Category Archives: Circle of Friends

Circle of Friends: Kate S. Moriarty

The ACRL Circle of Friends acknowledges the sustained generosity of those who have been Friends of ACRL for five or more years. The Friends of ACRL was created to provide a means for the association to take bold steps above and beyond its traditional member programs and services. Rapidly changing demographic, economic, and technological trends are presenting academic libraries and librarians with new challenges and competition that demand immediate solutions. The Friends of ACRL have responded to these new challenges and provided additional support that will enhance and ensure the relevance of our profession. To join or learn more about the Friends of ACRL, please visit the ACRL website.

Kate S. MoriartyKate S. Moriarty is Rare Book Catalog Librarian and associate professor at Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri. She has been a Friend of ACRL since 2009.

1. Describe yourself in three words:  Detail-oriented. Loyal. Dedicated.

2. Why do you support the ACRL 75th Anniversary scholarship campaign? My home in ACRL has always been the Rare Books and Manuscripts Section (RBMS). I’ve been completely taken with it since my first RBMS preconference in 2004, which was so enriching and informative of the Section’s workings that I promptly attended every RBMS meeting I could at that year’s ALA Annual Meeting–they haven’t been able to get rid of me since. ACRL provides tremendous support to RBMS and its programming and outreach efforts, including a mechanism for donating to the division’s RBMS Scholarships Fund. What a gift to expose more people to RBMS preconferences, and what an even greater benefit to RBMS to have this influx of new, knowledgeable, and innovative rare materials individuals.

3. What might someone be surprised to know about you?  I’ve been involved in social justice work for the last 25 years and have participated in civil disobedience actions on homelessness, militarism, and environmental issues in Washington, D.C., Georgia, and Hawai’i.

4. Since you’ve become a member of ACRL, tell us about someone who influenced you in some way? Deborah J. Leslie, of the Folger Shakespeare Library, has been a tremendous influence on me. She was my conference buddy at my first RBMS preconference where she introduced me to other rare materials professionals, exposed me to the workings of RBMS, and provided me with valuable career advice. She taught me what I know about rare book cataloging (the errors are all mine) through her Rare Book Cataloging course at Rare Book School and her Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books) workshop. I’ve worked with her when she was chair of the RBMS Bibliographic Standards Committee and during her tenure as chair of RBMS. She continues to advise rare materials cataloging endeavors I’m involved with and I frankly don’t see a time when I won’t be seeking her counsel on cataloging issues.

5. What do you hope ACRL will achieve in the next 75 years? I would like to see a continued increase in ACRL’s diversity and additional programs for developing leaders to serve in the division and its sections.

6. In your opinion, what is the most important work that ACRL does? It’s hard to pick one thing. For me, personally, it’s been ACRL’s absolutely crucial service of supplying the avenue, structure, organization, and support to its sections and members to come together at a national level and conduct our work.

Circle of Friends: Karen A. Williams

The ACRL Circle of Friends acknowledges the sustained generosity of those who have been Friends of ACRL for five or more years. The Friends of ACRL was created to provide a means for the association to take bold steps above and beyond its traditional member programs and services. Rapidly changing demographic, economic, and technological trends are presenting academic libraries and librarians with new challenges and competition that demand immediate solutions. The Friends of ACRL have responded to these new challenges and provided additional support that will enhance and ensure the relevance of our profession. To join or learn more about the Friends of ACRL, please visit the ACRL website.

Karen WilliamsKaren A. Williams is dean of University Libraries at the University of Arizona in Tucson. She is the ACRL Vice-President/President-Elect and has been a Friend of ACRL since 2005.

1. Describe yourself in three words:  Passionate, forward-looking, integrity.

2. Why do you support the ACRL 75th Anniversary scholarship campaign? The ACRL Conference is a stimulating, innovative, member-responsive event that we are fortunate to have every other year. It provides an excellent way for librarians and library staff to share ideas, learn from each other, co-create, sample cutting edge products, work with vendors, find a professional home, and have a blast. This is an especially rich environment for early career librarians and I’m gratified to have this opportunity to support their attendance through scholarships. Those of us who have been in the profession for awhile are re-energized through sharing experiences and gaining new points of view from our newer colleagues.

3. What might someone be surprised to know about you?  I don’t collect books — with a few exceptions. That’s what libraries are for. I read my books and give them away in order to share the joy.  I do collect Mata Ortiz pottery, which has an interesting story, and single malt scotches (although those are for sharing as well).

4. Since you’ve become a member of ACRL, tell us about someone who influenced you in some way? Cerise Oberman parlayed her passion for the value of equipping students with research and information fluency skills into the creation of the Institute for Information Literacy, which has enriched the work of thousands of librarians through its programs and publications. Ray English was like a force of nature in the establishment of the original Scholarly Communication Committee, a very prolific group whose work remains impactful to this day. There are many others like Cerise and Ray who had vision, initiative, grit, and the power of persuasion to rally colleagues and make a difference in our professional lives, and the work we have been able to do on our campuses and with each other.

