Feb 17 2017

2017 ULS Candidate for Member-at-Large: Bruce Henson

Bruce Henson is one of three candidates this year for ULS Member-at-Large. He is the Associate Dean of Research and Learning Services at Georgia Institute of Technology Library. Read this interview to learn more about Bruce and what his goals would be if elected as Member-at-Large.

Tell us more about yourself and how you became an academic librarian.

I received my MLS in May 1997 and began my librarian career at the Georgia Tech Library in February 1998 as a Reference Librarian. I am currently the Associate Dean for Learning and Research Services at Georgia Tech Library. I originally planned to stay only three years at Georgia Tech and have chosen to stay because of the opportunities to participate in an always evolving research library, which has had an environment of experimentation. Becoming a librarian was a mid-life career change—I worked for over a decade as an Audio-Visual Technician at a community college library (when AV meant filmstrips and 16mm films), during which time I earned a BA and decided to pursue an MLS.

How long have you been involved in ULS and what attracted you to the section?

I’ve been a ULS member since the beginning of my librarian career in 1998, when a mentor helped guide me to a committee membership on the ULS Communications Membership Committee. I subsequently served as Co-chair of the ULS Communications Committee from 2000-2002, Chair of the ULS Membership Committee from 2002-2006 (which was a brand new committee), ULS Member at Large from 2005 – 2008, and as a member of the ULS Program Committee (2002-2003), ULS Nominating Committee (2008 – 2009) and ULS 2010 Program Planning Committee (2008 – 2010). I was attracted to the section because of the opportunities to network and learn, and because people in the section were very willing to mentor me.

In your opinion, what are some of the most interesting topics or trends we are seeing in university libraries?

A fascinating project that I’m involved with is the reimagining of the Georgia Tech Library, including the complete renovation of buildings, a new organization and infrastructure, and redesigning services for the 21st century research library. Part of the project is to create a library online presence that is as good as or better than the library’s physical presence.

4. What goals for the section would you have if elected to this position? How do you envision committees and members helping the section achieve those goals?

To maximize university libraries sharing information and best practices on how to best serve our users and redefine our services and resources. ULS. To serve as a place for networking and mentoring and learning.

Where do you see ULS going in the future? How does it need to change and evolve to stay relevant to academic librarians?

As the largest ACRL section, ULS has the potential to serve as a valuable source of professional development and information sharing and discussion. Because of its size, being relevant to all members is a challenge, which can be addressed by ULS continuing to be adaptable to its members’ needs, as it has in recent years in the areas of committee membership.

Tell us something interesting about yourself that not very many people know.

I read about 200 books a year, fiction and non-fiction and am an avid fan of movies and film history.

Read our interviews with the other candidates for ULS Member-at-Large, Nancy Garmer: http://www.acrl.ala.org/ULS/2017-uls-candidate-for-member-at-large-nancy-garmer/ and Ryan Litsey: http://www.acrl.ala.org/ULS/2017-uls-candidate-for-member-at-large-ryan-litsey/


Feb 17 2017

2017 ULS Candidate for Member-at-Large: Ryan Litsey

Ryan Litsey is one of three candidates this year for ULS Member-at-Large. He is an Associate Librarian at Texas Tech University Libraries. Read this interview to learn more about Ryan and what his goals would be if elected as Member-at-Large.

Tell us more about yourself and how you became an academic librarian.

I was a doctoral student for a time when I got my first job in an academic library. While I was unsuccessful in doctoral school, I did realize while working the potential for helping students of all varieties achieve their academic mission through the library. The desire to help is what lead me to Library school and eventually to my current position as a member of the Texas Tech University Libraries

How long have you been involved in ULS and what attracted you to the section?

I am a relative new comer to ULS. What attracted me to the ULS section is the ability to connect with other academic librarians who have similar goals and ambitions for helping students. As a current student of Student Development theory I am also interested in learning more from my colleagues about college student development and the role the academic library plays. Even though I am a newcomer to ULS, I am not without experience in ALA committees. I am a very active participant in RUSA/STARS given my role as the head of Document Delivery and Interlibrary Loan.

In your opinion, what are some of the most interesting topics or trends we are seeing in university libraries?

I think the current climate of multivariate methods of assessment are very interesting to me. I am also very intrigued about new technologies that can help student access the library as well as gain access to materials and resources previously unavailable, like 3D objects, and makerspaces

What goals for the section would you have if elected to this position? How do you envision committees and members helping the section achieve those goals?

My goals are two fold

First, I think there should be a continued examination of methodologies of assessment. Assessment is a best way to understand our users and their expectations. I think that all of the sections can contribute meaningfully to ideas and methods assessment. Given the variety of methods of assessment and student expectations I think now is a very interesting time when we consider how we understand what our students want and expect from the library

Second, libraries should invest more in library-developed technologies. In times of shrinking budgets and increasingly mainstreamed and often expensive services, it would behoove libraries to examine ways they can develop technologies that meet their unique needs in house.

Where do you see ULS going in the future? How does it need to change and evolve to stay relevant to academic librarians?

The future for ULS for me is also two-fold.

First, access to new resources. The expectations student bring to the contemporary academic library have been informed by the technology they have access to and often use personally. These technologies have changed what students view as resources that can be supplied by the library. A library at is core is a place where students and faculty can gain access to items they cannot access on their own. To that end, the academic library needs to take on the challenge of developing and providing new types of resources. We have already seen this happened, with smart boards, augmented reality, 3D printing, virtual reality, etc. Each of these technologies helps transform the learning experience.

