Author Archives: Erin Nevius

Financial Management in Academic Libraries: Data-Driven Planning and Budgeting

Financial Management in Academic Libraries coverACRL announces the publication of Financial Management in Academic Libraries: Data-Driven Planning and Budgeting by Robert E. Dugan and Peter Hernon. The book explores the connection between financial management and accountability, effectiveness, efficiency, and sustainability, and demonstrates how to capture them in a realistic, data-supported budget.

All library managers must understand and manage budgets, from planning through implementation, reporting, and conducting audits. Budgeters also need familiarity with the use of metrics, the ability to relate the use of the data gathered to improved performance and organizational efficiency, and automated management information systems to effectively tell their library’s story and advocate for budgetary support.

In its first eight chapters, with tables, figures, data application, and exercises throughout, Financial Management in Academic Libraries covers the various stages and topics involved in managing budgets: planning; the types of budgets used in academic institutions; the overall budgeting process as well as a specific process in program budgeting; managing a budget during the fiscal year and its aftermath; and providing reports on the budget. The ninth chapter introduces general concepts to help address budget reduction strategies, potential fraud, and financial best practices. And the final chapter elevates the discussion from financial management to financial leadership, the articulation of a detailed vision, and the realignment of the budget with the promises specified in that vision.

Among the different units of an academic institution, the library has an advantage in that its managers can link its effectiveness directly to the library’s infrastructure, its staffing, collections, services, and technology. Focusing on these components can enable everyone in the library to work to achieve organizational sustainability over time and advocate for their place in the institution.

Financial Management in Academic Libraries: Data-Driven Planning and Budgeting is available for purchase in print and as an ebook through the ALA Online Store and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

 

The Fun of Motivation: Crossing the Threshold Concepts

Fun of Motivation coverACRL announces the publication of The Fun of Motivation: Crossing the Threshold Concepts by Mary Francis, book number 71 in ACRL’s Publications in Librarianship series. This innovative book combines theory with specific lesson plans and assessment options to help readers explore, implement, and assess this powerful means of motivation.

What’s the place of fun in education? When students learn something new, they reach a learning edge, a threshold, where learning becomes uncomfortable because the material is difficult or beyond their understanding. To avoid this discomfort, some students can simply fall back on what they already know. This is a critical point, because if they do not move beyond the edge, they are stuck with both limited knowledge and a negative feeling about learning. Fun can be used as a motivating technique to help students get past this learning edge, and to meet an established goal or learning objective.

The Fun of Motivation: Crossing the Threshold Concepts is organized into two parts—Part I examines the theories behind motivation and fun in the classroom, and offers three instructional techniques that highlight their benefits. Part II is the application of the theories explored in Part I, and its six chapters each address one of the threshold concepts provided in ACRL’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Each chapter contains three lesson plans addressing the threshold concept, one for each of the three fun instructional techniques. Assessment opportunities are provided throughout, with formative assessment strategies as well as summative assessments, including sample rubrics to apply to a range of student work. Each lesson plan ends with a section on possible modifications and accommodations and additional ideas on how to adapt the lesson for different student populations.

The threshold concepts within the Framework need to be facilitated with deliberation by librarians integrating them into their instruction sessions. Students must be motivated to learn these concepts that help them master skills across disciplines. The Fun of Motivation can help you utilize this compelling means of motivation.

The Fun of Motivation: Crossing the Threshold Concepts is available for purchase in print and as an ebook through the ALA Online Store and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

Disciplinary Applications of Information Literacy Threshold Concepts

Disciplinary Applications of Information Literacy Threshold Concepts coverACRL announces the publication of Disciplinary Applications of Information Literacy Threshold Concepts, edited by Samantha Godbey, Susan Beth Wainscott, and Xan Goodman. In 25 chapters divided into sections mirroring ACRL’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education—Authority is Constructed and Contextual, Information Creation as a Process, Information has Value, Research as Inquiry, Scholarship as Conversation, and Searching as Strategic Exploration—Disciplinary Applications of Information Literacy Threshold Concepts explores threshold concepts as an idea and the specifics of what the concepts contained in the Framework look like in disciplinary contexts.

The definition of threshold concepts has been expanded over the years based on the work of many educational scholars and practitioners, but are essentially described as a portal, transition, or threshold to additional learning and deeper understanding for a learner. Threshold concepts are transformative, integrative, irreversible, bounded, and troublesome, and can be a valuable tool in both facilitating students’ understanding of their subject and aiding in curriculum development within the disciplines.

