Category Archives: Circle of Friends

Circle of Friends: Kenley E. Neufeld

The ACRL Circle of Friends acknowledges the sustained generosity of those who have been Friends of ACRL for five or more years. The Friends of ACRL was created to provide a means for the association to take bold steps above and beyond its traditional member programs and services. Rapidly changing demographic, economic, and technological trends are presenting academic libraries and librarians with new challenges and competition that demand immediate solutions. The Friends of ACRL have responded to these new challenges and provided additional support that will enhance and ensure the relevance of our profession. To join or learn more about the Friends of ACRL, please visit the ACRL website.

Kenley NeufeldKenley E. Neufeld is the dean of Santa Barbara City College in Santa Barbara, CA. Kenley has been an ACRL member since 2001 and joined the ACRL Circle of Friends in 2011.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Calm, dependable, loyal.

2. Why do you support the Friends of ACRL? I found a professional home in ACRL in my early career that helped me grow as a library leader and library thinker. Being a part of ACRL guided me as a library advocate and educator. In those early years, it wasn’t always easy to pay the professional dues and attend multiple conferences each year. My primary goal in supporting the Friends of ACRL is to allow more young professionals to participate in our association and be able to attend the many conferences and programs.

3. What might someone be surprised to know about you? I am a fan of dark stories—both written and visual. I enjoy dumb science fiction movies—such as Resident Evil. I also love sad and/or depressing music. I enjoy experiencing my “dark side” through film and music and that plays alongside my lighter spiritual side which is very joyous. I was ordained by Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh as a dharma teacher and am authorized to teach meditation for retreats and mindfulness days.

4. Since you’ve become a member of ACRL, tell us about someone who influenced you in some way? In the 16 years that I’ve been an ACRL member, I have met so many wonderful and kind colleagues I can rely on both personally and professionally. It has been an honor to work alongside people like Steven Bell, Irene Herold, and Cynthia Steinhoff. I’ve worked closely with so many of the ACRL staff that I can’t begin to mention all their names, but they are inspiring for their many years of commitment. If I have to pick only one person, it will be Trevor Dawes. The influence from Trevor is primarily in the area of personality—most people underestimate the importance of soft skills—his positive and kind energy, his open heartedness, and of course his drive to move forward, to innovate, and pursue a dream. If any of us can replicate just a little bit of Trevor’s smile and openness, then we will all be able to live better.

5. What do you hope ACRL will achieve in the near future (or the long term)? We have an amazing association that has been a leader at the forefront of academic library efforts. It is a true wonder that we have been able to accomplish so much as a volunteer organization. As a community college librarian, I want the association to continue considering the community college library experience in all discussions, all planning, and in the creation of tools and resources. In the long term, we need an association that will lead librarians forward into new ways of thinking about libraries and library services. We also need to lead non-library educators into new ways of thinking about libraries and library services. This type of forward thinking requires creative think tanks, innovative professional development, and thinking beyond our past and beyond our profession.

6. In your opinion, what is the most important work that ACRL does? ACRL provides a gathering place for creativity, collaboration, engagement, and leadership across all types of academic libraries. ACRL is a voice for both the new and the seasoned professional. The most important work it provides are connections, colleagues, and community. It is the place to be.

Circle of Friends: Melissa Hubbard

The ACRL Circle of Friends acknowledges the sustained generosity of those who have been Friends of ACRL for five or more years. The Friends of ACRL was created to provide a means for the association to take bold steps above and beyond its traditional member programs and services. Rapidly changing demographic, economic, and technological trends are presenting academic libraries and librarians with new challenges and competition that demand immediate solutions. The Friends of ACRL have responded to these new challenges and provided additional support that will enhance and ensure the relevance of our profession. To join or learn more about the Friends of ACRL, please visit the ACRL website.

Melissa HubbardMelissa Hubbard is the head of Special Collections & Archives at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, OH. Melissa has been an ACRL member since 2006 and joined the ACRL Circle of Friends earlier this year.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Advocate, troublemaker, Gryffindor.

2. Why do you support the Friends of ACRL? I received a scholarship to the 2008 RBMS conference just a few months after I got my first professional job as a rare books librarian. It is not at all an exaggeration to say that receiving that scholarship is one of the best things that has ever happened to me and I don’t know where my career would be now if I hadn’t. I donate to the scholarship fund every year now because I hope I can provide the same kind of experience for those new to the field of special collections.

