Next Steps for Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy

Editor’s Note: In this post, Joyce L. Ogburn, Chair of ACRL’s Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy Task Force, provides an update on Task Force activities.

In 2013, ACRL issued two major publications that integrate two strong ACRL programs — information literacy and scholarly communication. The first publication to be issued was a white paper that articulated salient issues and potential connections between these two areas. [1] Close on its heels, ACRL published an open access book with contributed chapters that explored many different crossovers and intersections. [2]

In 2014, the ACRL Board appointed a task force to continue the efforts. Specifically, the task force was charged with “monitoring and responding to reactions to the white paper and use of the white paper, as well as proposing and delivering sustainable professional development opportunities building on the ideas and recommendations in the white paper.” We began our work at the ALA Midwinter Meeting, and this column summarizes our work to date.

  • Three members of the task force, along with ACRL Executive Director Mary Ellen Davis, gave a project briefing at the April 2014 CNI meeting. The discussion elicited new arenas for librarians to explore: e-portfolios; accessibility issues; undergraduate research; digital citizenship; digital identity and security of personal information; student services; and campus IT.  We encourage you to consider how these suggestions might play out on your campus. [3]
  • Three members of the task force published an article in the September 2014 issue of C&RL News addressing the work of the task force and how their libraries are applying emerging concepts. Take a look at what each is doing. [4]
  • The task force is contributing to ACRL’s new initiative on data management by addressing the concept of data literacy. A section on data literacy, with text drawn from the white paper, was added as a resources link in the Scholarly Communication Toolkit data management tab. [5]
  • We will be offering webinars with such topics as including scholarly communication with information literacy in job descriptions and expectations for librarians. Be watching for announcements.
  • A panel session at the ACRL 2015 Conference in Portland, Oregon, will engage attendees in dialogue to inform the final report, which is due to the board before the 2015 ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco. Please come join the conversation.

There are more activities in the planning stages. We want to hear from members who are using the white paper, perhaps as a guide to incorporating new topics into information literacy instruction, embedding information in research guides, developing targeted workshops for new services such as open access publishing or managing intellectual property rights, or working in new ways with partners on campus. We encourage you to add your ideas and activities in the comments section of this posting.

Task Force Members: Jeff Belliston, Barbara DeFelice, Mel Desart, Terri Fishel, Julia Gelfand, Merinda Kaye Hensley, Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Joyce Ogburn, Kevin Smith, Jean Zanoni, Kara Malenfant (ACRL Staff Liaison)

Resources Cited:

1. ACRL (2013). Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy: Creating Strategic Collaborations for a Changing Academic Environment. Chicago: ACRL. http://acrl.ala.org/intersections/.

2. Stephanie Davis-Kahl and Merinda Kaye Hensley, eds. (2013). Common Ground at the Nexus of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication. ChicagoACRL.
http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/publications/booksanddigitalresources/digital/commonground_oa.pdf.

3. Mary Ellen Davis, Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Merinda Kaye Hensley, and Joyce L. Ogburn (2014). “Enriching How We Teach and Learn:  The Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy.” Project Briefing, CNI April 1, 2014. http://www.cni.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/tuesday_ogburn_acrl_-enriching.pdf.

4. Stephanie Davis-Kahl, Teresa A. Fishel, and Merinda Kaye Hensley (2014). “Weaving the Threads of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy into Academic Librarian Roles.” C&RL News, September: 441- 444. http://crln.acrl.org/content/75/8/441.full.pdf+html.

5. Data Literacy Essay (2014). ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit. http://acrl.ala.org/scholcomm/?page_id=330.

– Joyce L. Ogburn, Chair, Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy Task Force

One comment

  • Great update on the ongoing work! While I see several examples of how to connect information literacy instruction and scholarly communications education in academic libraries in the work to date, e.g., undergraduate research initiatives, copyright education, use of IRs, etc., I see one area identified that seems to have great potential, but has not been fully explored – digital citizenship.

    Digital citizenship is a concern of student affairs programs in higher education, and has been at least since Tracy Mitrano articulated the IL skills necessary to address challenges related to Facebook use at Cornell in 2006 (http://www.it.cornell.edu/policies/socialnetworking/facebook.cfm). This 2014 tweet was one of the “Student Affairs Tweets of the Week” (http://josieahlquist.com/2014/01/27/infusing-digital-citizenship-into-higher-education/). Digital citizenship would be a great opportunity to bring together libraries, residence hall education programs, and other student affairs efforts.

    Digital citizenship is now a recognized component of K-12 education, as seen in the relevant section of the ISTE Web site (http://www.iste.org/resources/searchresults?keywords=Digital+citizenship). This suggests an opportunity to link scholarly communications education efforts across ACRL and AASL in the same way that the Interdivisional TF has done previously on other K-20 topics; it also suggests an unusually good opportunity to link efforts with PLA, as such programs are also part of public library instructional programs (http://webjunction.org/news/webjunction/digital-citizenship-and-public-libraries.html). We’re always looking for good ways to bring together discussions of instruction across academic and public libraries; financial literacy was one such opportunity and digital citizenship is another.

    If the TF (or others) have done more work in this area that I noted, I would love to see it (and to see it continue).