Category Archives: Information Literacy

ACRL announces 2015 Immersion Programs

ACRL announces its 2015 Information Literacy Immersion Programs.  The ACRL Immersion Programs provide instruction librarians the opportunity to work intensively on all aspects of information literacy.

Practical Management TrackMarch 25, 2015, Portland, OR
Deadline to register: February 6, 2015
http://www.ala.org/acrl/immersion/practicalmanagement

Registration materials are now available for the Immersion Management Track: Practical Management for the Instruction Coordinator.  The Immersion ’15 Practical Management track will be held in conjunction with the ACRL 2015 Conference in Portland on March 25, 2015.  The registration deadline is February 6, 2015. The Practical Management Track will address how to lead from within – developing the powers of persuasion to influence in multiple directions.  Other topics include creating the right environment for a successful instruction program, understanding a broader campus environment, providing constructive feedback, and coaching for success.  Discover how to influence in multiple directions in order to achieve programmatic goals and develop a succinct proposal for administrative consideration.

Teacher and Program TracksAugust 2-7, 2015, Seattle, WA
Deadline to apply: December 5, 2014
http://www.ala.org/acrl/immersionprogram

ACRL is currently accepting applications for the Immersion ’15 Program (Teacher and Program tracks) to be held at Seattle University in Seattle, August 2-7, 2015.  Acceptance to Immersion ’15 is competitive to ensure an environment that fosters group interaction and active participation.  Applications are due December 5, 2014. Teacher Track focuses on individual development for those who are interested in refreshing, enhancing, or extending their individual instruction skills. Curriculum includes classroom techniques, learning theory, leadership, and assessment framed in the context of information literacy. Program Track focuses on developing, integrating, and managing institutional and programmatic information literacy programs.  Change dynamics, systems thinking, institutional outcomes assessment, scalability, and the integration of teaching, learning, and technology will be brought to bear on analyzing the various programmatic challenges presented in case studies developed prior to the program.

Questions about ACRL Immersion ’15 programs should be directed to Margot Conahan at mconahan@ala.org.

Next Steps for Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy

Editor’s Note: In this post, Joyce L. Ogburn, Chair of ACRL’s Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy Task Force, provides an update on Task Force activities.

In 2013, ACRL issued two major publications that integrate two strong ACRL programs – information literacy and scholarly communication. The first publication to be issued was a white paper that articulated salient issues and potential connections between these two areas. [1] Close on its heels, ACRL published an open access book with contributed chapters that explored many different crossovers and intersections. [2]

In 2014, the ACRL Board appointed a task force to continue the efforts. Specifically, the task force was charged with “monitoring and responding to reactions to the white paper and use of the white paper, as well as proposing and delivering sustainable professional development opportunities building on the ideas and recommendations in the white paper.” We began our work at the ALA Midwinter Meeting, and this column summarizes our work to date.

  • Three members of the task force, along with ACRL Executive Director Mary Ellen Davis, gave a project briefing at the April 2014 CNI meeting. The discussion elicited new arenas for librarians to explore: e-portfolios; accessibility issues; undergraduate research; digital citizenship; digital identity and security of personal information; student services; and campus IT.  We encourage you to consider how these suggestions might play out on your campus. [3]
  • Three members of the task force published an article in the September 2014 issue of C&RL News addressing the work of the task force and how their libraries are applying emerging concepts. Take a look at what each is doing. [4]
  • The task force is contributing to ACRL’s new initiative on data management by addressing the concept of data literacy. A section on data literacy, with text drawn from the white paper, was added as a resources link in the Scholarly Communication Toolkit data management tab. [5]
  • We will be offering webinars with such topics as including scholarly communication with information literacy in job descriptions and expectations for librarians. Be watching for announcements.
  • A panel session at the ACRL 2015 Conference in Portland, Oregon, will engage attendees in dialogue to inform the final report, which is due to the board before the 2015 ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco. Please come join the conversation.

There are more activities in the planning stages. We want to hear from members who are using the white paper, perhaps as a guide to incorporating new topics into information literacy instruction, embedding information in research guides, developing targeted workshops for new services such as open access publishing or managing intellectual property rights, or working in new ways with partners on campus. We encourage you to add your ideas and activities in the comments section of this posting.

Task Force Members: Jeff Belliston, Barbara DeFelice, Mel Desart, Terri Fishel, Julia Gelfand, Merinda Kaye Hensley, Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Joyce Ogburn, Kevin Smith, Jean Zanoni, Kara Malenfant (ACRL Staff Liaison)

Resources Cited:

1. ACRL (2013). Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy: Creating Strategic Collaborations for a Changing Academic Environment. Chicago: ACRL. http://acrl.ala.org/intersections/.

2. Stephanie Davis-Kahl and Merinda Kaye Hensley, eds. (2013). Common Ground at the Nexus of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication. ChicagoACRL.
http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/publications/booksanddigitalresources/digital/commonground_oa.pdf.

3. Mary Ellen Davis, Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Merinda Kaye Hensley, and Joyce L. Ogburn (2014). “Enriching How We Teach and Learn:  The Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy.” Project Briefing, CNI April 1, 2014. http://www.cni.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/tuesday_ogburn_acrl_-enriching.pdf.

4. Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Teresa A. Fishel, and Merinda Kaye Hensley (2014). “Weaving the Threads of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy into Academic Librarian Roles.” C&RL News, September: 441- 444. http://crln.acrl.org/content/75/8/441.full.pdf+html.

5. Data Literacy Essay (2014). ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit. http://acrl.ala.org/scholcomm/?page_id=330.

- Joyce L. Ogburn, Chair, Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy Task Force

Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education Progressing; Third Draft for Comment Expected November 1

small_bannerMembers of ACRL’s Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force are hard at work analyzing all the feedback to the June 17 revised draft Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. The Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, adopted by ACRL in 2000, has become an essential document related to the emergence of information literacy as a recognized learning outcome at many institutions of higher education. These, like all ACRL standards, are reviewed cyclically and a task force charged with creating the Framework has been working since March 2013. They are carefully reviewing responses provided to the revised draft Framework this summer through the questionnaire, in person and online forums, social media outlets, and personal communications to Task Force members.

The responses from the community have provided sufficient ideas that the task force will spend additional time revising the document. They expect the revisions to be substantive enough to warrant an additional period of review by ACRL members and the community before sending to the ACRL Board of Directors for a vote. Therefore the task force will extend their timeline, as the Board offered during its June 28 meeting. (See the August 13 information memo from the task force co-chairs to the Board.)

At this point, the task force tentatively plans to release a third draft for comment on November 1, 2014. They would submit a final Framework and recommendations to the ACRL Board of Directors by early January 2015 for a vote at the 2015 ALA Midwinter Meeting.

As they continue to carefully consider all feedback they have received, task force members will continue to address recurring questions/concerns via the Frequently Asked Question section of their website. Expect new content to be added there in the weeks ahead.

Upcoming ACRL webcast – Cultivating Creators: Copyright in the Information Literacy Classroom

Cultivating Creators: Copyright in the Information Literacy Classroom
ACRL e-Learning Webcast

August 5, 2014
11 a.m. Pacific | 12:00 p.m. Mountain | 1:00 p.m. Central | 2:00 p.m. Eastern

90 minutes

Description: Information literacy and scholarly communication librarians are working together to create avenues for increased collaboration in the classroom. The Framework for Information Literacy and the Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy white paper, plus continuing task force work within ACRL, demonstrates progress towards aligning scholarly communication education within undergraduate and graduate student information literacy outreach. This webcast will focus on how librarians can integrate copyright into the classroom with undergraduate and graduate students to raise awareness of not only ethically using others’ work, but also how to consider their rights and responsibilities as creators and copyright holders of their own work.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Share strategies for discussing copyright with students in order to build instructional literacy for librarians.
  • Contextualize copyright and Creative Commons licenses within information literacy instruction in order to increase professional knowledge about scholarly communication.
  • Raise awareness of different options for sharing scholarship and creative activity among librarians in order to close the loop in information literacy instruction.

Presenter(s): Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Scholarly Communications Librarian/Associate Professor, Illinois Wesleyan University; Molly Keener, Scholarly Communication Librarian, Wake Forest University

Complete details and registration materials are online at http://www.ala.org/acrl/copyrightinclassroom.

If you have a question about an e-Learning opportunity or need technical assistance, please contact Margot Conahan (mconahan@ala.org).

FAQs on IL Framework available; Reminder: online hearings July 7 and 11, comments due July 15

small_bannerMembers of the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force are grateful for all the robust input gathered through online feedback forms, member forums and hearings (face-to-face and online), member emails, conversations in social media, as well as comments from the ACRL Board of Directors. The Task Force takes the feedback provided by members seriously, and has used this feedback to guide and improve their process. They have been listening to all of your comments and incorporating much of the feedback into the latest, revised draft. As they continue to carefully consider all the new input they receive, task force members recognize some questions/concerns are recurring and have addressed those in a new Frequently Asked Question section of their website.

They are eager to hear more from you about their latest, revised draft. Please be sure to please share your thoughts if you haven’t already done so. Sign up to participate in one of the online hearings being held Monday, July 7, at 1pm Central and Friday, July 11, at 10am Central. Provide your written feedback by Tuesday, July 15, 2014, 5pm Central, via the online form. To help guide your thinking, the task force asks that you consider these questions:

  1. How satisfied are you with the overall Framework?
  2. If you have followed the development of the Framework through the previous draft, please tell us what changes you find most helpful.
  3. Does the “Suggestions on How to Use the Information Literacy Framework” section, in conjunction with the Frames, help you to engage other campus stakeholders in conversation?
  4. How might the Framework affect the way you work with students?
  5. What one thing do you most want the Task Force members to know about the draft Framework?

While the task force asks that you send reactions via the online form (so it is easier to compile comments and ensure no emails have gone astray) the co-chairs are also happy to connect with you on a personal level. You should feel free to be in touch with them to discuss your reactions to the draft and can reach them as follows: Craig Gibson, Head, Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences Library, Ohio State University Libraries, gibson.721@osu.edu; and Trudi E. Jacobson, Head, Information Literacy Department, University at Albany, SUNY, University Libraries, tjacobson@albany.edu.

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