3. What might someone be surprised to know about you? I started my college career as a flute performance major, and I wanted to be a concert musician. I decided that wasn’t for me after a couple of years, but I do have one significant musical accomplishment: I have played Carnegie Hall.

4. Since you’ve become a member of ACRL, tell us about someone who influenced you in some way? Wow, I could never name just one person. RBMS is full of creative, generous, inspiring professionals at all stages of their careers and I have learned so much from so many.

5. What do you hope ACRL will achieve in the near future (or the long term)? I hope that ACRL will serve as a space for academic librarians to find ways to make a greater positive impact on communities outside the academy. I believe that academic libraries can and should serve a critical role in connecting the knowledge production and teaching that occurs in colleges and universities to broader communities, with a focus on building a more equitable, compassionate, and just society of lifelong learners. Education is a human right, but currently many people in the US do not have access to higher education, research collections, and/or crucial information technology. Academic librarians should do everything we can to bridge that gap.

6. In your opinion, what is the most important work that ACRL does? ACRL gives incoming professionals a clear path to forming connections to others in the field and developing their own identities as professionals. Without those pathways, I don’t think our field would be nearly as vibrant.

Circle of Friends: John M. Budd

The ACRL Circle of Friends acknowledges the sustained generosity of those who have been Friends of ACRL for five or more years. The Friends of ACRL was created to provide a means for the association to take bold steps above and beyond its traditional member programs and services. Rapidly changing demographic, economic, and technological trends are presenting academic libraries and librarians with new challenges and competition that demand immediate solutions. The Friends of ACRL have responded to these new challenges and provided additional support that will enhance and ensure the relevance of our profession. To join or learn more about the Friends of ACRL, please visit the ACRL website.

John BuddJohn M. Budd has recently retired as professor in the School of Information and Learning Technologies at the University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri. John has been an ACRL member since 1984 and a Friend of ACRL since 1999.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Teacher, scholar, nerd.

2. Why do you support the Friends of ACRL? I whole-heartedly believe in academic llibraries and the need to support them and librarians.

3. What might someone be surprised to know about you?  I’m a trivia expert.

4. Since you’ve become a member of ACRL, tell us about someone who influenced you in some way? I’ve very recently retired from the University of Missouri, but I’m exploring ways to keep active in ALA. I owe a huge debt to many people, including Michael Gorman and Richard Dougherty for helping me think and act as a professional. The two biggest influences have been Edward Holley and Lester Asheim. I miss them, but they are still with me in important ways.

5. What do you hope ACRL will achieve in the near future (or the long term)? I hope ACRL can take a lead in resolving the long-standing scholarly communications dilemma. In particular, I’d like to see ACRL and its members work with academic administrators to design a reasoned and workable communication and rewards structure for higher education.

6. In your opinion, what is the most important work that ACRL does? Advocacy and the development of young professionals. These are equally important and ACRL, as an organization, is masterful at both.

Circle of Friends: Kate S. Moriarty

The ACRL Circle of Friends acknowledges the sustained generosity of those who have been Friends of ACRL for five or more years. The Friends of ACRL was created to provide a means for the association to take bold steps above and beyond its traditional member programs and services. Rapidly changing demographic, economic, and technological trends are presenting academic libraries and librarians with new challenges and competition that demand immediate solutions. The Friends of ACRL have responded to these new challenges and provided additional support that will enhance and ensure the relevance of our profession. To join or learn more about the Friends of ACRL, please visit the ACRL website.

Kate S. MoriartyKate S. Moriarty is Rare Book Catalog Librarian and associate professor at Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri. She has been a Friend of ACRL since 2009.

1. Describe yourself in three words:  Detail-oriented. Loyal. Dedicated.

2. Why do you support the ACRL 75th Anniversary scholarship campaign? My home in ACRL has always been the Rare Books and Manuscripts Section (RBMS). I’ve been completely taken with it since my first RBMS preconference in 2004, which was so enriching and informative of the Section’s workings that I promptly attended every RBMS meeting I could at that year’s ALA Annual Meeting–they haven’t been able to get rid of me since. ACRL provides tremendous support to RBMS and its programming and outreach efforts, including a mechanism for donating to the division’s RBMS Scholarships Fund. What a gift to expose more people to RBMS preconferences, and what an even greater benefit to RBMS to have this influx of new, knowledgeable, and innovative rare materials individuals.

