale efforts.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Greg Carr

Greg CarrGreg Carr is Undergraduate Learning Librarian at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas. Greg has been an ACRL member since 2013 and is your ACRL member of the week for August 24, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Passionate, funny, and realistic.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device(s)? Reading: Dark Places by Gillian Flynn and Listening: How Did This Get Made? podcast.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Motivating, colleagues, essential.

4. What do you value about ACRL? The opportunities that have been provided for me to engage with my field and colleagues in many important ways. Everything I do, teaching, research and service, have all been improved by my interactions with ACRL.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? In addition to a lot of time in the classroom, I assist professors with improving the design of their research assignments. I also coordinate the library instruction for the STEM and Urban Affairs first year seminars.

6. In your own words: Right now is an amazing time to be in this quickly evolving field. There are as many definitions of librarian as there are librarians.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Michael Ellis

Michael EllisMichael Ellis is Access Services/Reference Librarian at Hanover College in Hanover, Indiana. Michael has been an ACRL member since 2010 and is your ACRL member of the week for August 17, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Intelligent, inquisitive, and persistent.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device(s)? I am currently reading The Confederacy’s Last Hurrah: Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville by Wiley Sword and The Oklahoma Land Rush of 1889 by Stan Hoig for a genealogy project I am working on concerning my third great-grandfather, Enos Ellis. Enos served in Company A, Third Indiana Cavalry and Company D, Tenth Indiana Cavalry during the Civil War and was an 89er; that is, he was a participant in the Oklahoma Territory Land Run of 1889. The more I learn about Enos the more I admire his perseverance, resilience, and determination.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Proactive, supportive, and indispensable.

4. What do you value about ACRL? There are three things in particular I highly value about ACRL:

1. The security and support I receive as a professional academic librarian.
2. The wealth of knowledge I gain from reading College & Research Libraries and College & Research Libraries News.
3. The camaraderie of my fellow ACRL members.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? As the Access Services librarian in the Agnes Brown Duggan Library at Hanover College, I have made it my mission to provide efficient, effective, and innovative access to scholarly resources and materials to the Hanover College community and visiting scholars in pursuit of excellence in teaching, research, knowledge, and scholarship. I do my best to accomplish this mission daily.

6. In your own words: Before beginning my career as an academic librarian I had tried my hands at various other professions, from farming to working as a professional photographer. Looking back, I would have to state that being an academic librarian has been one of the most challenging, rewarding, and fulfilling careers for me. I find it particularly rewarding when a student I have helped at the reference desk comes back to let me know that she or he has done well on an academic project I have assisted them with.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Nancy Kranich

Nancy KranichNancy Kranich is special projects librarian at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Nancy has been an ACRL member since 1986 and is the recipient of the 2015 American Library Association Ken Haycock Award for Promoting Librarianship. She is your ACRL member of the week for August 10, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Passionate, tireless, and connector.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device(s)? Richard Harwood’s “Putting Community into Collective Impact,” (Collective Impact Forum and the Harwood Institute for Public Innovation, 2015) and David Mathews’ The Ecology of Democracy: Finding Ways to Have a Stronger Hand in Shaping Our Future (Dayton, OH: Kettering Foundation, 2014)Note: The Kettering Foundation is giving free copies of this book to libraries using it for book discussions and professors using it in class. A web site at http://ecologyofdemocracy.org/ offers questions for libraries to lead conversations on this topic.   

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Networking, advancement, and empowerment.

4. What do you value about ACRL? ACRL is a community of practice that engages members and shares their journeys.  It is the place we come together to shape our collective future and build the capacity to move forward in a tumultuous but exciting time of change.  It is our home away in our international professional village.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? As special projects librarian at Rutgers University, I bring my training as a “public innovator” through the Harwood Institute to help colleagues engage more deeply with the Rutgers community. Together, we map strategies for our libraries to turn outward as they strengthen campus relationships and transform the way the RU Libraries engage with the campus community. These efforts highlight the value of engaging in conversations that build public knowledge and community, in order to position the library within the broader discourse of the academy. What is apparent from these conversations is that the libraries have the power to bring people together in the community. Through our efforts, we are increasingly recognized as facilitators of conversations and catalysts for positive change on campus, as well as trusted partners in the educational enterprise.

6. In your own words: Librarianship is about limitless possibilities. As academic and research librarians, we bring the potential to shape a better and more inclusive future for students and scholars.  Today is the perfect moment for us to carve out new territory, build community, lead change, and deepen engagement across our universities. When we turn outward and act intentionally, we reposition our libraries from repositories to strategic university assets. In doing so, we tap into the potential of leading our campuses during a chaotic time.  Throughout a career committed to academic libraries and to education in LIS programs, I have rejoiced as we empower a diverse array of young people to engage, connect, learn, and grow.  Today’s academic libraries–no longer a destination but a transformational journey—contribute one of the fundamental elements that enable higher education to create a future for our institutions and society.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Robert Seal

Bob SealBob Seal is Dean of Libraries at Loyola University Chicago. Bob has been an ACRL member since 1986 and was awarded the 2015 ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year Award. He is your ACRL member of the week for August 3, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Dedicated, focused, and caring.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device(s)? A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Professional, supportive, and opportunities.

4. What do you value about ACRL? The focus on the needs of academic libraries and librarians, including the work the Association does to promote standards (for example, standards for information literacy).

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? Articulating the needs of the library in support of all phases of the academic enterprise. Also, providing leadership that emphasizes putting users first. I am proud of our staff at Loyola University Chicago for exhibiting such an outstanding service orientation. Our unofficial motto is “Our students and faculty are not an interruption; they are our reason for being here.”

6. In your own words: Although I intended to be a special librarian (I majored in astronomy as an undergraduate), I ended up at the University of Virginia as circulation librarian, a move that turned out to be a great first step towards becoming a library administrator. To this day, I feel fortunate to work in an academic library, to work and interact with students and faculty doing so many interesting things. The university environment is stimulating and exciting, and I am fortunate to have been part of it for some 40-plus years.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

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