5. What do you hope ACRL will achieve in the next 75 years? I hope that ACRL will remain vibrant, nimble, and gutsy. If we can do this, we’ll continue to stay on top of the changing forces and remain integral to higher education. We’ll continue to hold the interests and contributions of experienced senior librarians and staff; and we’ll still be a compelling association for new librarians and other library professionals. I expect that what we do as professionals will continue to change radically over the next 75 years, but if we’re intentional about advancing the goals of higher education, ACRL will remain the go-to place for academic librarians and staff.

6. In your opinion, what is the most important work that ACRL does? ACRL provides education, advocacy, leadership, and scholarship — all while keeping a finger on the pulse of member needs.  ACRL is both a visionary and responsive organization.

Circle of Friends: Irene M. H. Herold

The ACRL Circle of Friends acknowledges the sustained generosity of those who have been Friends of ACRL for five or more years. The Friends of ACRL was created to provide a means for the association to take bold steps above and beyond its traditional member programs and services. Rapidly changing demographic, economic, and technological trends are presenting academic libraries and librarians with new challenges and competition that demand immediate solutions. The Friends of ACRL have responded to these new challenges and provided additional support that will enhance and ensure the relevance of our profession. To join or learn more about the Friends of ACRL, please visit the ACRL website.

Irene M. H. HeroldIrene M. H. Herold is the University Librarian at the University of Hawaii at Manoa in Honolulu, Hawaii. She currently serves on the ACRL Board of Directors as a Director-at-Large (2011-2015) and has been a Friend of ACRL since 2009.

1. Describe yourself in three words:  Joyful, creative, contributing.

2. Why do you support the ACRL 75th Anniversary scholarship campaign? I am always inspired by the engaging work of ACRL.  Further, I interpreted minutes from a recent report that stated, “Show what you stand for – connect with a cause,” as a call to action.  There is no better cause or action than supporting my own profession and helping librarians with their professional development.

3. What might someone be surprised to know about you?  My father, who passed away last year, served on numerous boards – from community college to hospital to community service organizations – and gave generously to his alma mater and in support of children’s charities.  My service, and the opportunity to contribute in a fiduciary way, feels like continuing the thread of community engagement modeled by my father.  When I give or serve, I reflect the responsibility my father saw in contributing to the community and feel close to him.

4. Since you’ve become a member of ACRL, tell us about someone who influenced you in some way? There have been so many, from Larry Hardesty, Mignon Adams, and Tom Kirk who contributed interviews on association leadership development to my dissertation, to learning about William Moffett.  For my response, I travel back to the first ACRL Section officer who placed me on a committee, Lynne M. Rudasill.  When I contacted her and asked about serving on a committee, we both noted that I no longer was a government documents librarian, although still interested in the topics that the Law and Political Science Section (LPSS) covered.  Lynne agreed to place me on the LPSS program planning committee, but told me to continue to seek out committee work with other sections too.  Due to this, when Robin Wagner was the College Libraries Section (CLS) Vice Chair, I did not hesitate to contact her and talk about service with CLS, too.  Without Lynne’s encouragement and coaching I might have missed this opportunity to connect more broadly within the academic library community.

I have been so fortunate to have been active with two sections, serving on committees, and now through my ACRL Board Director-at-Large position as liaison to three sections (Distance Learning, Literatures in English, and Women and Gender Studies) plus an ACRL division-level committee, Research and Scholarly Environment.  Lynne’s encouragement was a turning point in a new-to-association-work librarian’s connection with ACRL.

5. What do you hope ACRL will achieve in the next 75 years? To paraphrase Pogo, “I have met ACRL and ACRL is us!”  We will continue our landmark work in advocacy, information fluencies, national conferences and pertinent programming, e-learning, leadership and leadership development, mentoring and training programs, workshops and pre-conferences, career and job services, and building the knowledge base through publishing.  I also expect ACRL to continue to be taking the pulse of academic and research librarianship and responding to the changing needs of the profession in a nimble and active way.

6. In your opinion, what is the most important work that ACRL does? ACRL listens to, and acts upon, information from not only its membership, but also higher education, in delivery of high quality and relevant member support.

Circle of Friends: Helen H. Spalding

The ACRL Circle of Friends acknowledges the sustained generosity of those who have been Friends of ACRL for five or more years. The Friends of ACRL was created to provide a means for the association to take bold steps above and beyond its traditional member programs and services. Rapidly changing demographic, economic, and technological trends are presenting academic libraries and librarians with new challenges and competition that demand immediate solutions. The Friends of ACRL have responded to these new challenges and provided additional support that will enhance and ensure the relevance of our profession. To join or learn more about the Friends of ACRL, please visit the ACRL website.

Helen SpaldingHelen H. Spalding served as ACRL President 2002-2003, and is a charter member of the Friends of ACRL (founded in 1998).

