Author Archives: Mary Jane Petrowski

New ACRL Publication: 2016 Academic Library Trends and Statistics

2016 Academic Library Trends and StatisticsACRL announces the publication of 2016 Academic Library Trends and Statistics, the latest in a series of annual publications that describe the collections, staffing, expenditures and service activities of academic libraries in all Carnegie classifications. The one-volume title includes data from Associate of Arts Colleges, Baccalaureate Colleges, Master’s Colleges and Universities, and Research/Doctoral-granting Institutions. Those who purchase the print edition will receive a complimentary one-year subscription to the 2016 survey data available through ACRL Metrics, an online subscription service that provides access to the ACRL survey data from 1999-2016.

The 2015 data show that library expenditures for collection materials averaged $5,623,980 for doctoral degree-granting institutions; $701,778 for comprehensive degree-granting institutions; $493,206 for baccalaureate schools and $148,822 for associate-degree granting institutions. On average, doctoral degree granting institutions spent 70.9% of their materials budgets on ongoing commitments to subscriptions in 2016; comprehensive schools spent an average of 79.2%; baccalaureate schools spent an average 74.2% and associate degree granting institutions spent an average of 55.2%. On average, academic libraries spent 69.8% of their materials budget on subscriptions.

The 2016 data show that expenditures for salaries and wages accounted for 57.2% of the total library expenditures on average. Salaries and wages constituted 76.5% of total library expenditures for associate-degree granting institutions, 52.3% for baccalaureates, 55.7% for comprehensive schools, and 44.5% for doctoral/research institutions.

In the past five years, 21% of all academic libraries saw increases for staffing while 19% saw decreased funding and 60% reported flat budgets. During the same time period, almost 61% of academic libraries re-purposed and/or cross-trained staff to better support new technologies or services in the libraries or provide support new positions or departments in the library.  Retirements and budget constriction were also factors influencing the need for re-purposing and cross-training. The top five systems/projects currently supported by academic libraries include web development, open access/institutional repositories, learning systems, digital humanities, and digital media production.

Academic libraries also provide specialized assistance in these top six areas: copyright, metadata, data management, research impact, instructional design, and data visualization. In the past five years more than 58% of all academic libraries surveyed have their reference staffing models, with the most popular change being a switch to on-call staffing. Libraries are providing staff and other forms of support to many campus services including writing centers (42%), tutoring (39%), testing (25%), diversity and equity (12%), and digital scholarship labs (11%).

The 2016 survey includes data from 1,525 academic libraries in five major categories:

  • Collections (including titles held, volumes, and electronic books)
  • Expenditures (library materials, salaries and wages, etc.)
  • Library services
  • Staffing
  • Staffing trends (including budget shifts, specialized assistance, cross-training, reference staffing, information literacy services, support for campus units)

The survey also provides analysis of selected variables and summary data (high, low, mean and median) for all elements. The 2016 data can be used for self-studies, budgeting, strategic planning, annual reports, grant applications, and benchmarking.

2016 Academic Library Trends and Statistics is available for purchase through the ALA Online Store, by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

Sign Up Now for an ACRL Buddy at the 2017 ALA Annual Conference

Are you planning to attend your first ALA Annual Conference? First-time attendees are invited to sign up for a conference buddy who can guide you through selecting conference sessions, navigating conference venues, and answer any other questions you might have. This is a great way to learn about ACRL and expand your professional network!

How much time are we talking? It’s up to you. We suggest the buddy/mentor make the first contact after initially signing up and go from there. You may want to meet up at the ACRL 101 on Saturday, June 24, from 8:30-10:00 a.m. at the Hilton Chicago, Continental C  room (a great start for newbies, and refresher for veterans), the Exhibit Opening Reception on Friday, June 24, from 5:30-7:00 p.m., or meet for coffee. You might meet up with your buddy just once, or a few times throughout the conference. The intent is primarily for helping orient the new person to the event and helping them feel comfortable (we were all new once!).

Interested? Sign up now! The deadline is Wednesday, June 14, 2017.

NMC Horizon Report > 2017 Library Edition

The New Media Consortium (NMC), University of Applied Sciences (HTW) Chur, Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB), ETH Library, and ACRL are jointly releasing the NMC Horizon Report > 2017 Library Edition at the ACRL 2017 Conference. This is the third edition of the NMC Horizon Report that explores the realm of academic and research libraries in a global context.

This report describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, a 15-year-old ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies poised to influence learning, teaching, and creative inquiry. Six key trends, six significant challenges, and six important developments in educational technology are placed directly in the context of their likely impact on the core missions of academic and research libraries. The topics are summarized in the accompanying infographic.

