Author Archives: Sophie Skinner

Member of the Week: Katherine S. Donaldson

Katherine DonaldsonKatherine S. Donaldson is a social sciences and education librarian at the University of Oregon in Eugene, OR. Katherine has been an ACRL member since 2014 and is your ACRL member of the week for March 13, 2017.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Curious, motivated, reflective.

2. What are you reading (or listening to on your mobile device)? I’ve been reading a few essays from The Intersectional Internet: Race, Sex, Class, and Culture Online, edited by Safiya Noble and Brendesha Tynes. I’m also currently reading IQ by Joe Ide and Without You, There Is No Us by Suki Kim.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Collaborative, informative, discovery.

4. What do you value about ACRL? I value the many opportunities that ACRL provides to connect with other members of the academic library community through its sections, interest groups, and committees. As an early-career librarian, I have found that ACRL provides a wealth of resources for professional development. I appreciate that there are many opportunities for members to get involved at all levels and with different interest areas.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? I am the UO Libraries primary liaison to the College of Education. This means that I get to work with a wide variety of undergraduate and graduate students, faculty members, and researchers with interests in teaching, learning, and social equity. I provide information literacy instruction, research consultations, and collection development services to support members of this community.

6. In your own words: I have found it to be very rewarding to work with students and faculty to support a community of learning and scholarship. No two days of work are ever the same and I’m always learning something new! It’s also been fulfilling to be part of a larger professional community that values information access, literacy, and intellectual freedom.


Editor’s Note: Are you an ACRL member? Would you like to be featured as ACRL Member of the Week? Nominate a colleague? Contact Mary Jane Petrowski at mpetrowski@ala.org for more information.

Meet the Candidates: Jeanne R. Davidson

Editor’s Note: In the lead-up to the 2017 ALA/ ACRL election, we’re profiling the 2017 ACRL Board of Directors candidates. We’ll feature one candidate in slate order each weekday from March 3 — 10. Complete details on candidates for ACRL offices are available on the election website. Make sure to vote for the candidates of your choice starting March 13.

Jeanne DavidsonJeanne R. Davidson is the head of public services at South Dakota State University in Brookings, South Dakota, and a 2017 candidate for the ACRL Board of Directors as Director-at-Large.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Collaborative, strategic, learner.

2. What are you reading right now (or listening to on your mobile device)? How to Reduce Workplace Conflict and Stress: How Leaders and Their Employees Can Protect Their Sanity and Productivity From Tension and Turf Wars by Anna Maravelas.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Relevant, educational, network.

4. Why do you value about ACRL? Over the years, ACRL has provided me with numerous opportunities for professional growth and engagement. Through my participation in ACRL, I have developed a network of colleagues across the country who share similar goals, face similar challenges and are willing to engage in the work of addressing the issues facing our profession. ACRL comprises an incredible brain trust of individuals who share their time and talents in an effort to make our profession the best it can be. ACRL has always been, and continues to be, my professional “home” of choice.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? Academic libraries are central to the success of students and faculty, whether they realize it or not. At a time when “fake news” and “alternative facts” abound, as an academic librarian I participate in the campus-wide conversations focused on preparing our students as critical thinkers and curious life-long learners. Keeping abreast of the multitude of changes in the information and technology universe and bringing the best of these to our users is an ongoing challenge and a value-added service to our institutions.

6. In your own words: Academic/research libraries are people places focused on learning and the creation and preservation of knowledge. The work of the wide variety of people employed in our libraries allows us to enrich the scholarly conversation for our faculty and students, at whatever level they may be entering into it. We live and work in a dynamic and challenging environment filled with new technologies and ever-growing options for communication and information dissemination. I appreciate the opportunity (and responsibility) to explore this evolving information landscape with our faculty and students, enabling them to be successful learners, teachers, and researchers.

Meet the Candidates: Annemarie Roscello

Editor’s Note: In the lead-up to the 2017 ALA/ ACRL election, we’re profiling the 2017 ACRL Board of Directors candidates. We’ll feature one candidate in slate order each weekday from March 3 — 10. Complete details on candidates for ACRL offices are available on the election website. Make sure to vote for the candidates of your choice starting March 13.

Annemarie RoscelloAnnemarie Roscello is a professor and information literacy program facilitator at Bergen Community College in Paramus, New Jersey, and a 2017 candidate for the ACRL Board of Directors as Director-at-Large.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Initiator, insightful, perceptive.

2. What are you reading right now (or listening to on your mobile device)? I am currently reading three books:
a. The Fifth Discipline: The Art & Practice of the  Learning Organization by Peter M. Senge
b. Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist’s Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations by Thomas L. Friedman
c. By One Vote: The Disputed Presidential Election of 1876 by Michael F. Holt

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Synergetic, advocating, educational.