1. Describe yourself in three words:  Grateful, Active, Committed.

2. Why do you support the Friends of ACRL? ACRL is exceptionally administered with integrity, accountability, and transparency.  The variety of programs and services ACRL provides members is amazing, given the budget within which it operates and its dependence on volunteer leadership.  Student and members’ ability to attend conferences, and ACRL’s revenue streams are not adequate to fulfill all needs.  The ACRL Friends funds are necessary to provide scholarships for conference attendance and awards encouraging and recognizing innovation, to strengthen ACRL’s advocacy on behalf of our library users, and to fund strategic initiatives.  If each of us contributes what we can, the Friends has the ability to continue to make a crucial difference in individual academic librarians’ professional development and in our ability to make a positive difference for those we serve.  Donors can be confident their funds are handled responsibly and effectively.

3. What might someone be surprised to know about you?  As a retiree, I love being active as a volunteer and in singing, readers theater, a drama group, a book group, and as Chair of the local public library board.

4. Since you’ve become a member of ACRL, tell us about someone who influenced you in some way? So many mentors and colleagues have influenced me, many without knowing the impact they made.  Each gave a different perspective on leadership and/or service, and each saw and encouraged potential in me that I did not see in myself.  Charles Churchwell, Kaye Gapen, Hugh Atkinson, Carla Stoffle, JoAnn Segal, Liz Salzer, Mary Ellen Davis, Sue Martin, Sarah Pritchard, Camila Alire, Betsy Wilson, Theresa Byrd, Ray English, John Popko, Louise Sherby, Elizabeth Henry, Brenda Dingley, Marilyn Carbonell, and Adriene Lim are only some of those who inspired me to grow and encourage others to make the most of their potential. (Forgive me for not naming so many others who made a critical difference to me and to so many others!)

5. What do you hope ACRL will achieve in the near future (or the long term)? I hope ACRL continues to remain sustainable as an effective member association, and is the go-to voice for academic librarianship in the higher education, scholarly communication, and legislative arenas.  Too often, the strength of the whole is not valued on behalf of the many different concerns of the association.

6. In your opinion, what is the most important work that ACRL does? ACRL provides a place of professional engagement that greatly enhances what librarians can gain through education and experience. Incredibly bright, creative, sharing colleagues generate ideas, inspiration, advocacy, networking, and programs that are richer for the collaboration.  Together, we bring diverse backgrounds and perspectives, enriching the impact we have on librarianship, teaching, learning, and scholarship more than what we could accomplish separately for our libraries and higher education. The cost of dues and conference attendance always has been worth what I have gained personally and professionally through participation.  I can continue to say thank you through the ACRL Friends.

Circle of Friends: Larry L. Hardesty

The ACRL Circle of Friends acknowledges the sustained generosity of those who have been Friends of ACRL for five or more years. The Friends of ACRL was created to provide a means for the association to take bold steps above and beyond its traditional member programs and services. Rapidly changing demographic, economic, and technological trends are presenting academic libraries and librarians with new challenges and competition that demand immediate solutions. The Friends of ACRL have responded to these new challenges and provided additional support that will enhance and ensure the relevance of our profession. To join or learn more about the Friends of ACRL, please visit the ACRL website.

Larry HardestyLarry L. Hardesty served as ACRL President from 1999-2000, received the ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year Award in 2001, and has been a Friend of ACRL since 1998.

1. Describe yourself in three words:  Persistent, reliable, productive.

2. Why do you support the Friends of ACRL? ACRL, both the membership and the staff, has been very supportive of me in my career in many ways.  This is my way of “passing along” all this support I have received over the past thirty plus years.

3. What might someone be surprised to know about you?  Outside of a few people, I think most people would be surprised to know that just about every leadership role I had in ACRL, ranging from my first committee chair in the College Libraries Section to serving as President of ACRL and chairing an ACRL national conference, I took on very reluctantly.  This also includes, although not technically part of ACRL, my twenty plus years of leadership of the College Library Directors’ Program.  Looking back, I am glad that people had confidence in me and pushed me out of my comfort zone.  I hope I lived up to their expectations.

4. Since you’ve become a member of ACRL, tell us about someone who influenced you in some way? There are so many people, a lot of them are members of the Circle of Friends, who influenced me in countless important ways.  I wished I could name them all, but since I cannot in the space allowed here, I hope they know who they are.  The singular person who influenced me most was Evan Farber.  Evan gave me numerous opportunities, and he provided a model which I strived to emulate but never came close to achieving. 

5. What do you hope ACRL will achieve in the near future (or the long term)? Being retired and away from ACRL a few years I have not kept up with current goals of ACRL.  Nevertheless, I hope it continues to enhance its role as the professional organization for academic librarians.  This includes establishing and promulgating standards, providing venues for professional development, and encouraging collaboration and cooperation with other professional organizations.  ACRL must continue to work to ensure that individual members know that they are not alone and are part of a larger noble cause.

6. In your opinion, what is the most important work that ACRL does? ACRL provides a professional voice for academic librarians through which we can talk both to each other within the profession and to those outside the profession.

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