Author Archives: Kara Malenfant

Open Scholarship Early and Often: Register to Join Community Conversation on March 22 at ACRL 2017

Register before February 22, 2017, for the latest Association of Research Libraries (ARL)/Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Institute on Scholarly Communication event, “Open Scholarship Early and Often,” to be held March 22, 2017, in conjunction with the ACRL 2017 Conference. Registration for the conference is separate and not required to attend this event.

Don’t miss this opportunity to help drive a lively discussion with your colleagues about ways in which open infrastructure and open workflow tools can support the creation, preservation, and dissemination of open content.

Facilitators

  • Amy Buckland, Head, Research & Scholarship, University of Guelph
  • Rachel Frick, Executive Director, OCLC Research Library Partnership
  • Tara Robertson, Accessibility Librarian, Centre for Accessible Post-secondary Education Resources–British Columbia (CAPER-BC) at Langara College
  • Jeffrey Spies, Co-founder and Chief Technology Officer, Center for Open Science; Assistant Professor, Department of Engineering and Society, University of Virginia
  • Ana Van Gulick, Librarian, Carnegie Mellon University

Format
A little more structured than an unconference but a little less formal than a workshop, participants will engage in dialogues around a series of pre-defined topics and our expert facilitators will ensure that the conversation remains on track and productive.

Takeaways
As a result of participating in this conversation, attendees will:

  • Understand the value and potential of a thoughtful approach to workflow in order to provide more effective access and integrate with other scholarship
  • Understand the strategic importance of investing time and energy into local institutional policies and be better prepared to convey this value to others
  • Be aware of key elements needed to plan and coordinate resources for sustainable implementation of open infrastructure
  • Be better prepared to negotiate the political and cultural atmosphere around open scholarship
  • Be inspired to ensure there is a diversity of voices and the entire community is included in conversations about open scholarship, which supports a sustainable open infrastructure
  • Identify opportunities for collaboration, partnerships, and coordinated effort
  • Develop recommendations for local use at home campuses (on tools to use, conversations to have, how to build trust)

Event Details and Registration
Date: Wednesday, March 22, 2017
Time: 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
Location: Baltimore (Maryland) Convention Center
Fee: $100. Registration fee includes morning refreshment and afternoon break. Lunch is on your own.

Registration: Register online by Wednesday, February 22, 2017. Registration for the ACRL 2017 Conference is separate from this event (and not required).

About the Association of Research Libraries
The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is a nonprofit organization of 124 research libraries in the US and Canada. ARL’s mission is to influence the changing environment of scholarly communication and the public policies that affect research libraries and the diverse communities they serve. ARL pursues this mission by advancing the goals of its member research libraries, providing leadership in public and information policy to the scholarly and higher education communities, fostering the exchange of ideas and expertise, facilitating the emergence of new roles for research libraries, and shaping a future environment that leverages its interests with those of allied organizations. ARL is on the web at ARL.org, Facebook at facebook.com/association.of.research.libraries, and Twitter at @ARLnews.

About the Association of College & Research Libraries
The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) is the higher education association for librarians. Representing nearly 11,000 academic and research librarians and interested individuals, ACRL (a division of the American Library Association) develops programs, products, and services to help academic and research librarians learn, innovate, and lead within the academic community. Founded in 1940, ACRL is committed to advancing learning and transforming scholarship. ACRL is on the web at acrl.org, Facebook at facebook.com/ala.acrl, and Twitter at @ala_acrl.

About the Institute on Scholarly Communication
The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) jointly sponsor the Institute on Scholarly Communication (ISC) to promote the development of library-led outreach on scholarly communication issues. The institute has hundreds of alumni from numerous events forming a community that provides peer support and professional sharing of information relating to campus outreach.

Second Draft of ACRL Action-Oriented Research Agenda Released; Feedback due by Feb. 17

val-1The team from OCLC Research which is developing a new action-oriented agenda on library contributions to student learning and success has released a second draft (PDF). Team members seek your input and reactions via the feedback form by February 17, 2017.

Learn about the team’s continued progress and next steps during ACRL’s Update on the Value of Academic Libraries Initiative at ALA Midwinter meeting on Sunday, January 22, 2017, 1:00 PM – 2:30 pm. In this session, join ACRL’s Value of Academic Libraries committee chair to hear the context for this work along with OCLC Research’s project director and project team members. Ask questions and give your feedback on the second draft.

Find out more about the scope of the agenda and background on the project website or by watching the recording of a November ACRL online forum.

ACRL to Host Mellon / ACLS Public Fellow

Mellon ACLS Public Fellows Program logoACRL is pleased to announce its selection as a host organization for the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows Program, a career-building fellowship initiative designed to expand the reach of doctoral education in the humanities. In 2017, the Public Fellows program will place up to 22 recent PhDs from the humanities and humanistic social sciences in two-year staff positions at partnering organizations in government and the nonprofit sector. Fellows will participate in the substantive work of these organizations and will receive professional mentoring, an annual stipend, and health insurance.

The Public Fellow placed at ACRL will advance one of the association’s highest priorities by contributing to efforts to improve research around library contributions to student learning and success, which ties directly to our strategic goal that academic libraries demonstrate alignment with and impact on institutional outcomes.

“We are delighted to be selected by ACLS to participate in this important program,” said ACRL Executive Director Mary Ellen Davis. “The work of ACRL’s fellow will expand our capacity to focus on student success and the value of academic libraries.”

Working with an engaged community of academic librarians and library researchers, the Mellon/ACLS Public Fellow placed at ACRL will advance research focused on student learning and success and promote findings from our forthcoming action-oriented research agenda to resonate across the network of higher education stakeholders. Additionally, the fellow will contribute to the work of ALA’s Center for the Future of Libraries to help academic library professionals more fully embrace the future of information and libraries in higher education.

