Category Archives: eLearning

ACRL Presents – Celebrating Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week, “Using Fair Use to Preserve and Share Disappearing Government Information” (2/21)

Fair Use Fair Dealing Week LogoJoin us for the free ACRL Presents webcast, “Using Fair Use to Preserve and Share Disappearing Government Information: A Guide for Rogue Librarians” on Tuesday, February 21, 2017, from 1:00 — 2:00 p.m. Central time (11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Pacific | 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Mountain | 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Central | 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. Eastern.  Convert additional time zones online.)

Fair use plays a crucial role as copyright’s safety valve for free expression because it permits unauthorized copying in service of the public good. This role, which enables everything from scathing reviews of artwork to wholesale digitization of books for accessibility, is taking on new currency as librarians scramble to preserve contested government information online. From deleted climate data, disappearing government web pages, and ephemeral political tweets, fair use cuts through the legal confusion so we can maintain the historical and scientific record. This webinar will introduce fair use as an equitable doctrine designed to support librarianship and prepare participants to apply fair use in their own communities’ work.

Learning outcomes:

  • Understand the fundamentals of fair use as an equitable doctrine that permits use of copyrighted materials for the public good.
  • Understand the copyright issues surrounding government information and the effects of sharing materials posted on different platforms such as .gov sites and social media platforms like Twitter.
  • Apply fair use in their own practice preserving and sharing digital government documents in their own communities.

Presenters: William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center in the North Carolina State University Libraries. He speaks and writes nationally on copyright, scholarly communication, and open culture. He is also a presenter for the ACRL workshop and a presenter for the ACRL workshop, Scholarly Communication: From Understanding to Engagement. Read more about Will in his ACRL member of the week profile.

Lillian Rigling is a North Carolina State University Libraries Fellow, working in the Copyright & Digital Scholarship Center and the User Experience Department. She coordinates outreach, instruction, and engagement around issues of author’s rights, copyright, and open culture at NCSU for students and faculty. Previously, she worked as a Graduate Assistant in the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office at the University of Toronto.

How to register:
Submit your free registration online by February 17, 2017.  Login details will be sent via email the afternoon of February 17.  The webcast will be recorded and made available shortly after the live event.

Questions should be directed to mconahan@ala.org.  More details about Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week, February 20-24, 2017, are available online.

February e-Learning webcasts

February may be the shortest month of the year but there’s plenty of opportunity to squeeze in some online learning.  ACRL is offering the following e-Learning webcasts to meet the demands of your schedule and budget.

Modern Pathfinders: Easy Techniques to Make Better Research Guides (February 2, 2017)
Librarians put many hours into creating research guides, and usage studies have shown that students use them very little. Learn some effective techniques of instructional design and web usability that any librarian can apply to make online guides better and more useful to your students, whether you’re using LibGuides or a home-brew system.

Charting a New Course for Credit-Bearing Information Literacy Courses in Higher Education (February 22, 2017)
Librarians often see “instructor” added to their growing list of responsibilities. This webcast dives into big-picture considerations for teaching library credit courses.  What does the future of credit-bearing information literacy courses look like?  Learn about both shared and individual experiences with incorporating the Framework, introducing new pedagogical models, internal and external challenges facing credit-bearing courses, and plans for future program growth.

Complete details and registration information for e-Learning webcasts are available on the ACRL website. Contact Margot Conahan at mconahan@ala.org for more information.

Call for ACRL e-Learning proposals – 11/18 deadline

Submit a proposal for a live webcast or asynchronous online course and share your cutting-edge practices and innovative developments with your colleagues. Check out the ACRL e-Learning Call for Proposals online. Proposals are due November 18, 2016.

e-Learning Formats
Webcasts: ACRL webcasts are 60-90 minutes in length, including time for audience Q&A.  Presenters can use PowerPoint, online polls, white board, and other interactive tools during the webcast. Participants can interact with the presenters via text-based chat or audio. ACRL offers e-Learning webcast presenters a 10% royalty of webcast registration revenue, less production fees, split between the presenters.

Online Courses: ACRL online courses are primarily asynchronous events offered over the course of three or four weeks. Online courses are offered on the Moodle platform. Courses should include weekly readings, discussion questions, assignments, chat sessions, and/or a final assignment. ACRL provides one-time $1,000 for content development for new multi-week courses, as well as a royalty of 10% of the course registration fees, split between the presenters, each time the course is offered.

How to submit a proposal
Proposals must be submitted via the online submission form by November 18, 2016.

Questions should be directed to Margot Conahan at mconahan@ala.org or call (312) 280-2522.

ACRL e-Learning webcast – The Craft of Library Instruction (9/7)

Library instruction is like a theatre performance. You play a role as the instruction librarian. There is a live audience. You may receive reviews or evaluations. Or maybe the teaching experience feels more like an audition—a bit unnerving. Based on their recently published book, “The Craft of Librarian Instruction: Using Acting Techniques to Create Your Teaching Presence,” join Julie Artman, Jeff Sundquist, and Doug Dechow for a fun and creative approach to library instruction as they reveal how acting techniques can hone your presentation skills, your teaching style, and your performance to create an invigorating (and stress-free) learning experience for your students.  Complete webcast details and registration materials are available online. Contact Margot Conahan at mconahan@ala.org or call (312) 280-2522 with questions.

July/August ACRL e-Learning Events

ACRL is offering a variety of online learning events this summer to meet the demands of your schedule and budget.

Interactive webcasts last 60-90 minutes and take place in an interactive online classroom; group discounts are available.

Modern Pathfinders: Easy Techniques to Make Better Research Guides (July 20, 2016)
Librarians put many hours into creating research guides, and usage studies have shown that students use them very little. Learn some effective techniques of instructional design and web usability that any librarian can apply to make online guides better and more useful to your students, whether you’re using LibGuides or a home-brew system.

Excavating RDM from Library Data (August 4, 2016)
Learn how to implement research data management (RDM) concepts and techniques to library data with a goal of managing library data strategically.  In turn, apply your new RDM knowledge in outreach to your disciplinary faculty.

Online courses are primarily asynchronous and require approximately three to five hours a week.

Designing Curriculum & Developing Educators for the Information Literacy Courses of Tomorrow (July 18-August 5, 2016)
Is your information literacy course in need of an overhaul?  Do you want to deliver exceptional learning experiences through your credit course?  This online course will focus on information literacy curriculum development, including consideration of the Framework for Information Literacy and high impact practices with regards to content development and delivery.

Complete details and registration information for e-Learning webcasts are available on the ACRL website. Contact Margot Conahan at mconahan@ala.org for more information.

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