Category Archives: Member of the Week

Member of the Week: Xiaoyu Duan

Xiaoyu DuanXiaoyu Duan is Humanities Cataloger at the University of Oklahoma Libraries in Norman, Oklahoma. Xiaoyu has been an ACRL member since 2014, is a 2015 ALA Emerging Leader, and your ACRL member of the week for January 26, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Enthusiastic, creative, sincere.

2. What are you currently reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I read novels, journals, and academic papers on my Xoom pad, and I use my mobile phone to listen to music and streaming radio.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Academic, active, diverse.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I value the opportunities and platforms ACRL provides for academic librarians for professional development, and I also value the information and trainings offered by ACRL to help new librarians become leaders in their profession.

5. What do you as an academic librarian contribute to your campus? I work as the humanities cataloger for my university libraries. By providing metadata records for the library resources, faculty, staff and students are able to search and use these resources from our library discovery service for their studies, research, and instruction.

6. In your own words: For me, to be an academic librarian is to be a person who opens the gates for faculty, staff, and students to access academic resources. Academic librarians also work with faculty, staff, and students to offer assistance during their research process. This is in support of the institution’s missions and goals.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Jeanne Drewes

Jeanne DrewesJeanne Drewes is Chief of the Binding and Collections Care Division/ Deacidification Program at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. Jeanne has been an ACRL member since 2010, and is your ACRL member of the week for January 19, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Energetic, dedicated, focused.

2. What are you currently reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I love Rasputina and Kaki King. I am reading a number of books: Tom Vick’s Asian Cinema; John Unkau’s Looking at Architecture with Ruskin; and Janet and Laura Greenwald’s Get Your Stuff Together, which is a very useful book to help avoid disastrous loss in a disaster. I am also reading Elephant Rocks, by Kay Ryan, former Poet Laureate. I always carry with me one of the ALA publications – C&RL, College and Research Libraries News, or American Libraries – because I can read articles during down time such as standing in line, or on the Metro and then do follow up from those articles when I get to work.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Connecting, informing, professional.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I value the programming and the publications, but most importantly I value the forum ACRL provides to connect with professionals and exchange ideas, solutions, and visions relating to our field.

5. What do you as a preservationist contribute to the higher education community? I use new technology to preserve and make accessible information, in many forms, for students, educators, researchers and future generations of scholars. One of the most interesting technologies to me is the ability to share the research and public programs we offer here, through webinars and videoconferencing to broadcast the preservation knowledge here at the Library of Congress. Our programs are often available even after the date by going to the website.

6. In your own words: My job is particularly satisfying because it enables me to interact with people from a wide-range of cultural institutions – libraries, archives, and museums. I use my knowledge and experience to help people preserve their treasures – those things that hold the memories of a culture or of a lifetime – for use, study or old-fashioned reminiscence by people who come after me. My day job is preserving the unmatched collections at the Library of Congress, so that those materials will last for future generations but my avocation is preserving family/individual collections such as family photographs or love letters from grandparents, or whatever holds memories. Also, when I have the luxury of unscheduled time, I enjoy hand book binding.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Rebecka Embry

Rebecka EmbryRebecka Embry is Library Director at the University of Arkansas Community College at Morrilton E. Allen Gordon Library in Morrilton, Arkansas. Rebecka has been an ACRL member since 2014, is a 2015 ALA Emerging Leader, and your ACRL member of the week for January 12, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Literate. Practical. Sweet.

2. What are you currently reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? Emily Post’s Wedding Etiquette, 6th edition. I’m getting married in June 2015! {Editor’s note: Congratulations!!}

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Educator. Connector. Helper.

4. What do you value about ACRL? It is the practical advice that ACRL provides academic librarians that I find the most valuable. I’ll have an idea for a library project or I’ll read about something another library is doing, but I need more information before figuring out if the project would work for our students. I can go to ACRL and read about the steps another library went through to implement a similar project and the struggles they experienced.

5. What do you as an academic librarian contribute to your campus? I have become enamored with the community college environment over the past two years. At UACCM, I have expanded what services our library can offer based on the needs of the students. Right now we are seeing success with providing students access to learning models that give hands on experience. By providing models in the library, students have convenient access that fits their study needs. I started out with human anatomy and physiology models, and I am in the process of expanding what we offer to include models that assist students in our technical degree fields.

