Author Archives: Erin Nevius

The Library Assessment Cookbook

Library Assessment CookbookACRL announces the publication of The Library Assessment Cookbook, edited by Aaron W. Dobbs. This new addition to the ACRL Cookbook series compiles lessons and techniques for academic librarians to adapt, repurpose, and implement in their libraries.

Assessment examines how library services and resources impact and are perceived by users, and guides strategic planning discussions and development of future acquisitions and services. Assessment is fundamental to positioning your library within your organization and effectively demonstrating how it furthers your institution’s goals. And it can be more of an art than a science, using the qualitative and quantitative data available to you to show your library’s alignment with the needs and mission of your organization.

The Library Assessment Cookbook features 80 practical, easy-to-implement recipes divided into nine sections:

  • Data Preparation for Assessments
  • Traditional and Online Collections Assessments
  • Instruction Programs Assessments
  • Outreach and Programming Assessment
  • Assessments Assessment
  • Strategic Planning Assessment
  • Service Points and Services Assessment
  • Equipment, Building, and Space Assessment
  • Website and Web Services Assessment

This Cookbook will help librarians of all levels of experience measure and demonstrate their institutional value.

The Library Assessment Cookbook is available for purchase in print and as an ebook through the ALA Online Store and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

The Self as Subject: Autoethnographic Research into Identity, Culture, and Academic Librarianship

ACRL announces the publication of The Self as Subject: Autoethnographic Research into Identity, Culture, and Academic Librarianship, edited by Anne-Marie Deitering, Robert Schroeder, and Richard Stoddart. This collection of reflective narratives explores the varied dimensions of librarianship in the present moment, and examines autoethnography’s potential to help librarians answer questions that cannot be answered by traditional, empirical research methods and to reveal voices that are obscured by aggregations of data.

Autoethnography is a type of research that uses writing and self-examination to explore far-ranging cultural, political, and social issues through personal experience. It is a qualitative, reflexive, ethnographic method where the researcher is also the subject of inquiry.

Using autoethnography as their research method, the 21 academic librarian authors of The Self as Subject investigate aspects of what it means to be a librarian. Starting with a reflective examination of themselves, they each investigate questions of culture, values, and identity. All of the pieces in this volume share some characteristics: Each one is the result of a rigorous examination of the self and lived experience, and each one moves between the subjective and the cultural in its analysis. How the authors do this, however, varies widely—from a graphic novel to speculative fiction to rigorous academic analysis.

The Self as Subject provides an opportunity to expand our understanding of rigor and the practice of research in LIS, and explores what it means to be a librarian in this age of disruptive change, and how the various identities and experiences we bring to our practice shape our experience of librarianship. This book is for any librarian interested in research and research methods; the use of literary genres in research; alternatives to large empirical studies; questions of identity and social justice; and those looking to step out of their comfort zone and approach learning from a new and challenging vantage point. As Barbara Fister writes in the foreword, “this collection is something rare and important for the discipline of librarianship.”

The Self as Subject: Autoethnographic Research into Identity, Culture, and Academic Librarianship is available for purchase in print and as an ebook through the ALA Online Store; in print through Amazon.com; and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

Zotero: A Guide for Librarians, Researchers and Educators, Second Edition

Zotero book coverACRL announces the publication of Zotero: A Guide for Librarians, Researchers and Educators, Second Edition by Jason Puckett. Functioning as a thorough introduction to Zotero—from setting up to saving, organizing, and citing items, and ending with more advanced topics—as well as a guide to teaching Zotero, this is both a user’s guide to the tool and a handbook for understanding how different groups use it.

2011’s Zotero: A Guide for Librarians, Researchers and Educators was the first book-length treatment of this powerful research tool, and this completely revised and updated second edition is still the perfect guidebook to this robust, open access research tool that allows the user to manage all aspects of bibliographic data. In addition to functioning as a user’s and teacher’s guide, the book looks at strategies for developing effective support structures and channels within an institution and building the right linkages between relevant players, in particular library support staff and IT.