4. Why do you value about ACRL? I value that ACRL aspires to provide a collegial, coordinated and collaborative learning atmosphere of the highest quality to advance our profession. Accomplishing these aspirations depends on the time, effort and expertise of ACRL’s members who value the integral role of libraries and librarians within institutions of higher education and society. I value most the power ACRL gives to its members to become leaders who shape the future of our profession.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? In the role of information literacy facilitator, I contribute to the intellectual development of each student our instruction program touches. Through collaboration and assessment, the program is continually evolving to improve outcomes. With each role and project, I endeavor to inform and guide college colleagues about the outstanding services, resources, and facilities the library provides. My library colleagues deliver exceptional services, in-depth knowledge, and expertise, which allows me to confidently promote the library to the college’s students, faculty, and administrators. By teaching College Success, I have a better understanding of faculty concerns and can help provide solutions.

During my tenure at BCC, I have served in numerous roles which include six years as chair of faculty development, serving on the steering committee for BCC’s accreditation study and leading current OER projects.  With each role, I declare the value of the library to student success.

6. In your own words: Every day is a fulfilling adventure. Deciding to go to library school was an important decision but becoming a community college librarian was transformative. I work each day in the heart of the college; the place where tentative students become confident and successful. There are new challenges every day as the profession evolves but what does not change is the connection with students and working to guide them as they increase their knowledge through inquiry.

Meet the Candidates: Kelly Jacobsma

Editor’s Note: In the lead-up to the 2017 ALA/ ACRL election, we’re profiling the 2017 ACRL Board of Directors candidates. We’ll feature one candidate in slate order each weekday from March 3 — 10. Complete details on candidates for ACRL offices are available on the election website. Make sure to vote for the candidates of your choice starting March 13.

Kelly JacobsmaKelly Jacobsma is the dean of libraries at Hope College in Holland, Michigan, and a 2017 candidate for the ACRL Board of Directors as Director-at-Large.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Curious, committed, joyful.

2. What are you reading right now (or listening to on your mobile device)? The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Advocate, innovate, educate.

4. Why do you value about ACRL? While a large organization, ACRL feels smaller because it is such a great community of practitioners who value contribution, collaboration, and each other’s ideas. I appreciate that ACRL is both a policy leader to whom we can turn for guidance and a source for high quality professional development and ideas. ACRL helps us to serve our institutions by being not only responsive to change within the higher education landscape but by being out in front on many issues.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? At this point in my career I hope I am facilitating the conversation about how the library contributes to student learning and faculty scholarship and aligning library goals with the college’s strategic plan. This includes a campus-wide conversation about a renovation of the library to bring together academic support services. I also have done a lot to promote the use of our special collections for student research. I think my greatest accomplishment of late is getting a new digital liberal arts librarian position approved and hiring a great person to fill it.

6. In your own words: I have always felt incredibly lucky to have a job where I can say that I learn something new every day and work with people who see the world through a wide variety of disciplinary lenses. Life is never dull or without challenges in academia and this is doubly true of academic libraries. The library is an excellent neutral player that can partner with a variety of departments and offices on campus to support student learning and faculty scholarship. We are opportunity rich—whether creating metadata, managing digital resources or teaching information literacy, everyone in an academic library supports the mission of our institutions.

Meet the Candidates: Erin T. Smith

Editor’s Note: In the lead-up to the 2017 ALA/ ACRL election, we’re profiling the 2017 ACRL Board of Directors candidates. We’ll feature one candidate in slate order each weekday from March 3 — 10. Complete details on candidates for ACRL offices are available on the election website. Make sure to vote for the candidates of your choice starting March 13.

Erin T. SmithErin T. Smith is the associate dean for library and information services at Westminster College in New Wilmington, PA, and a 2017 candidate for the ACRL Board of Directors as Director-at-Large.

1. Describe yourself in three words: Inquisitive. Analytical. Optimistic.

2. What are you reading right now (or listening to on your mobile device)? The Ivy & Bean series written by Annie Barrows and illustrated by Sophie Blackall. And I’m listening to a lot of podcasts these days: two of my favorites are RadioLab and Judge John Hodgeman.

3. Describe ACRL in three words: Inclusiveness. Advocacy. Scholarship.

4. Why do you value about ACRL? ACRL has a lot to offer academic librarians, but the thing I value the most is the community it enables. From committee work to discussion groups to conference presentations, ACRL makes it easy to connect with others who share your professional interests.

5. What do you, as an academic librarian, contribute to your campus? As an academic librarian at a small liberal arts college, I directly support the educational mission of my institution by connecting our students, faculty, and staff with the information they need to make meaningful contributions to human knowledge and understanding.

6. In your own words: Never before have the skills that librarians teach been more important to the success of our students—both in the classroom and in life. Not only can we provide a tremendous service to our campuses by cultivating solid collections that are relevant to our curricula and research interests, we also have a responsibility to make sure our students develop the critical thinking skills to find, evaluate, and use information well. Through information literacy instruction, we can teach our students that finding information on their topic is not enough; rather, in order to excel they must find the best information on their topic—even when that information is in a (gasp!) print book.

1 2 3 14