6. In your own words: When it comes to the library I manage, no services are off limits to evaluation and change. I think about this often when I walk through my library and look at how the students are using the space. “That’s how it’s always been done” gets thrown out the window. Databases that are underutilized get reevaluated. As the degree programs and instructors on the campus have changed, so have how the students use our resources. We should be able to reconsider library services to make sure they are still effective and useful for our students without certain services being off limits.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Madeleine Charney

Madeleine CharneyMadeleine Charney is Sustainability Studies Librarian at the University of Massachusetts Amherst W.E.B. Du Bois Library in Amherst, Mass. Madeleine has been an ACRL member since 2012 and is your ACRL member of the week for January 5, 2015.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Energetic, out-of-the-box, inquisitive.

2. What are you currently reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? A favorite genre of mine is the modern autobiography. Two that I read recently were Yes, Chef! by Top Chef alum Marcus Samuelsson and Natural Woman by musician Carole King. I am fascinated and inspired by the struggles and triumphs of talented individuals who often battle great odds to achieve their best.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Forward-thinking, supportive, thought provoking.

4. What do you value about ACRL? The myriad professional development opportunities, both online and in person at conferences.

5. What do you as an academic librarian contribute to your campus? UMass Amherst has a rapidly growing body of sustainability courses and programs for which I’ve become the main point person in our libraries. I play an active role in organizing professional development opportunities for faculty teaching sustainability across disciplines. My participation reminders others of the library’s vital resources and services that support these programs and the students, our future leaders, who will work toward building a more resilient society.

6. In your own words: The part of my job I love most is the one-hour consultation with a student, professor, or community member. This allows me to listen deeply to their ideas and information needs. I sometimes refer to myself, but only half-jokingly, as an “information therapist.” In our fast-paced, DIY culture, I believe this kind of personalized, focused attention is appreciated and needed more than ever.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Member of the Week: Christian Dupont

Christian Dupont

Christian Dupont is Burns Librarian and Associate University Librarian for Special Collections at the Boston College John J. Burns Library in Chestnut Hill, Mass. Christian has been an ACRL member since 1998 and is your ACRL member of the week for December 15, 2014.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Philosophical. Adventuresome. Protean.

2. What are you currently reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? For pleasure reading, I’m constantly taking advantage of free moments while my hands are busy to tune into my LibriVox and Audible downloads. In anticipation of my new position at BC, I’ve spent the last few weeks discovering Graham Greene (we have his personal library and papers at the Burns). I started with The End of the Affair and am now deep into The Heart of the Matter, having bitten off Brighton Rock in between.

I’ve also been reacquainting myself with Jesuit spirituality under the direction of James Martin, SJ, who has in turn led me back to Thomas Merton and his Seven Storey Mountain. All roads always lead me home to Dante, my constant companion now in every stage of our life’s journey (I was appointed Secretary and Librarian of the Dante Society of America this past spring). With my teenage daughter as a highway companion on a recent drive back to Virginia, we chased down several short stories from Mark Parent’s Secret Society of Demolition Writers anthology while doing our best to avoid collisions of our own (don’t tell mom!).

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Revitalizing. Resourceful. Resource-full.

4. What do you value about ACRL? In truth, everything—beginning with the opportunities to connect and collaborate with colleagues who share similar commitments to improving academic libraries and increasing their relevance and value in our rapidly evolving educational, social, and technological environments. Over the years, through various leadership roles in RBMS (my section home) and the larger organization, I have also enjoyed opportunities to work closely with almost all of the ACRL staff, who continually inspire me with their dedication, professionalism, and vitality.

5. What do you as an academic librarian contribute to your campus? Well, that remains to be seen! I just recently started in my new role at Boston College. As associate university librarian for special collections, my primary aim will to be work with my eager staff in the Burns Library to engage an ever-growing proportion of our students and faculty with our unique collection resources and, beyond our local sphere, the larger scholarly world and global public. Because our collection strengths align strongly with BC’s Jesuit, Catholic character and mission, our goal is to become an ever more vital resource and node of BC’s intellectual and cultural life. Burns Library has had especially strong ties with BC’s Center for Irish Programs through our Irish Music Center and distinguished annual visiting scholar program. I look forward to further enhancing those alliances and cultivating relationships with many other academic departments and programs.

6. In your own words: Six years ago, while I was director of special collections at UVa, I decided to jump the rails and join Atlas Systems, the library software development company best known for creating the ILLiad interlibrary loan management system, to lead the development and promotion of Aeon, the first online user and request management system designed specifically for special collections and archives. Leveraging network and database technologies to liberate rare books and manuscripts proved liberating for me as well, both personally and professionally. And yet at times I felt that having a .com instead of a .edu or .org at the end of my email address limited librarians’ perceptions of me as a partner who was equally invested in the success of our shared enterprise. I like to think that I became good at working past the “vendor” image, and now that I have reassumed the outward signs of my identity as an academic librarian, I like to think that I will be good at helping my library colleagues think about possibilities for partnerships outside the library in fresh and creative ways.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

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