Second, using cutting edge technological advances libraries can deploy the copious amounts of information they collect on a daily basis to transform the ways in which the library can help students. Using technologies like, predictive analytics, machine learning and anticipatory commerce, libraries can fundamentally alter and improve the interaction between the library and the library patron.

Tell us something interesting about yourself that not very many people know.

In my free time I use my librarian skills to collect, restore and play vintage videogames from the original 1984 NES era. I have over 1500 videogames in a room in my house.

Read our interviews with the other candidates for ULS Member-at-Large, Nancy Garmer: http://www.acrl.ala.org/ULS/2017-uls-candidate-for-member-at-large-nancy-garmer/ and Bruce Henson: http://www.acrl.ala.org/ULS/2017-uls-candidate-for-member-at-large-bruce-henson/


Feb 17 2017

2017 ULS Candidate for Member-at-Large: Nancy Garmer

Nancy Garmer is one of three candidates this year for ULS Member-at-Large. She is the Acting Assistant Dean of User Experience and Learning at Florida Institute of Technology. Read this interview to learn more about Nancy and what her goals would be if elected as Member-at-Large.

nancy garmerTell us more about yourself and how you became an academic librarian.

I worked in the Brevard County Public Library system for ten years before accepting a job at Florida Institute of Technology as the head of Public Services. User experience and adult services are my areas of expertise and my transition to the academic environment has been transformative in terms of the expansiveness of user experience opportunities at this STEM research university.

How long have you been involved in ULS and what attracted you to the section?

When I joined ACRL two years ago, I was looking for a way to reach out to the professional academic librarian community. I gathered, correctly, that the listserv and committees would provide a dynamic exchange of information to help shape my understanding of academic libraries and fuel my growth as an academic librarian.

In your opinion, what are some of the most interesting topics or trends we are seeing in university libraries?

The Library’s role in student success is a pressing one. I currently sit on two subcommittees to support Library involvement in meeting student needs and enhancing retention and graduation rates. I also believe the pursuit of Open Access as a new model for scholarly publishing and OER are trends that will drive the future of libraries.

What goals for the section would you have if elected to this position? How do you envision committees and members helping the section achieve those goals?

I would like to see ULS embrace sustainability issues as an integral goal of university librarianship. Social responsibility, civic engagement and outreach to international students are all necessary components of a growing, global community of which the Library plays a central role. I think these goals should be central to the ULS Committee on the Future of University Libraries.

Where do you see ULS going in the future? How does it need to change and evolve to stay relevant to academic librarians?

Libraries inherently change and evolve and I think relevancy is no longer an issue. As professionals, librarians are continuously embracing new frameworks, strategies, technologies and spaces to support evolving learning models and digital scholarship. The members of ULS, the largest section of ACRL, will carry ULS into the future.

Tell us something interesting about yourself that not very many people know.

I was a caretaker for properties on an island in the Caribbean for a year and in the North Atlantic for two years before moving to Melbourne, Florida. I then served as an AmeriCorps volunteer for a year which provided the impetus and stipend for my MLIS. Thank you for considering me!

Read our interviews with the other candidates for ULS Member-at-Large, Bruce Henson: http://www.acrl.ala.org/ULS/2017-uls-candidate-for-member-at-large-bruce-henson/ and Ryan Litsey: http://www.acrl.ala.org/ULS/2017-uls-candidate-for-member-at-large-ryan-litsey/


Feb 15 2017

Assessing Library Space: A Framework for Getting Started

assessing library space

Join the University Libraries Section on March 8, 2017 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm (EST) for an online presentation and discussion about assessing user needs to advocate for and design learning spaces in academic libraries.

The panel of experts will discuss frameworks for assessing user space, major considerations in doing so, and their experiences assessing and redesigning library space. The presentation is intended for individuals new to assessing learning spaces in academic libraries and will have a Q&A session at the end.

Featured Speakers

Kim Duckett, Head, Research and Instructional Services, Duke University

  • Kim was part of the team that created the IMLS-funded Learning Space Toolkit and has led or co-led workshops on library space assessment at the Library Assessment Conference (with Joan Lippincott of CNI) and the Texas Library Association Conference.

Mandy Shannon, Head of Instruction and Research Services, Wright State University

  • Mandy is the chair of a six-person assessment team that conducted a year-long building use study and needs assessment, and presented on that process at the Library Assessment Conference.

Kelly Miller, Associate Dean for Learning & Research Services, University of Miami

  • Recently oversaw a large space redesign in her library.

To register for the online program, go to this URL and click on the Register link: https://acrl.webex.com/acrl/onstage/g.php?MTID=e7d9a50161fda61064d389e2426fbe34b

This session is facilitated by the ACRL ULS Professional Development Committee. Please send all questions to Jason Martin (Jason.martin@mtsu.edu)


Feb 13 2017

Deadline to Volunteer for ACRL Committees is February 15

There’s still time to volunteer to serve on an ACRL committee! The deadline is this Wednesday, February 15th. Consider volunteering with ULS, the largest section of ACRL. To help you learn more about the opportunities available with ULS and the types of work you might contribute to, we’ve made these LibGuides:

We hope these guides help you find a volunteer opportunity that would be a fit based on your interests, available time, and professional goals.

A special thanks to Nancy Gibson and the rest of the ULS Procedures Committee for helping to put these guides together.

Find the ACRL committee volunteer form here: http://www.ala.org/acrl/membership/volunteer/volunteer

Thank you for considering becoming involved with ACRL ULS!

 


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