Disciplinary Applications of Information Literacy Threshold Concepts provides a balance of theoretical and practical to help readers both conceptually and pragmatically with their work in supporting student learning, including chapters in which librarians have designed learning outcomes aligned with the frames of the Framework. These examples demonstrate different approaches to working with information literacy threshold concepts and how librarians are incorporating them within their disciplinary and institutional contexts. The chapters cover many disciplines, including the humanities, social sciences, life sciences, and physical sciences, and a range of students, from first-year undergraduates to doctoral students. As Ray Land says in the Foreword, “This volume marks a significant new departure in the development of the threshold concepts analytic framework.”

Disciplinary Applications of Information Literacy Threshold Concepts is available for purchase in print and as an ebook through the ALA Online Store and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

Undergraduate Research and the Academic Librarian: Case Studies and Best Practices

Undergraduate Research coverACRL announces the publication of Undergraduate Research and the Academic Librarian: Case Studies and Best Practicesedited by Merinda Kaye Hensley and Stephanie Davis-Kahl. In 25 chapters featuring 60 expert contributors, Undergraduate Research and the Academic Librarian is a detailed guide to how librarians can help students go beyond a foundation of information literacy toward advanced research and information management skills, and align the library with institutional goals of engagement and retention.

Undergraduate research is often conflated with standard end-of-semester research papers, featuring APA style bibliographies and a certain number of sources. But in fact, undergraduate research is one of several high-impact educational practices identified by George Kuh and the Association of American Colleges & Universities, and is increasingly seen as a vital part of the undergraduate experience. Research helps students connect the dots between their interests, general education courses, writing requirements, and major coursework, and increases learning, retention, enrollment in graduate education, and engagement in future work.

Undergraduate Research and the Academic Librarian explores the strategic new services and cross-departmental collaborations academic libraries are creating to support research: publishing services, such as institutional repositories and undergraduate research journals; data services; copyright services; poster printing and design; specialized space; digital scholarship services; awards; and much more. These programs can be from any discipline, can be interdisciplinary, can be any high-impact format, and can reflect upon an institution’s own history, traditions, and tensions.

As higher education becomes more competitive—for dollars, for students, for grant money, for resources in general—institutions will need to increase their development of programs that provide the experiential and deep learning, and increased engagement, that research provides. The scholarly and extracurricular experiences of college are increasingly becoming a major part of marketing college education. Beyond the one-shot, beyond course-integrated instruction, Undergraduate Research and the Academic Librarian examines how the structures that undergird undergraduate research, such as the library, can become part of the core infrastructure of the undergraduate experience.

Undergraduate Research and the Academic Librarian is available for purchase in print and as an ebook through the ALA Online Store; in print through Amazon.com; and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

 

Now You’re a Manager: Quick and Practical Strategies for New Mid-Level Managers in Academic Libraries

Now You're a Manager coverACRL announces the publication of Now You’re a Manager: Quick and Practical Strategies for New Mid-Level Managers in Academic Libraries by M. Leslie Madden, Laura Carscaddon, Denita Hampton, and Brenna Helmstutler. With ten chapters covering everything from building teams to creating a respectful workplace to managing university politics, Now You’re a Manager provides lists, exercises, and techniques for assembling and managing an effective, happy team.

Many of us were never taught how to be managers before we began managing. Maybe you sought the position and interviewed for it, or maybe you were appointed to fill a need. Perhaps your long-term goal is upper-level library management, or maybe you’re happy where you are and aren’t sure how you’d like your career to progress.  Whatever the case, this guide will provide you with quick, easy-to-implement tips and strategies for tackling the most common issues encountered by mid-level managers in an academic library:

  • Managing and Building Departments and Teams
  • Managing Diverse Departments
  • Creating a Respectful Workplace and Dealing with Problem Employees
  • Professional Development and Training
  • Mentoring and Coaching
  • Conducting Effective Meetings
  • Managing Between Library Administration and Your Employees
  • Managing Library and University Politics and Bureaucracy
  • Managing Change
  • Managing as a Team

Now You’re a Manager is designed to meet the specific needs of new mid-level managers in academic libraries, and can be used for individual growth or group discussion, and by librarians and paraprofessionals who manage teams and departments.

Now You’re a Manager: Quick and Practical Strategies for New Mid-Level Managers in Academic Libraries is available for purchase in print and as an ebook through the ALA Online Store and by telephone order at (866) 746-7252 in the U.S. or (770) 442-8633 for international customers.

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