As Sebastian Karcher, associate director of the Qualitative Data Repository at Syracuse University and leading specialist on the Zotero reference management software and the Citation Style Language, says in his Foreword to the book, “In this second edition of Zotero, Jason has significantly updated and improved on his 2011 edition, drawing on his rich experience supporting, teaching, and “evangelizing” Zotero…[a] successful teacher will find this guide to understanding not just Zotero but also its users indispensable.”

This second edition, in full color, includes many more figures, screenshots, and illustrations, revised bibliographies, substantial changes to the chapter on online tools, and the addition of a completely new chapter on add-ons and mobile applications. Zotero is a comprehensive guide for researchers who just need a how-to to help them make bibliographies; instruction librarians and teachers using Zotero in conjunction with classes doing research assignments; and reference librarians and tech support staff who are helping users with Zotero questions and problems.

Zotero: A Guide for Librarians, Researchers and Educators, Second Edition is available for purchase in print and as an ebook through the ALA Online Store and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

Creative Instructional Design: Practical Applications for Librarians

ACRL announces the publication of Creative Instructional Design: Practical Applications for Librarians, edited by Brandon K. West, Kimberly D. Hoffman, and Michelle Costello. This is a comprehensive exploration of why instructional design is so impactful for academic librarians—intentionality, collaboration, and engagement—and provides extensive examples of how librarians are using instructional design to craft and assess new and innovative services, teach information literacy, develop online content, and design programs and outreach initiatives in a targeted and mindful way.

With the explosion of accessible information online and students feeling more and more independent in their searching skills and information needs, libraries are shifting to user-centered models. These changes are requiring librarians to define the library by the services it can provide, especially innovative ones, such as publishing services, scholarly communications, and project management. Regardless of the instructional format, from classes to workshops to videos to worksheets, instructional design strives to ensure that potential learning gains by students are maximized and that the instruction is evaluated for improvement in future iterations.

Creative Instructional Design examines ways in which librarians are using instructional design principles to inform, construct, or evaluate information literacy initiatives; online library instruction and services; and programming and outreach efforts, and provides ways for instructors, trainers, and educators to both approach instruction creation systematically, and evaluate how it has been effective and how it can be improved.

Creative Instructional Design: Practical Applications for Librarians is available for purchase in print and as an ebook through the ALA Online Store and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

Mobile Technology and Academic Libraries: Innovative Services for Research and Learning

Mobile Technology and Academic Libraries coverACRL announces the publication of Mobile Technology and Academic Libraries: Innovative Services for Research and Learning, edited by Robin Canuel and Chad Crichton. This is a detailed and thorough examination of technology that’s emerging now, and how to incorporate it into your library to help the students and researchers of both today and tomorrow.

Mobile technology has become a ubiquitous presence in the lives of students and faculty. The maturing of this technology has led to our becoming more and more comfortable in a world where digital information flows seamlessly from screen to screen as we move about our daily lives. This evolution presents both risks and opportunities for academic librarians, operating in a field that is both uniquely tied to a static sense of “place” in the public imagination and at the same time passionately devoted to the freedom, spread, and accessibility of information for the public at large.

In seventeen chapters ranging from A Mobile-First Library Site Redesign to Virtual Reality Library Environments, Mobile Technology and Academic Libraries explores how librarians around the world are working to adapt their spaces, collections, teaching, and services to the new possibilities presented by mobile technology.

Leveraging the potential of smartphones, tablets, and even wearable technologies allows academic librarians to further expand their reach to students and faculty beyond the library’s walls. Furthermore, by understanding how mobile technology changes the behavior of library users, we can gain new insights into their needs and make improvements to our traditional services and spaces to better contribute to faculty research and student learning.

Mobile Technology and Academic Libraries is available for purchase in print and as an ebook through the ALA Online Store; in print through Amazon.com; and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

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