3. What might someone be surprised to know about you?  I’ve been involved in social justice work for the last 25 years and have participated in civil disobedience actions on homelessness, militarism, and environmental issues in Washington, D.C., Georgia, and Hawai’i.

4. Since you’ve become a member of ACRL, tell us about someone who influenced you in some way? Deborah J. Leslie, of the Folger Shakespeare Library, has been a tremendous influence on me. She was my conference buddy at my first RBMS preconference where she introduced me to other rare materials professionals, exposed me to the workings of RBMS, and provided me with valuable career advice. She taught me what I know about rare book cataloging (the errors are all mine) through her Rare Book Cataloging course at Rare Book School and her Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books) workshop. I’ve worked with her when she was chair of the RBMS Bibliographic Standards Committee and during her tenure as chair of RBMS. She continues to advise rare materials cataloging endeavors I’m involved with and I frankly don’t see a time when I won’t be seeking her counsel on cataloging issues.

5. What do you hope ACRL will achieve in the next 75 years? I would like to see a continued increase in ACRL’s diversity and additional programs for developing leaders to serve in the division and its sections.

6. In your opinion, what is the most important work that ACRL does? It’s hard to pick one thing. For me, personally, it’s been ACRL’s absolutely crucial service of supplying the avenue, structure, organization, and support to its sections and members to come together at a national level and conduct our work.

Circle of Friends: Karen A. Williams

The ACRL Circle of Friends acknowledges the sustained generosity of those who have been Friends of ACRL for five or more years. The Friends of ACRL was created to provide a means for the association to take bold steps above and beyond its traditional member programs and services. Rapidly changing demographic, economic, and technological trends are presenting academic libraries and librarians with new challenges and competition that demand immediate solutions. The Friends of ACRL have responded to these new challenges and provided additional support that will enhance and ensure the relevance of our profession. To join or learn more about the Friends of ACRL, please visit the ACRL website.

Karen WilliamsKaren A. Williams is dean of University Libraries at the University of Arizona in Tucson. She is the ACRL Vice-President/President-Elect and has been a Friend of ACRL since 2005.

1. Describe yourself in three words:  Passionate, forward-looking, integrity.

2. Why do you support the ACRL 75th Anniversary scholarship campaign? The ACRL Conference is a stimulating, innovative, member-responsive event that we are fortunate to have every other year. It provides an excellent way for librarians and library staff to share ideas, learn from each other, co-create, sample cutting edge products, work with vendors, find a professional home, and have a blast. This is an especially rich environment for early career librarians and I’m gratified to have this opportunity to support their attendance through scholarships. Those of us who have been in the profession for awhile are re-energized through sharing experiences and gaining new points of view from our newer colleagues.

3. What might someone be surprised to know about you?  I don’t collect books – with a few exceptions. That’s what libraries are for. I read my books and give them away in order to share the joy.  I do collect Mata Ortiz pottery, which has an interesting story, and single malt scotches (although those are for sharing as well).

4. Since you’ve become a member of ACRL, tell us about someone who influenced you in some way? Cerise Oberman parlayed her passion for the value of equipping students with research and information fluency skills into the creation of the Institute for Information Literacy, which has enriched the work of thousands of librarians through its programs and publications. Ray English was like a force of nature in the establishment of the original Scholarly Communication Committee, a very prolific group whose work remains impactful to this day. There are many others like Cerise and Ray who had vision, initiative, grit, and the power of persuasion to rally colleagues and make a difference in our professional lives, and the work we have been able to do on our campuses and with each other.

5. What do you hope ACRL will achieve in the next 75 years? I hope that ACRL will remain vibrant, nimble, and gutsy. If we can do this, we’ll continue to stay on top of the changing forces and remain integral to higher education. We’ll continue to hold the interests and contributions of experienced senior librarians and staff; and we’ll still be a compelling association for new librarians and other library professionals. I expect that what we do as professionals will continue to change radically over the next 75 years, but if we’re intentional about advancing the goals of higher education, ACRL will remain the go-to place for academic librarians and staff.

6. In your opinion, what is the most important work that ACRL does? ACRL provides education, advocacy, leadership, and scholarship – all while keeping a finger on the pulse of member needs.  ACRL is both a visionary and responsive organization.

1 2 3 4