The deadline to apply for the ACRL fellow position is March 22, 2017. ACLS seeks applications from recent PhDs in the humanities who aspire to careers in administration, management, and public service by choice rather than circumstance. For more information on the program and the position description (pdf), please visit the ACLS website.

Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows is a fellowship program offered by the American Council of Learned Societies with generous funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Please direct all inquiries about the fellowship program to ACLS.

Network Neutrality in the Cross Hairs

Jointly authored by Larra Clark, Krista Cox and Kara Malenfant.

It is widely reported that network neutrality is one of the most endangered telecommunications policy gains of the past two years. The ALA, ARL and ACRL—with EDUCAUSE and other library and higher education allies—have been on the front lines of this battle with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Congress, and the courts for more than a decade. Here’s an update on where we stand, what might come next, and what the library community may do to mobilize.

What’s at stake: Net neutrality is the principle that internet service providers (ISPs) should enable access to all content and applications regardless of the source, and without favoring or blocking particular services or websites. Net neutrality is essential for library and educational institutions to carry out our missions and to ensure protection of freedom of speech, educational achievement, research and economic growth. The Internet has become the pre-eminent platform for learning, collaboration, and interaction among students, faculty, library patrons, local communities, and the world.

In February 2015, the FCC adopted Open Internet rules that provided the strongest network neutrality protections we’ve seen, and which are aligned with library and higher education principles for network neutrality and ongoing direct advocacy with FCC and other allies. The rules:

  • Prohibit blocking or degrading access to legal content, applications, services, and non-harmful devices; as well as banning paid prioritization, or favoring some content over other traffic;
  • Apply network neutrality protections to both fixed and mobile broadband, which the library and higher education coalition advocated for in our most recent filings, as well as (unsuccessfully) in response to the 2010 Open Internet Order
  • Allow for reasonable network management while enhancing transparency rules regarding how ISPs are doing this;
  • Create a general Open Internet standard for future ISP conduct; and
  • Re-classify ISPs as Title II “common carriers.”

As anticipated, the decision was quickly challenged in court and in Congress. A broad coalition of network neutrality advocates successfully stymied Congressional efforts to undermine the FCC’s Open Internet Order, and library organizations filed as amici at the U.S. Appeals Court for the D.C. Circuit. In June 2016, the three-judge panel affirmed the FCC’s rules.

What’s the threat: During the presidential campaign, and with more specificity since the election, President-elect Donald Trump and members of his transition team, as well as some Republican members of Congress and the FCC, have made rolling back network neutrality protections a priority for action.

Here’s a sample of what we are reading and hearing these days:

As in the past, attacks on network neutrality may take many different forms, including new legislation, judicial appeal to the Supreme Court, initiating a new rulemaking and/or lack of enforcement by new FCC leadership, or new efforts by ISPs to skirt the rules.

For instance, there may be an effort by some Members of Congress to craft a “compromise” bill that would prohibit blocking and degradation by statute but reverse the FCC’s decision to classify ISPs as Title II common carriers.  We are wary, however, that this so-called compromise may not give the FCC the authority to enforce the statutory rules.

So, now what? As the precise shape of the attacks is still taking form, the library and higher education communities are beginning to connect and engage in planning discussions. We will monitor developments and work with others to mobilize action to ensure Open Internet protections are preserved.

Library advocates can help in several ways:

  • Stay informed via District Dispatch blog (subscribe here) and ARL Policy Notes blog (subscribe here).
  • Sign up for Action Alerts so we can reach you quickly when direct action is needed.
  • Share your stories, blog and engage on social networks about the importance of network neutrality and the need to defend it.

Larra Clark is Deputy Director for the ALA Office for Information Technology Policy and Public Library Association. Krista Cox is ARL Director of Public Policy Initiatives. Kara Malenfant is ACRL Senior Strategist for Special Initiatives.

ACRL Scholarly Communication Workshop Hosts Announced

Scholarly Communication workshopThe ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee has selected five sites to host the workshop “Scholarly Communication: From Understanding to Engagement” as road show events in 2017. Recognizing that scholarly communication issues are central to the work of all academic librarians and all types of institutions, ACRL is underwriting the bulk of the costs of delivering this proven content by sending expert presenters on the road.

The institutions selected to host the 2017 road shows are:

  • Council of Research and Academic Libraries (San Antonio, TX)
  • Portland State University Library (Portland, OR)
  • University of Delaware Library (Newark, DE)
  • University of Nebraska-Lincoln (Lincoln, NB)
  • Worcester Polytechnic Institute (Worcester, MA)

Led by two expert presenters, this structured interactive overview of the scholarly communication system has been updated with a series of targeted modules that reflect the most exciting and pressing issues in the field today. The workshop focuses on access, emerging opportunities, intellectual property, and engagement along with deep dives into selected topics of greatest interest to each host community. Academic and research librarians increasingly recognize scholarly communication as a core competency of the profession. The workshop goal is to empower participants to help accelerate the transformation of the scholarly communication system.

Host sites are partnering with other institutions and organizations in their area to extend the reach to as diverse an audience as possible. Library staff, including liaison librarians, catalogers, access services and senior management from two-year, liberal arts, master’s, comprehensive and doctoral institutions will attend the workshops.

In addition to offering a partial subsidy on a competitive basis to these five hosts, ACRL offers this workshop and a variety of others that can be brought upon request to your campus, chapter, or consortia. Led by expert presenters, these one-day immersive workshops are designed to engage participants and help academic librarians strengthen competencies in multiple areas of concentration. Read more about ACRL’s licensed workshops and contact ACRL Program Coordinator Chase Ollis at collis@ala.org or (312) 280-2521 to discuss dates and locations, pricing, and for complete workshop details.

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