Top 10 “Sound Bites” from the Report

 1. Each topic is placed into one or more of six meta-categories that reflect movements in academic and research libraries: 1) Expanding Access and Convenience; 2) Spurring Innovation; 3) Fostering Authentic Learning and Discovery; 4) Balancing Societal Shifts; 5) Tracking Research and Patron Data; and 6) Spreading Digital Fluency.

2. The Introduction looks back at the topic sets for the past three library-focused editions of the NMC Horizon Report. Over time, the Evolving Nature of the Scholarly Record and Research Data Management have been the most pervasive trends, Embracing the Need for Radical Change the most targeted challenge, and the Internet of Things the most enduring technology development.

3. The topics in the report were selected by a diverse panel of 75 experts. Library leaders, librarians, technologists, industry leaders, and other key stakeholders from 14 countries comprise this year’s expert panel. They engaged in a three-month virtual discussion to share how the trends, challenges, and technologies are materializing in their environments.

4. The Executive Summary presents 10 highlights capturing the big picture themes of educational change that underpin the 18 topics. Among the themes are the notions that better catering to patrons’ needs requires user-centric design and a focus on accessibility and that advancing innovation necessitates the reimagining of organizational structures.

5. Semi-finalists — topics from the cutting room floor that almost made the report — are listed. The shift away from books, marketing library services, mixed reality, and more were all heavily considered by the expert panel. They could make a comeback in the next edition!

6. The report illuminates examples of compelling trends, solutions, and technology initiatives in practice at academic and research libraries. Leaders seeking inspiration, models, and tactical insight around strategy and technology deployment can look to these exemplars from across the world.

7. Three new challenges to the NMC Horizon Project were proposed by the panel and voted into the report. They are: 1) Accessibility of Library Services and Resources; 2) Adapting Organizational Designs to the Future of Work; and 3) Economic and Political Pressures. The expert panel’s inclusion of these topics signals a need to look outward — to deeply consider major societal shifts.

8. Big Data and Digital Scholarship Technologies are both considered on the “near-term horizon” for widespread adoption. The former topic reflects the desire to track and analyze the data generated via online resources and services to better meet patron needs. The latter refers to the suite of digital and computational tools used to advance scholarship as libraries continuously integrate new emerging technologies.

9. Artificial Intelligence and the Internet of Things are poised to amplify the utility and reach of library services. These developments on the “far-term horizon” can personalize the library experience for patrons, connecting them more efficiently to resources that best align with their goals.

10. The inclusion of topics such as Patrons as Creators and Improving Digital Literacy shed light on library professionals’ roles as deeper learning guides. Libraries are well-positioned to lead efforts that develop patrons’ digital citizenship and content creation skills, ensuring mastery of responsible and creative technology use.

The NMC Horizon Report > 2017 Library Edition is published under a Creative Commons license to facilitate its widespread use, easy duplication, and broad distribution.

 

Making the Most of Your First ACRL Conference: Special Webcasts

ACRL 2017 logoWe are so pleased that there will be more than 1,225 first-time attendees at ACRL 2017 in Baltimore. The ACRL Membership Committee is sponsoring two special webcasts to help you plan for the upcoming trip and make the most of your conference experience.

These one-hour interactive sessions provide tips and personal recommendations on how to prepare for your trip to Baltimore, including making the most of your time, planning your schedule, networking, conference etiquette, access to the virtual conference, and much more!

We realize that not everyone can attend, so we’ll also be making recordings of the webcasts available as soon as possible.

Friday, March 3, 2017

Start Time: 03/03/2017 2:00PM CST

Duration: 1 hour

URL: http://ala.adobeconnect.com/r9024nbtogr/

Access: Anyone who has the URL for the meeting can enter the room

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Start Time: 03/09/2017 1:00PM CST

Duration: 1 hour

URL:  http://ala.adobeconnect.com/r2kl8l7sdn4/

Access: Anyone who has the URL for the meeting can enter the room

 

 

Submit Projects for the NMC Horizon Report > 2017 Library Edition

The expert panel has completed voting and the topics for the NMC Horizon Report > 2017 Library Edition have been selected — below. The report is a collaboration between the NMC, the University of Applied Sciences (HTW) Chur, Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) Hannover, and ETH-Bibliothek Zurich, with ACRL as the distribution partner. It is set to be released on March 23, 2017, at the ACRL 2017 Conference. We’re now looking for any projects, programs, policies, or leadership initiatives that fit any of the chosen areas. View definitions and discussions of all of the final topics on the 2017 Horizon.Library Project wiki.

Submit examples through the brief web form with a title, a URL, and a one- or two-sentence description. The process takes about two minutes and the deadline is Monday, February 13. Complete details are available on the NMC website.

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